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Knickerbocker's History Of New York - BOOK 7 - Chapter 13 Knickerbocker's History Of New York - BOOK 7 - Chapter 13

Knickerbocker's History Of New York - BOOK 7 - Chapter 13
BOOK VII. CHAPTER XIII.Among the numerous events, which are each in their turn the most direful and melancholy of all possible occurrences, in your interesting and authentic history, there is none that occasions such deep and heart-rending grief as the decline and fall of your renowned and mighty empires. Where is the reader who can contemplate without emotion the disastrous events by which the great dynasties of the world have been extinguished? While wandering, in imagination, among the gigantic ruins of states and empires, and marking the tremendous convulsions that wrought their overthrow, the bosom of the melancholy inquirer swells with... Long Stories - Post by : aixtiger - Date : May 2012 - Author : Washington Irving - Read : 2437

Knickerbocker's History Of New York - BOOK 7 - Chapter 12 Knickerbocker's History Of New York - BOOK 7 - Chapter 12

Knickerbocker's History Of New York - BOOK 7 - Chapter 12
BOOK VII. CHAPTER XII.Thus then have I concluded this great historical enterprise; but before I lay aside my weary pen, there yet remains to be performed one pious duty. If, among the variety of readers who may peruse this book, there should haply be found any of those souls of true nobility, which glow with celestial fire at the history of the generous and the brave, they will doubtless be anxious to know the fate of the gallant Peter Stuyvesant. To gratify one such sterling heart of gold, I would go more lengths than to instruct the cold-blooded curiosity of a... Long Stories - Post by : reddog - Date : May 2012 - Author : Washington Irving - Read : 997

Knickerbocker's History Of New York - BOOK 7 - Chapter 11 Knickerbocker's History Of New York - BOOK 7 - Chapter 11

Knickerbocker's History Of New York - BOOK 7 - Chapter 11
BOOK VII. CHAPTER XI.There is something exceedingly sublime and melancholy in the spectacle which the present crisis of our history presents. An illustrious and venerable little city--the metropolis of a vast extent of uninhabited country--garrisoned by a doughty host of orators, chairmen, committee-men, burgomasters, schepens, and old women--governed by a determined and strong-headed warrior, and fortified by mud batteries, palisadoes, and resolutions--blockaded by sea, beleaguered by land, and threatened with direful desolation from without; while its very vitals are torn with internal faction and commotion! Never did historic pen record a page of more complicated distress, unless it be the strife... Long Stories - Post by : 49863 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Washington Irving - Read : 772

Knickerbocker's History Of New York - BOOK 7 - Chapter 10 Knickerbocker's History Of New York - BOOK 7 - Chapter 10

Knickerbocker's History Of New York - BOOK 7 - Chapter 10
BOOK VII. CHAPTER X.Now did the high-minded Peter de Groodt shower down a pannier load of maledictions upon his burgomaster for a set of self-willed, obstinate, factious varlets, who would neither be convinced nor persuaded. Nor did he omit to bestow some left-handed compliments upon the sovereign people, as a heard of poltroons, who had no relish for the glorious hardships and illustrious misadventures of battle, but would rather stay at home, and eat and sleep in ignoble ease, than fight in a ditch for immortality and a broken head.Resolutely bent, however, upon defending his beloved city, in despite even of... Long Stories - Post by : jwmcguire - Date : May 2012 - Author : Washington Irving - Read : 2525

Knickerbocker's History Of New York - BOOK 7 - Chapter 9 Knickerbocker's History Of New York - BOOK 7 - Chapter 9

Knickerbocker's History Of New York - BOOK 7 - Chapter 9
BOOK VII. CHAPTER IX.Like as an assemblage of belligerent cats, gibbering and caterwauling, eyeing one another with hideous grimaces and contortions, spitting in each other's faces, and on the point of a general clapper-clawing, are suddenly put to scampering rout and confusion by the appearance of a house-dog, so was the no less vociferous council of New Amsterdam amazed, astounded, and totally dispersed by the sudden arrival of the enemy. Every member waddled home as fast as his short legs could carry him, wheezing as he went with corpulency and terror. Arrived at his castle, he barricaded the street-door, and buried... Long Stories - Post by : dswanger - Date : May 2012 - Author : Washington Irving - Read : 1716

