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The Land Of The Blessed Virgin; Sketches And Impressions In Andalusia - Chapter XL. (Sidenote: Adios) The Land Of The Blessed Virgin; Sketches And Impressions In Andalusia - Chapter XL. (Sidenote: Adios)

The Land Of The Blessed Virgin; Sketches And Impressions In Andalusia - Chapter XL. (Sidenote: Adios)
And then the morrow was come. Getting up at five to catch my boat, I went down to the harbour; a grey mist hung over the sea, and the sun had barely risen, a pallid, yellow circle; the fishing-boats lolled on the smooth, dim water, and fishermen in little groups blew on their fingers.And from Cadiz I saw the shores of Spain sink into the sea; I saw my last of Andalusia. Who, when he leaves a place that he has loved, can help wondering when he will see it again? I asked the wind, and it sighed back the Spanish... Nonfictions - Post by : rlscott - Date : May 2012 - Author : W. Somerset Maugham - Read : 1494

The Land Of The Blessed Virgin; Sketches And Impressions In Andalusia - Chapter XXXIX. (Sidenote: El Genero Chico) The Land Of The Blessed Virgin; Sketches And Impressions In Andalusia - Chapter XXXIX. (Sidenote: El Genero Chico)

The Land Of The Blessed Virgin; Sketches And Impressions In Andalusia - Chapter XXXIX. (Sidenote: El Genero Chico)
In the evening I wandered again along the quay, my thoughts part occupied with the novel things I expected from Morocco, part sorrowful because I must leave the scented land of Spain. I seemed never before to have enjoyed so intensely the exquisite softness of the air, and there was all about me a sense of spaciousness which gave a curious feeling of power. In the harbour, on the ships, the lights of the masts twinkled like the stars above; and looking over the stony parapet, I heard the waves lap against the granite like a long murmur of regret; I... Nonfictions - Post by : add2it - Date : May 2012 - Author : W. Somerset Maugham - Read : 3207

The Land Of The Blessed Virgin; Sketches And Impressions In Andalusia - Chapter XXXVIII. (Sidenote: Cadiz) The Land Of The Blessed Virgin; Sketches And Impressions In Andalusia - Chapter XXXVIII. (Sidenote: Cadiz)

The Land Of The Blessed Virgin; Sketches And Impressions In Andalusia - Chapter XXXVIII. (Sidenote: Cadiz)
I admire the strenuous tourist who sets out in the morning with his well-thumbed Baedeker to examine the curiosities of a foreign town, but I do not follow in his steps; his eagerness after knowledge, his devotion to duty, compel my respect, but excite me to no imitation. I prefer to wander in old streets at random without a guide-book, trusting that fortune will bring me across things worth seeing; and if occasionally I miss some monument that is world-famous, more often I discover some little dainty piece of architecture, some scrap of decoration, that repays me for all else I... Nonfictions - Post by : Dusty13 - Date : May 2012 - Author : W. Somerset Maugham - Read : 2897

The Land Of The Blessed Virgin; Sketches And Impressions In Andalusia - Chapter XXXVII. (Sidenote: Jerez) The Land Of The Blessed Virgin; Sketches And Impressions In Andalusia - Chapter XXXVII. (Sidenote: Jerez)

The Land Of The Blessed Virgin; Sketches And Impressions In Andalusia - Chapter XXXVII. (Sidenote: Jerez)
Jerez is the Andalusian sunshine again after the dark clouds of Granada. It is a little town in the middle of a fertile plain, clean and comfortable and spacious. It is one of the richest places in Spain; the houses have an opulent look, and without the help of Baedeker you may guess that they contain respectable persons with incomes, and carriages and horses, with frock-coats and gold watch-chains. I like the people of Jerez; their habitual expression suggests a consciousness that the Almighty is pleased with them, and they without doubt are well content with the Almighty. The main street,... Nonfictions - Post by : runtonk - Date : May 2012 - Author : W. Somerset Maugham - Read : 1051

