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Socrates - Act 2 Socrates - Act 2

Socrates - Act 2
ACT IISOPHRONINE.Divine Socrates, I cannot believe my luck: how can it be that Aglaeawhose father died in extreme poverty has such a considerable dowry?SOCRATES.I already told you; she had more than she knew. I knew her father'sresources better than she. May it suffice you both to enjoy a fortuneyou deserve; as for myself, I owe the dead a secret as well as theliving.SOPHRONINE.I have only one fear; it's that that priest of Ceres, over whom you'vepreferred me will avenge Aglaea's refusals on you. He's a man reallyto be feared.SOCRATES.Eh! What can be feared when one is doing one's duty? I know... Plays - Post by : granknee - Date : May 2012 - Author : Voltaire - Read : 3402

Socrates - Act 1 Socrates - Act 1

Socrates - Act 1
ACT IANITUS.My dear confidants, my dear agents, you know how much money I made youduring the last festival of Ceres. I'm getting married and I hope youwill do your duty on this grand occasion.DRIXA.Yes, without doubt, Milord, since you are going to make us earn yetmore.ANITUS.Madame Drixa, I must have two beautiful Persian rugs. You, Terpandre,of you I only ask two large silver candelabra. And of you, Acros, ahalf dozen dresses of silk embroidered with gold.TERPANDRE.That's a bit much; but Milord there's nothing I won't do to deserveyour holy protection.ANITUS.You will regain all that a hundred fold. It's the best way... Plays - Post by : granknee - Date : May 2012 - Author : Voltaire - Read : 1774

Socrates - Characters Socrates - Characters

Socrates - Characters
SOCRATES BY VOLTAIRE Translated and adapted by... Plays - Post by : granknee - Date : May 2012 - Author : Voltaire - Read : 2246

Socrates - Act 3 Socrates - Act 3

Socrates - Act 3
ACT III (The Judges are seated on a tribunal. Socrates is standing.)A JUDGE. (to Anitus)You mustn't sit here. You are a priest of Ceres.ANITUS.I am only here for edification.MELITUS.Silence. Listen, Socrates, you are accused of being a bad citizen; ofcorrupting the youth; of denying the plurality of the gods; of being aheretic, deist, atheist. Answer.SOCRATES.Athenian Judges, I exhort you always to be good citizens as I havealways tried to be. To shed your blood for the country as I have donein more than one battle. Regarding the youth of which you speak, donot cease to guide them through your admonitions, and... Plays - Post by : mentor4u - Date : May 2012 - Author : Voltaire - Read : 2628

Candide: Or, Optimism - Chapter 30. The Conclusion Candide: Or, Optimism - Chapter 30. The Conclusion

Candide: Or, Optimism - Chapter 30. The Conclusion
CHAPTER XXX. THE CONCLUSIONAt the bottom of his heart Candide had no wish to marry Cunegonde. But the extreme impertinence of the Baron determined him to conclude the match, and Cunegonde pressed him so strongly that he could not go from his word. He consulted Pangloss, Martin, and the faithful Cacambo. Pangloss drew up an excellent memorial in he proved that the Baron had no right over his sister, and that according to all the laws of the empire, she might marry Candide with her left hand. Martin was for throwing the Baron into the sea; Cacambo decided that it would... Long Stories - Post by : Laurie - Date : May 2012 - Author : Voltaire - Read : 1294

Candide: Or, Optimism - Chapter 26. Of A Supper Which Candide And Martin Took With Six Strangers... Candide: Or, Optimism - Chapter 26. Of A Supper Which Candide And Martin Took With Six Strangers...

Candide: Or, Optimism - Chapter 26. Of A Supper Which Candide And Martin Took With Six Strangers...
CHAPTER XXVI. OF A SUPPER WHICH CANDIDE AND MARTIN TOOK WITH SIX STRANGERS, AND WHO THEY WERE.(34)FOOTNOTE(34) P. 142. The following particulars of the six monarchs may prove not uninteresting. Achmet III. (_b. 1673, _d. 1739) was dethroned in 1730. Ivan VI. (_b. 1740, _d. 1762) was dethroned in 1741. Charles Edward Stuart, the Pretender (_b. 1720, _d. 1788). Auguste III. (_b. 1696, _d. 1763). Stanislaus (_b. 1682, _d. 1766). Theodore (_b. 1690, _d. 1755). It will be observed that, although quite impossible for the six kings ever to have met, five of them might have been made to... Long Stories - Post by : enriquegaribay - Date : May 2012 - Author : Voltaire - Read : 1673

Candide: Or, Optimism - Chapter 25. The Visit To Lord Pococurante, A Noble Venetian Candide: Or, Optimism - Chapter 25. The Visit To Lord Pococurante, A Noble Venetian