Knickerbocker's History Of New York - BOOK 7 - Chapter 8 Knickerbocker's History Of New York - BOOK 7 - Chapter 8

Knickerbocker's History Of New York - BOOK 7 - Chapter 8
BOOK VII. CHAPTER VIII.It will need but little penetration in any one conversant with the ways of that wise but windy potentate, the sovereign people, to discover that not withstanding all the warlike bluster and bustle of the last chapter, the city of New Amsterdam was not a whit more prepared for war than before. The privy councillors of Peter Stuyvesant were aware of this; and, having received his private orders to put the city in an immediate posture of defense, they called a meeting of the oldest and richest burghers to assist them with their wisdom. These were of that... Long Stories - Post by : chrisknight - Date : May 2012 - Author : Washington Irving - Read : 1756

Knickerbocker's History Of New York - BOOK 7 - Chapter 7 Knickerbocker's History Of New York - BOOK 7 - Chapter 7

Knickerbocker's History Of New York - BOOK 7 - Chapter 7
BOOK VII. CHAPTER VII.There is no sight more truly interesting to a philosopher than a community where every individual has a voice in public affairs; where every individual considers himself the Atlas of the nation; and where every individual thinks it his duty to bestir himself for the good of his country--I say, there is nothing more interesting to a philosopher than such a community in a sudden bustle of war. Such clamor of tongues--such patriotic bawling--such running hither and thither--everybody in a hurry--everybody in trouble--everybody in the way, and everybody interrupting his neighbor--who is busily employed in doing nothing! It... Long Stories - Post by : mikegiving - Date : May 2012 - Author : Washington Irving - Read : 1462

Knickerbocker's History Of New York - BOOK 7 - Chapter 6 Knickerbocker's History Of New York - BOOK 7 - Chapter 6

Knickerbocker's History Of New York - BOOK 7 - Chapter 6
BOOK VII. CHAPTER VI.Great nations resemble great men in this particular, that their greatness is seldom known until they get in trouble; adversity, therefore, has been wisely denominated the ordeal of true greatness, which, like gold, can never receive its real estimation until it has passed through the furnace. In proportion, therefore, as a nation, a community, or an individual (possessing the inherent quality of greatness) is involved in perils and misfortunes, in proportion does it rise in grandeur; and even when sinking under calamity, makes, like a house on fire, a more glorious display than ever it did in the... Long Stories - Post by : win_thomas - Date : May 2012 - Author : Washington Irving - Read : 2530

Knickerbocker's History Of New York - BOOK 7 - Chapter 5 Knickerbocker's History Of New York - BOOK 7 - Chapter 5

Knickerbocker's History Of New York - BOOK 7 - Chapter 5
BOOK VII. CHAPTER V.Now so it happened, that while the great and good Peter Stuyvesant, followed by his trusty squire, was making his chivalric progress through the east country, a dark and direful scheme of war against his beloved province was forming in that nursery of monstrous projects, the British Cabinet.This, we are confidently informed, was the result of the secret instigations of the great council of the league; who, finding themselves totally incompetent to vie in arms with the heavy-sterned warriors of the Manhattoes and their iron-headed commander, sent emissaries to the British Government, setting forth in eloquent language the... Long Stories - Post by : Elric - Date : May 2012 - Author : Washington Irving - Read : 3247

Knickerbocker's History Of New York - BOOK 7 - Chapter 4 Knickerbocker's History Of New York - BOOK 7 - Chapter 4

Knickerbocker's History Of New York - BOOK 7 - Chapter 4
BOOK VII. CHAPTER IV.To explain the apparently sudden movement of Peter Stuyvesant against the crafty men of the East Country, I would observe that, during his campaigns on the South River, and in the enchanted regions of the Catskill Mountains, the twelve tribes of the East had been more than usually active in prosecuting their subtle scheme for the subjugation of the Nieuw Nederlands.Independent of the incessant maraudings among hen-roosts and squattings along the border, invading armies would penetrate, from time to time, into the very heart of the country. As their prototypes of yore went forth into the land of... Long Stories - Post by : mewarrior - Date : May 2012 - Author : Washington Irving - Read : 1246

Knickerbocker's History Of New York - BOOK 7 - Chapter 3 Knickerbocker's History Of New York - BOOK 7 - Chapter 3

