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Hamlet's Advice To The Players Hamlet's Advice To The Players

Hamlet's Advice To The Players
Speak the speech, I pray you, as I pronounced it to you, trippingly on the tongue: but if you mouth it, as many of your players do, I had as lief the town-crier spoke my lines. Nor do not saw the air too much with your hand, thus; but use all gently, for in the very torrent, tempest, and, as I may say, whirlwind of your passion, you must acquire and beget a temperance that may give it smoothness. O, it offends me to the soul to hear a robustious periwig-pated fellow tear a passion to tatters, to very rags, to... Essays - Post by : healthlady - Date : October 2011 - Author : William Shakespeare - Read : 1407

Sonnets To Sundry Notes Of Music - VI - As it fell upon a day Sonnets To Sundry Notes Of Music - VI - As it fell upon a day

Sonnets To Sundry Notes Of Music - VI - As it fell upon a day
VI - As it fell upon a dayAs it fell upon a dayIn the merry month of May,Sitting in a pleasant shadeWhich a grove of myrtles made,Beasts did leap, and birds did sing,Trees did grow, and plants did spring;Everything did banish moan,Save the nightingale alone:She, poor bird, as all forlorn,Lean'd her breast up-till a thorn,And there sung the dolefull'st ditty,That to hear it was great pity:Fie, fie, fie, now would she cry;Teru, teru, by and by:That to hear her so complain,Scarce I could from tears refrain;For her griefs, so lively shown,Made me think upon mine own.Ah, thought I, thou mourn'st in... Poems - Post by : 48022 - Date : July 2011 - Author : William Shakespeare - Read : 1414

Sonnets To Sundry Notes Of Music - V - Live with me, and be my love Sonnets To Sundry Notes Of Music - V - Live with me, and be my love

Sonnets To Sundry Notes Of Music - V - Live with me, and be my love
V - Live with me, and be my loveLive with me, and be my love,And we will all the pleasures prove,That hills and valleys, dales and fields,And all the craggy mountains yields.There will we sit upon the rocks,And see the shepherds feed their flocks,By shallow rivers, by whose fallsMelodious birds sing madrigals.There will I make thee a bed of roses,With a thousand fragrant posies,A cap of flowers, and a kirtleEmbroider'd all with leaves of myrtle.A belt of straw and ivy buds,With coral clasps and amber studs;And if these pleasures may thee move,Then live with me and be my love.... Poems - Post by : madec - Date : July 2011 - Author : William Shakespeare - Read : 2588

Sonnets To Sundry Notes Of Music - IV - When as thine eye hath chose the dame Sonnets To Sundry Notes Of Music - IV - When as thine eye hath chose the dame

Sonnets To Sundry Notes Of Music - IV - When as thine eye hath chose the dame
IV - When as thine eye hath chose the dameWhen as thine eye hath chose the dame,And stall'd the deer that thou shouldst strike,Let reason rule things worthy blame,As well as fancy partial might: Take counsel of some wiser head, Neither too young, nor yet unwed.And when thou com'st thy tale to tell,Smooth not thy tongue with filed talk,Lest she some subtle practice smell,(A cripple soon can find a halt:) But plainly say thou lov'st her well, And set thy person forth to sell.What though her frowning brows be bent,Her cloudy looks will calm ere night;And then... Poems - Post by : daimon21 - Date : July 2011 - Author : William Shakespeare - Read : 1309

Sonnets To Sundry Notes Of Music - III - My flocks feed not Sonnets To Sundry Notes Of Music - III - My flocks feed not

Sonnets To Sundry Notes Of Music - III - My flocks feed not
III - My flocks feed notMy flocks feed not,My ewes breed not,My rams speed not, All is amiss:Love is dying,Faith's defying,Heart's denying, Causer of this.All my merry jigs are quite forgot,All my lady's love is lost, God wot:Where her faith was firmly fix'd in love,There a nay is plac'd without remove.One silly crossWrought all my loss; O frowning Fortune, cursed, fickle dame!For now I see,Inconstancy More in women than in men remain.In black mourn I,All fears scorn I,Love bath forlorn me, Living in thrall:Heart is bleeding,All help needing,(O cruel speeding!) Fraughted with gall.My shepherd's pipe... Poems - Post by : Elizabeth - Date : July 2011 - Author : William Shakespeare - Read : 3417

Sonnets To Sundry Notes Of Music - II - On a day, alack the day! Sonnets To Sundry Notes Of Music - II - On a day, alack the day!