The Land Of The Blessed Virgin; Sketches And Impressions In Andalusia - Chapter XXXVI. (Sidenote: The Song) The Land Of The Blessed Virgin; Sketches And Impressions In Andalusia - Chapter XXXVI. (Sidenote: The Song)

The Land Of The Blessed Virgin; Sketches And Impressions In Andalusia - Chapter XXXVI. (Sidenote: The Song)
But the Moorish influence is nowhere more apparent than in the Spanish singing. There is nothing European in that quavering lament, in those long-drawn and monotonous notes, in those weird trills. The sounds are strange to the ear accustomed to less barbarous harmonies, and at first no melody is perceived; it is custom alone which teaches the sad and passionate charm of these things. A _malaguena is the particular complaint of the maid sorrowing for an absent lover, of the peasant who ploughs his field in the declining day. The long notes of such a song, floating across the silence of... Nonfictions - Post by : mrtwist - Date : May 2012 - Author : W. Somerset Maugham - Read : 2789

The Land Of The Blessed Virgin; Sketches And Impressions In Andalusia - Chapter XXXV. (Sidenote: Los Pobres) The Land Of The Blessed Virgin; Sketches And Impressions In Andalusia - Chapter XXXV. (Sidenote: Los Pobres)

The Land Of The Blessed Virgin; Sketches And Impressions In Andalusia - Chapter XXXV. (Sidenote: Los Pobres)
People say that in Granada the beggars are more importunate than in any other Spanish town, but throughout Andalusia their pertinacity and number are amazing. They are licensed by the State, and the brass badge they wear makes them demand alms almost as a right. It is curious to find that the Spaniard, who is by no means a charitable being, gives very often to beggars--perhaps from superstitious motives, thinking their prayers will be of service, or fearing the evil eye, which may punish a refusal. Begging is quite an honourable profession in Spain; mendicants are charitably termed the poor, and... Nonfictions - Post by : ow24160 - Date : May 2012 - Author : W. Somerset Maugham - Read : 1608

The Land Of The Blessed Virgin; Sketches And Impressions In Andalusia - Chapter XXXIV. (Sidenote: Boabdil the Unlucky) The Land Of The Blessed Virgin; Sketches And Impressions In Andalusia - Chapter XXXIV. (Sidenote: Boabdil the Unlucky)

The Land Of The Blessed Virgin; Sketches And Impressions In Andalusia - Chapter XXXIV. (Sidenote: Boabdil the Unlucky)
He was indeed unhappy who lost such treasure. The plain of Granada smiles with luxuriant crops, a beautiful country, gay with a hundred colours, and in summer when the corn is ripe it burns with vivid gold. The sun shines with fiery rays from the blue sky, and from the snow-capped mountains cool breezes temper the heat.But from his cradle Boabdil was unfortunate; soothsayers prophesied that his reign would see the downfall of the Moorish power, and his every step tended to that end. Never in human existence was more evident the mysterious power of the three sisters, the daughters of... Nonfictions - Post by : codebluenj - Date : May 2012 - Author : W. Somerset Maugham - Read : 1002

The Land Of The Blessed Virgin; Sketches And Impressions In Andalusia - Chapter XXXIII. (Sidenote: The Alhambra) The Land Of The Blessed Virgin; Sketches And Impressions In Andalusia - Chapter XXXIII. (Sidenote: The Alhambra)

The Land Of The Blessed Virgin; Sketches And Impressions In Andalusia - Chapter XXXIII. (Sidenote: The Alhambra)
From the church of _San Nicolas_, on the other side of the valley, the Alhambra, like all Moorish buildings externally very plain, with its red walls and low, tiled roofs, looks like some old charter-house. Encircled by the fresh green of the spring-time, it lies along the summit of the hill with an infinite, most simple grace, dun and brown and deep red; and from the sultry wall on which I sat the elm-trees and the poplars seemed very cool. Thirstily, after the long drought, the Darro, the Arab stream which ran scarlet with the blood of Moorish strife, wound its... Nonfictions - Post by : Joe_Coon - Date : May 2012 - Author : W. Somerset Maugham - Read : 2992