Knickerbocker's History Of New York - BOOK 7 - Chapter 3
BOOK VII. CHAPTER III.In the last two chapters I have regaled the reader with a delectable picture of the good Peter and his metropolis during an interval of peace. It was, however, but a bit of blue sky in a stormy day; the clouds are again gathering up from all points of the compass, and, if I am not mistaken in my forebodings, we shall have rattling weather in the ensuing chapters.It is with some communities, as it is with certain meddlesome individuals--they have a wonderful facility at getting into scrapes; and I have always remarked that those are most prone... Long Stories - Post by : Jim_Hutton - Date : May 2012 - Author : Washington Irving - Read : 1186

Knickerbocker's History Of New York - BOOK 7 - Chapter 2 Knickerbocker's History Of New York - BOOK 7 - Chapter 2

Knickerbocker's History Of New York - BOOK 7 - Chapter 2
BOOK VII. CHAPTER II.From what I have recounted in the foregoing chapter, I would not have it imagined that the great Peter was a tyrannical potentate, ruling with a rod of iron. On the contrary the dignity of office permitted, he abounded in generosity and condescension. If he refused the brawling multitude the right of misrule, he at least endeavored to rule them in righteousness. To spread abundance in the land, he obliged the bakers to give thirteen loaves to the dozen--a golden rule which remains a monument of his beneficence. So far from indulging in unreasonable austerity, he delighted... Long Stories - Post by : EquityChampion - Date : May 2012 - Author : Washington Irving - Read : 2118

Knickerbocker's History Of New York - BOOK 7 - Chapter 1 Knickerbocker's History Of New York - BOOK 7 - Chapter 1

Knickerbocker's History Of New York - BOOK 7 - Chapter 1
BOOK VII. CHAPTER ICONTAINING THE THIRD PART OF THE REIGN OF PETER THE HEADSTRONG--HIS TROUBLES WITH THE BRITISH NATION, AND THE DECLINE AND FALL OF THE DUTCH DYNASTY.The history of the reign of Peter Stuyvesant furnishes an edifying picture of the cares and vexations inseparable from sovereignty, and a solemn warning to all who are ambitious of attaining the seat of honor. Though returning in triumph and crowned with victory, his exultation was checked on observing the abuses which had sprung up in New Amsterdam during his short absence. His walking-staff which he had sent home to act as his vicegerent,... Long Stories - Post by : scdayton - Date : May 2012 - Author : Washington Irving - Read : 2442

Knickerbocker's History Of New York - BOOK 6 - Chapter 9 Knickerbocker's History Of New York - BOOK 6 - Chapter 9

Knickerbocker's History Of New York - BOOK 6 - Chapter 9
BOOK VI. CHAPTER IX.Thanks to St. Nicholas, we have safely finished this tremendous battle. Let us sit down, my worthy reader, and cool ourselves, for I am in a prodigious sweat and agitation. Truly this fighting of battles is hot work! and if your great commanders did but know what trouble they give their historians, they would not have the conscience to achieve so many horrible victories. But methinks I hear my reader complain that throughout this boasted battle there is not the least slaughter, nor a single individual maimed, if we except the unhappy Swede, who was shorn of his... Long Stories - Post by : harlonrichards - Date : May 2012 - Author : Washington Irving - Read : 828

Knickerbocker's History Of New York - BOOK 6 - Chapter 8 Knickerbocker's History Of New York - BOOK 6 - Chapter 8

Knickerbocker's History Of New York - BOOK 6 - Chapter 8
BOOK VI. CHAPTER VIII."Now had the Dutchmen snatched a huge repast," and finding themselves wonderfully encouraged and animated thereby, prepared to take the field. Expectation, says the writer of the Stuyvesant manuscript, expectation now stood on stilts. The world forgot to turn round, or rather stood still, that it might witness the affray, like a round-bellied alderman watching the combat of two chivalrous flies upon his jerkin. The eyes of all mankind, as usual in such cases, were turned upon Fort Cristina. The sun, like a little man in a crowd at a puppet-show, scampered about the heavens, popping his head... Long Stories - Post by : rmahon - Date : May 2012 - Author : Washington Irving - Read : 3295