Sonnets To Sundry Notes Of Music - II - On a day, alack the day!
II - On a day, alack the day!On a day, alack the day!Love, whose month was ever May,Spied a blossom passing fair,Playing in the wanton air:Through the velvet leaves the wind,All unseen, 'gan passage find;That the lover, sick to death,Wish'd himself the heaven's breath.Air, quoth he, thy cheeks may blow;Air, would I might triumph so!But, alas! my hand hath swornNe'er to pluck thee from thy thorn:Vow, alack, for youth unmeet,Youth, so apt to pluck a sweet,Thou for whom Jove would swearJuno but an Ethiope were;And deny himself for Jove,Turning mortal for thy love.Content of II - On a day, alack the... Poems - Post by : mutsu - Date : July 2011 - Author : William Shakespeare - Read : 3341

Sonnets To Sundry Notes Of Music - I - It was a lording's daughter, the fairest one of three Sonnets To Sundry Notes Of Music - I - It was a lording's daughter, the fairest one of three

Sonnets To Sundry Notes Of Music - I - It was a lording's daughter, the fairest one of three
I - It was a lording's daughter, the fairest one of threeIt was a lording's daughter, the fairest one of three,That liked of her master as well as well might be.Till looking on an Englishman, the fair'st that eye could see, Her fancy fell a-turning.Long was the combat doubtful, that love with love did fight,To leave the master loveless, or kill the gallant knight;To put in practice either, alas, it was a spite Unto the silly damsel!But one must be refused, more mickle was the pain,That nothing could be used, to turn them both to gain,For of the two... Poems - Post by : crikket - Date : July 2011 - Author : William Shakespeare - Read : 627

King Henry V - ACT V - SCENE II King Henry V - ACT V - SCENE II

King Henry V - ACT V - SCENE II
ACT V. SCENE II.France. The FRENCH KING'S palace.(Enter at one door, KING HENRY, EXETER, BEDFORD, GLOUCESTER,WARWICK, WESTMORELAND, and other LORDS; at another, the FRENCH KING, QUEEN ISABEL, the PRINCESS KATHERINE, ALICE,and other LADIES; the DUKE OF BURGUNDY, and his train.) KING HENRY. Peace to this meeting fore we are met! Unto our brother France, and to our sister, Health and fair time of day; joy and good wishes To our most fair and princely cousin Katherine. And, as a branch and member of this royalty,... Plays - Post by : Rx2_Central - Date : May 2011 - Author : William Shakespeare - Read : 949

King Henry V - ACT V - SCENE I King Henry V - ACT V - SCENE I

King Henry V - ACT V - SCENE I
ACT V. SCENE I.France. The English camp.(Enter FLUELLEN and GOWER.) GOWER. Nay, that's right; but why wear you your leek to-day?Saint Davy's day is past. FLUELLEN. There is occasions and causes why and wherefore inall things. I will tell you, ass my friend, Captain Gower: the rascally, scald, beggarly, lousy, pragging knave, Pistol-which you and yourself and all the world know to be no petter thana fellow, look you now, of no merits- he is come to me, andprings me pread and salt yesterday, look you, and bid me eat myleek; it... Plays - Post by : James_Albert - Date : May 2011 - Author : William Shakespeare - Read : 2462