The Land Of The Blessed Virgin; Sketches And Impressions In Andalusia - Chapter XXXII. (Sidenote: Granada) The Land Of The Blessed Virgin; Sketches And Impressions In Andalusia - Chapter XXXII. (Sidenote: Granada)

The Land Of The Blessed Virgin; Sketches And Impressions In Andalusia - Chapter XXXII. (Sidenote: Granada)
To go from Seville to Granada is like coming out of the sunshine into deep shadow. I arrived, my mind full of Moorish pictures, expecting to find a vivid, tumultuous life; and I was ready with a prodigal hand to dash on the colours of my admiration. But Granada is a sad town, grey and empty; its people meander, melancholy, through the streets, unoccupied. It is a tradeless place living on the monuments which attract strangers, and like many a city famous for stirring history, seems utterly exhausted. Granada gave me an impression that it wished merely to be left alone... Nonfictions - Post by : Joe_Coon - Date : May 2012 - Author : W. Somerset Maugham - Read : 3451

The Land Of The Blessed Virgin; Sketches And Impressions In Andalusia - Chapter XXXI. (Sidenote: Two Villages) The Land Of The Blessed Virgin; Sketches And Impressions In Andalusia - Chapter XXXI. (Sidenote: Two Villages)

The Land Of The Blessed Virgin; Sketches And Impressions In Andalusia - Chapter XXXI. (Sidenote: Two Villages)
Marchena was all white, and on the cold windy evening I spent there, deserted of inhabitants. Quite rarely a man sidled past wrapped to the eyes in his cloak, or a woman with a black shawl over her head. I saw in the town nothing characteristic but the wicker-work frame in front of each window, so that people within could not possibly be seen; it was evidently a Moorish survival. At night men came into the eating-room of the inn, ate their dinner silently, and muffling themselves, quickly went out; the cold seemed to have killed all life in them. I... Nonfictions - Post by : Dusty13 - Date : May 2012 - Author : W. Somerset Maugham - Read : 1750

The Land Of The Blessed Virgin; Sketches And Impressions In Andalusia - Chapter XXX. (Sidenote: Wind and Storm) The Land Of The Blessed Virgin; Sketches And Impressions In Andalusia - Chapter XXX. (Sidenote: Wind and Storm)

The Land Of The Blessed Virgin; Sketches And Impressions In Andalusia - Chapter XXX. (Sidenote: Wind and Storm)
But next morning the sky was dark with clouds; people looked up dubiously when I asked the way and distance to Marchena, prophesying rain. Fetching my horse, the owner of the stable robbed me with peculiar callousness, for he had bound my hands the day before, when I went to see how Aguador was treated, by giving me with most courteous ceremony a glass of _aguardiente_; and his urbanity was then so captivating that now I lacked assurance to protest. I paid the scandalous overcharge with a good grace, finding some solace in the reflection that he was at least a... Nonfictions - Post by : cclittle - Date : May 2012 - Author : W. Somerset Maugham - Read : 2542

The Land Of The Blessed Virgin; Sketches And Impressions In Andalusia - Chapter XXIX. (Sidenote: Ecija) The Land Of The Blessed Virgin; Sketches And Impressions In Andalusia - Chapter XXIX. (Sidenote: Ecija)

The Land Of The Blessed Virgin; Sketches And Impressions In Andalusia - Chapter XXIX. (Sidenote: Ecija)
The central square are the government offices, the taverns, and a little inn, is a charming place, quiet and lackadaisical, its pale browns and greys very restful in the twilight, and harmonious. The houses with their queer windows and their balconies of wrought iron are built upon arcades which give a pleasant feeling of intimacy: in summer, cool and dark, they must be the promenade of all the gossips and the loungers. One can imagine the uneventful life, the monotonous round of existence; and yet the Andalusian blood runs in the people's veins. To my writer's fantasy Ecija seemed a... Nonfictions - Post by : add2it - Date : May 2012 - Author : W. Somerset Maugham - Read : 770