Knickerbocker's History Of New York - BOOK 6 - Chapter 7 Knickerbocker's History Of New York - BOOK 6 - Chapter 7

Knickerbocker's History Of New York - BOOK 6 - Chapter 7
BOOK VI. CHAPTER VII.Like as a mighty alderman, when at a corporation feast the first spoonful of turtle-soup salutes his palate, feels his appetite but tenfold quickened, and redoubles his vigorous attacks upon the tureen, while his projecting eyes rolled greedily round, devouring everything at table; so did the mettlesome Peter Stuyvesant feel that hunger for martial glory, which raged within his bowels, inflamed by the capture of Fort Casimir, and nothing could allay it but the conquest of all New Sweden. No sooner, therefore, had he secured his conquest than he stumped resolutely on, flushed with success, to gather fresh... Long Stories - Post by : kevingaunt - Date : May 2012 - Author : Washington Irving - Read : 1387

Knickerbocker's History Of New York - BOOK 6 - Chapter 6 Knickerbocker's History Of New York - BOOK 6 - Chapter 6

Knickerbocker's History Of New York - BOOK 6 - Chapter 6
BOOK VI. CHAPTER VI.As my readers and myself are about entering on as many perils as ever a confederacy of meddlesome knights-errant wilfully ran their heads into it is meet that, like those hardy adventurers, we should join hands, bury all differences, and swear to stand by one another, in weal or woe, to the end of the enterprise. My readers must doubtless perceive how completely I have altered my tone and deportment since we first set out together. I warrant they then thought me a crabbed, cynical, impertinent little son of a Dutchman; for I scarcely ever gave them a... Long Stories - Post by : 01ronco - Date : May 2012 - Author : Washington Irving - Read : 2726

Knickerbocker's History Of New York - BOOK 6 - Chapter 5 Knickerbocker's History Of New York - BOOK 6 - Chapter 5

Knickerbocker's History Of New York - BOOK 6 - Chapter 5
BOOK VI. CHAPTER V.While thus the enterprising Peter was coasting, with flowing sail, up the shores of the lordly Hudson, and arousing all the phlegmatic little Dutch settlements upon its borders, a great and puissant concourse of warriors was assembling at the city of New Amsterdam. And here that invaluable fragment of antiquity, the Stuyvesant manuscript, is more than commonly particular; by which means I am enabled to record the illustrious host that encamped itself in the public square in front of the fort, at present denominated the Bowling Green.In the center, then, was pitched the tent of the men of... Long Stories - Post by : St?phane_D - Date : May 2012 - Author : Washington Irving - Read : 3693

Knickerbocker's History Of New York - BOOK 6 - Chapter 4 Knickerbocker's History Of New York - BOOK 6 - Chapter 4

Knickerbocker's History Of New York - BOOK 6 - Chapter 4
BOOK VI. CHAPTER IV.Now did the soft breezes of the south steal sweetly over the face of nature, tempering the panting heats of summer into genial and prolific warmth, when that miracle of hardihood and chivalric virtue, the dauntless Peter Stuyvesant, spread his canvas to the wind, and departed from the fair island of Manna-hata. The galley in which he embarked was sumptuously adorned with pendants and streamers of gorgeous dyes, which fluttered gayly in the wind, or drooped their ends into the bosom of the stream. The bow and poop of this majestic vessel were gallantly bedight, after the rarest... Long Stories - Post by : London - Date : May 2012 - Author : Washington Irving - Read : 2229

Knickerbocker's History Of New York - BOOK 6 - Chapter 3 Knickerbocker's History Of New York - BOOK 6 - Chapter 3

Knickerbocker's History Of New York - BOOK 6 - Chapter 3
BOOK VI. CHAPTER III.Whoever first described common fame, or rumor, as belonging to the sager sex, was a very owl for shrewdness. She has in truth certain feminine qualities to an astonishing degree, particularly that benevolent anxiety to take care of the affairs of others, which keeps her continually hunting after secrets and gadding about proclaiming them. Whatever is done openly and in the face of the world, she takes but transient notice of; but whenever a transaction is done in a corner, and attempted to be shrouded in mystery, then her goddess-ship is at her wits' end to find it... Long Stories - Post by : thisbiz - Date : May 2012 - Author : Washington Irving - Read : 3341