King Henry V - ACT V PROLOGUE King Henry V - ACT V PROLOGUE

King Henry V - ACT V PROLOGUE
ACT V. PROLOGUE.(Enter CHORUS.)CHORUS. Vouchsafe to those that have not read the story That I may prompt them; and of such as have, I humbly pray them to admit th' excuse Of time, of numbers, and due course of things, Which cannot in their huge and proper life Be here presented. Now we bear the King Toward Calais. Grant him there. There seen, Heave him away upon your winged thoughts Athwart the sea. Behold, the English beach... Plays - Post by : dmcloser - Date : May 2011 - Author : William Shakespeare - Read : 2038

King Henry V - ACT IV - SCENE VIII King Henry V - ACT IV - SCENE VIII

King Henry V - ACT IV - SCENE VIII
ACT IV. SCENE VIII.Before KING HENRY'S PAVILION.(Enter GOWER and WILLIAMS.) WILLIAMS. I warrant it is to knight you, Captain.(Enter FLUELLEN.) FLUELLEN. God's will and his pleasure, Captain, I beseech you now, come apace to the King: there is more good toward you peradventure than is in your knowledge to dream of. WILLIAMS. Sir, know you this glove? FLUELLEN. Know the glove? I know the glove is a glove. WILLIAMS. I know this; and thus I challenge it.... Plays - Post by : surfnet - Date : May 2011 - Author : William Shakespeare - Read : 1191

King Henry V - ACT IV - SCENE VII King Henry V - ACT IV - SCENE VII

King Henry V - ACT IV - SCENE VII
ACT IV. SCENE VII.Another part of the field.(Enter FLUELLEN and GOWER.) FLUELLEN. Kill the poys and the luggage! 'Tis expressly againstthe law of arms; 'tis as arrant a piece of knavery, mark you now,as can be offert; in your conscience, now, is it not? GOWER. 'Tis certain there's not a boy left alive; and the cowardly rascals that ran from the battle ha' done this slaughter; besides, they have burned and carried away all that was inthe King's tent; wherefore the King most worthily hath caus'devery soldier to cut his... Plays - Post by : heymichelle - Date : May 2011 - Author : William Shakespeare - Read : 3309

King Henry V - ACT IV - SCENE VI King Henry V - ACT IV - SCENE VI

King Henry V - ACT IV - SCENE VI
ACT IV. SCENE VI.Another part of the field.(Alarum. Enter the KING and his train, with prisoners;EXETER, and others)KING HENRY. Well have we done, thrice-valiant countrymen; But all's not done- yet keep the French the field.EXETER. The Duke of York commends him to your Majesty.KING HENRY. Lives he, good uncle? Thrice within this hour I saw him down; thrice up again, and fighting; From helmet to the spur all blood he was.EXETER. In which array, brave soldier, doth he lie Larding the plain; and by his bloody side,... Plays - Post by : bhark777 - Date : May 2011 - Author : William Shakespeare - Read : 662

King Henry V - ACT IV - SCENE V King Henry V - ACT IV - SCENE V

King Henry V - ACT IV - SCENE V
ACT IV. SCENE V.Another part of the field of battle.(Enter CONSTABLE, ORLEANS, BOURBON, DAUPHIN, and RAMBURES.) CONSTABLE. O diable! ORLEANS. O Seigneur! le jour est perdu, tout est perdu! DAUPHIN. Mort Dieu, ma vie! all is confounded, all! Reproach and everlasting shame Sits mocking in our plumes. (A short alarum) O mechante fortune! Do not run away. CONSTABLE. Why, an our ranks are broke. DAUPHIN. O perdurable shame! Let's stab ourselves.... Plays - Post by : tboriskie - Date : May 2011 - Author : William Shakespeare - Read : 2041

King Henry V - ACT IV - SCENE IV King Henry V - ACT IV - SCENE IV

King Henry V - ACT IV - SCENE IV
ACT IV. SCENE IV.The field of battle.(Alarum. Excursions. Enter FRENCH SOLDIER, PISTOL, and BOY.) PISTOL. Yield, cur! FRENCH SOLDIER. Je pense que vous etes le gentilhomme de bonne qualite. PISTOL. Cality! Calen o custure me! Art thou a gentleman? What is thy name? Discuss. FRENCH SOLDIER. O Seigneur Dieu! PISTOL. O, Signieur Dew should be a gentleman. Perpend my words, O Signieur Dew, and mark: O Signieur Dew, thou diest on point... Plays - Post by : Stephen_E_Block - Date : May 2011 - Author : William Shakespeare - Read : 1977