The Land Of The Blessed Virgin; Sketches And Impressions In Andalusia - Chapter XXVIII. (Sidenote: By the Road--II) The Land Of The Blessed Virgin; Sketches And Impressions In Andalusia - Chapter XXVIII. (Sidenote: By the Road--II)

The Land Of The Blessed Virgin; Sketches And Impressions In Andalusia - Chapter XXVIII. (Sidenote: By the Road--II)
The endless desert grew rocky and less sandy, the colours duller. Even the palmetto found scanty sustenance, and huge boulders, strewn as though some vast torrent had passed through the plain, alone broke the desolate flatness. The dusty road pursued its way, invariably straight, neither turning to one side nor to the other, but continually in front of me, a long white line.Finally in the distance I saw a group of white buildings and a cluster of trees. I thought it was Luisiana, but Luisiana, they had said, was a populous hamlet, and here were only two or three houses and... Nonfictions - Post by : runtonk - Date : May 2012 - Author : W. Somerset Maugham - Read : 2527

The Land Of The Blessed Virgin; Sketches And Impressions In Andalusia - Chapter XXVII. (Sidenote: By the Road--I) The Land Of The Blessed Virgin; Sketches And Impressions In Andalusia - Chapter XXVII. (Sidenote: By the Road--I)

The Land Of The Blessed Virgin; Sketches And Impressions In Andalusia - Chapter XXVII. (Sidenote: By the Road--I)
The approach to Carmona is a very broad, white street, much too wide for the cottages which line it, deserted; and the young trees planted on either side are too small to give shade. The sun beat down with a fierce glare and the dust rose in clouds as I passed. Presently I came to a great Moorish gateway, a dark mass of stone, battlemented, with a lofty horseshoe arch. People were gathered about it in many-coloured groups, I found it was a holiday in Carmona, and the animation was unwonted; in a corner stood the hut of the _Consumo_, and... Nonfictions - Post by : JuvioSuccess - Date : May 2012 - Author : W. Somerset Maugham - Read : 3265

The Land Of The Blessed Virgin; Sketches And Impressions In Andalusia - Chapter XXVI. (Sidenote: On Horseback) The Land Of The Blessed Virgin; Sketches And Impressions In Andalusia - Chapter XXVI. (Sidenote: On Horseback)

The Land Of The Blessed Virgin; Sketches And Impressions In Andalusia - Chapter XXVI. (Sidenote: On Horseback)
I had a desire to see something of the very heart of Andalusia, of that part of the country which had preserved its antique character railway trains were not, and the horse, the mule, the donkey were still the only means of transit. After much scrutiny of local maps and conversation with horse-dealers and others, I determined from Seville to go circuitously to Ecija, and thence return by another route as best I could. The district I meant to traverse in olden times was notorious for its brigands; even thirty years ago the prosperous tradesman, voyaging on his mule from... Nonfictions - Post by : vbhnl - Date : May 2012 - Author : W. Somerset Maugham - Read : 1591

The Land Of The Blessed Virgin; Sketches And Impressions In Andalusia - Chapter XXV. (Sidenote: Corrida de Toros--II) The Land Of The Blessed Virgin; Sketches And Impressions In Andalusia - Chapter XXV. (Sidenote: Corrida de Toros--II)

The Land Of The Blessed Virgin; Sketches And Impressions In Andalusia - Chapter XXV. (Sidenote: Corrida de Toros--II)
One or two shouts are heard, a murmur passes through the people, and the bull emerges--shining, black, with massive shoulders and fine horns. It advances a little, a splendid beast conscious of its strength, and suddenly stops dead, looking round. The _toreros wave their capes and the _picadors flourish their lances, long wooden spikes with an iron point. The bull catches sight of a horse, and lowering his head, bears down swiftly upon it. The _picador takes firmer hold of his lance, and when the brute reaches him plants the pointed end between its shoulders; at the same moment the senior... Nonfictions - Post by : add2it - Date : May 2012 - Author : W. Somerset Maugham - Read : 2483