King Henry V - ACT IV - SCENE III King Henry V - ACT IV - SCENE III

King Henry V - ACT IV - SCENE III
ACT IV. SCENE III.The English camp.(Enter GLOUCESTER, BEDFORD, EXETER, ERPINGHAM, with all his host;SALISBURY and WESTMORELAND.) GLOUCESTER. Where is the King? BEDFORD. The King himself is rode to view their battle. WESTMORELAND. Of fighting men they have full three-score thousand. EXETER. There's five to one; besides, they all are fresh. SALISBURY. God's arm strike with us! 'tis a fearful odds. God bye you, Princes all; I'll to my charge. If we no more meet till we meet in heaven,... Plays - Post by : imported_n/a - Date : May 2011 - Author : William Shakespeare - Read : 3420

King Henry V - ACT IV - SCENE II King Henry V - ACT IV - SCENE II

King Henry V - ACT IV - SCENE II
ACT IV. SCENE II.The French camp.(Enter the DAUPHIN, ORLEANS, RAMBURES, and others.) ORLEANS. The sun doth gild our armour; up, my lords! DAUPHIN. Montez a cheval! My horse! Varlet, laquais! Ha! ORLEANS. O brave spirit! DAUPHIN. Via! Les eaux et la terre- ORLEANS. Rien puis? L'air et le feu. DAUPHIN. Ciel! cousin Orleans. (Enter CONSTABLE) Now, my Lord Constable! CONSTABLE. Hark how our steeds for present service neigh!... Plays - Post by : hometutor - Date : May 2011 - Author : William Shakespeare - Read : 1739

King Henry V - ACT IV - SCENE I King Henry V - ACT IV - SCENE I

King Henry V - ACT IV - SCENE I
ACT IV. SCENE I.France. The English camp at Agincourt.(Enter the KING, BEDFORD, and GLOUCESTER.) KING HENRY. Gloucester, 'tis true that we are in great danger; The greater therefore should our courage be. Good morrow, brother Bedford. God Almighty! There is some soul of goodness in things evil, Would men observingly distil it out; For our bad neighbour makes us early stirrers, Which is both healthful and good husbandry. Besides, they are our outward consciences And... Plays - Post by : Hwee_Tay - Date : May 2011 - Author : William Shakespeare - Read : 660

King Henry V - ACT IV PROLOGUE King Henry V - ACT IV PROLOGUE

King Henry V - ACT IV PROLOGUE
ACT IV. PROLOGUE.(Enter CHORUS.)CHORUS. Now entertain conjecture of a time When creeping murmur and the poring dark Fills the wide vessel of the universe. From camp to camp, through the foul womb of night, The hum of either army stilly sounds, That the fix'd sentinels almost receive The secret whispers of each other's watch. Fire answers fire, and through their paly flames Each battle sees the other's umber'd face; Steed threatens steed, in high... Plays - Post by : highonamt - Date : May 2011 - Author : William Shakespeare - Read : 1290

King Henry V - ACT III - SCENE VII King Henry V - ACT III - SCENE VII

King Henry V - ACT III - SCENE VII
ACT III. SCENE VII.The French camp near Agincourt.(Enter the CONSTABLE OF FRANCE, the LORD RAMBURES, the DUKE OF ORLEANS, the DAUPHIN, with others.) CONSTABLE. Tut! I have the best armour of the world. Would it were day! ORLEANS. You have an excellent armour; but let my horse have his due. CONSTABLE. It is the best horse of Europe. ORLEANS. Will it never be morning? DAUPHIN. My Lord of Orleans and my Lord High Constable, youtalk of horse... Plays - Post by : kaerae01 - Date : May 2011 - Author : William Shakespeare - Read : 802