The Land Of The Blessed Virgin; Sketches And Impressions In Andalusia - Chapter XXIV. (Sidenote: Corrida de Toros--I) The Land Of The Blessed Virgin; Sketches And Impressions In Andalusia - Chapter XXIV. (Sidenote: Corrida de Toros--I)

The Land Of The Blessed Virgin; Sketches And Impressions In Andalusia - Chapter XXIV. (Sidenote: Corrida de Toros--I)
On the day before a bull-fight all the world goes down to Tablada to see the bulls. Youth and beauty drive, for every one in Seville of the least pretension to gentility keeps a carriage; the Sevillans, characteristically, may live in houses void of every necessity and comfort, eating bread and water, but they will have a carriage to drive in the _paseo_. You see vehicles of all kinds, from the new landau with a pair of magnificent Andalusian horses, or the strange omnibus drawn by mules, typical of Southern Spain, to the shabby victoria, with a broken-down hack and a... Nonfictions - Post by : sbeard - Date : May 2012 - Author : W. Somerset Maugham - Read : 1822

The Land Of The Blessed Virgin; Sketches And Impressions In Andalusia - Chapter XXIII. (Sidenote: Before the Bull-fight) The Land Of The Blessed Virgin; Sketches And Impressions In Andalusia - Chapter XXIII. (Sidenote: Before the Bull-fight)

The Land Of The Blessed Virgin; Sketches And Impressions In Andalusia - Chapter XXIII. (Sidenote: Before the Bull-fight)
If all Andalusians are potential gaol-birds they are also potential bull-fighters. It is impossible for foreigners to realise how firmly the love of that pastime is engrained in all classes. In other countries the gift that children love best is a box of soldiers, but in Spain it is a miniature ring with tin bulls, _picadors on horseback and _toreros_. From their earliest youth boys play at bull-fighting, one of them taking the bull's part and charging with the movements peculiar to that animal, while the rest make passes with their coats or handkerchiefs. Often, to increase the excitement of the... Nonfictions - Post by : Joe_Coon - Date : May 2012 - Author : W. Somerset Maugham - Read : 985

The Land Of The Blessed Virgin; Sketches And Impressions In Andalusia - Chapter XXII. (Sidenote: Gaol) The Land Of The Blessed Virgin; Sketches And Impressions In Andalusia - Chapter XXII. (Sidenote: Gaol)

The Land Of The Blessed Virgin; Sketches And Impressions In Andalusia - Chapter XXII. (Sidenote: Gaol)
I was curious to see the prison in Seville. Gruesome tales had been told me of its filth and horror, and the wretched condition of the prisoners; I had even heard that from the street you might see them pressing against the barred windows with arms thrust through, begging the passer-by for money or bread. Mediaeval stories recurred to my mind and the clank of chains trailed through my imagination.I arranged to be conducted by the prison doctor, and one morning soon after five set out to meet him. My guide informed me by a significant gesture that his tendencies were--bibulous,... Nonfictions - Post by : cclittle - Date : May 2012 - Author : W. Somerset Maugham - Read : 1601

The Land Of The Blessed Virgin; Sketches And Impressions In Andalusia - Chapter XXI. (Sidenote: The Hospital of Charity) The Land Of The Blessed Virgin; Sketches And Impressions In Andalusia - Chapter XXI. (Sidenote: The Hospital of Charity)

The Land Of The Blessed Virgin; Sketches And Impressions In Andalusia - Chapter XXI. (Sidenote: The Hospital of Charity)
The Spaniards possess to the fullest degree the art of evoking devout emotions, and in their various churches may be experienced every phase of religious feeling. After the majestic size and the solemn mystery of the Cathedral, nothing can come as a greater contrast than the Church of the Hermandad de la Caredad. It was built by don Miguel de Manara, who rests in the chancel, with the inscription over him: '_Aqui jacen los huesos y cenizas del peor hombre que ha habido en el mundo; ruegan por el_'--'Here lie the bones and ashes of the worst man that has ever... Nonfictions - Post by : Truman - Date : May 2012 - Author : W. Somerset Maugham - Read : 1584