Candide: Or, Optimism - Chapter 25. The Visit To Lord Pococurante, A Noble Venetian
CHAPTER XXV. THE VISIT TO LORD POCOCURANTE, A NOBLE VENETIANCandide and Martin went in a gondola on the Brenta, and arrived at the palace of the noble Signor Pococurante. The gardens, laid out with taste, were adorned with fine marble statues. The palace was beautifully built. The master of the house was a man of sixty, and very rich. He received the two travellers with polite indifference, which put Candide a little out of countenance, but was not at all disagreeable to Martin. First, two pretty girls, very neatly dressed, served them with chocolate, which was frothed exceedingly well. Candide could... Long Stories - Post by : enriquegaribay - Date : May 2012 - Author : Voltaire - Read : 1437

Candide: Or, Optimism - Chapter 24. Of Paquette And Friar Giroflee Candide: Or, Optimism - Chapter 24. Of Paquette And Friar Giroflee

Candide: Or, Optimism - Chapter 24. Of Paquette And Friar Giroflee
CHAPTER XXIV. OF PAQUETTE AND FRIAR GIROFLEEUpon their arrival at Venice, Candide went to search for Cacambo at every inn and coffee-house, and among all the ladies of pleasure, but to no purpose. He sent every day to inquire on all the ships that came in. But there was no news of Cacambo. "What!" said he to Martin, "I have had time to voyage from Surinam to Bordeaux, to go from Bordeaux to Paris, from Paris to Dieppe, from Dieppe to Portsmouth, to coast along Portugal and Spain, to cross the whole Mediterranean, to spend some months, and yet the beautiful... Long Stories - Post by : enriquegaribay - Date : May 2012 - Author : Voltaire - Read : 1579

Candide: Or, Optimism - Chapter 23. Candide And Martin Touched Upon The Coast Of England... Candide: Or, Optimism - Chapter 23. Candide And Martin Touched Upon The Coast Of England...

Candide: Or, Optimism - Chapter 23. Candide And Martin Touched Upon The Coast Of England...
CHAPTER XXIII. CANDIDE AND MARTIN TOUCHED UPON THE COAST OF ENGLAND, AND WHAT THEY SAW THERE"Ah, Pangloss! Pangloss! Ah, Martin! Martin! Ah, my dear Cunegonde, what sort of a world is this?" said Candide on board the Dutch ship. "Something very foolish and abominable," said Martin. "You know England? Are they as foolish there as in France?" "It is another kind of folly," said Martin. "You know that these two nations are at war for a few acres of snow in Canada,(31) and that they spend over this beautiful war much more than Canada is worth. To tell you exactly, whether... Long Stories - Post by : dantefiore - Date : May 2012 - Author : Voltaire - Read : 1963

Candide: Or, Optimism - Chapter 22. What Happened In France To Candide And Martin Candide: Or, Optimism - Chapter 22. What Happened In France To Candide And Martin

Candide: Or, Optimism - Chapter 22. What Happened In France To Candide And Martin
CHAPTER XXII. WHAT HAPPENED IN FRANCE TO CANDIDE AND MARTINCandide stayed in Bordeaux no longer than was necessary for the selling of a few of the pebbles of El Dorado, and for hiring a good chaise to hold two passengers; for he could not travel without his Philosopher Martin. He was only vexed at parting with his sheep, which he left to the Bordeaux Academy of Sciences, who set as a subject for that year's prize, "to find why this sheep's wool was red;" and the prize was awarded to a learned man of the North, who demonstrated by A plus... Long Stories - Post by : dantefiore - Date : May 2012 - Author : Voltaire - Read : 2532

Candide: Or, Optimism - Chapter 21. Candide And Martin, Reasoning, Draw Near The Coast Of France Candide: Or, Optimism - Chapter 21. Candide And Martin, Reasoning, Draw Near The Coast Of France

Candide: Or, Optimism - Chapter 21. Candide And Martin, Reasoning, Draw Near The Coast Of France
CHAPTER XXI. CANDIDE AND MARTIN, REASONING, DRAW NEAR THE COAST OF FRANCEAt length they descried the coast of France. "Were you ever in France, Mr. Martin?" said Candide. "Yes," said Martin, "I have been in several provinces. In some one-half of the people are fools, in others they are too cunning; in some they are weak and simple, in others they affect to be witty; in all, the principal occupation is love, the next is slander, and the third is talking nonsense." "But, Mr. Martin, have you seen Paris?" "Yes, I have. All these kinds are found there. It is a... Long Stories - Post by : dantefiore - Date : May 2012 - Author : Voltaire - Read : 2306

Candide: Or, Optimism - Chapter 20. What Happened At Sea To Candide And Martin Candide: Or, Optimism - Chapter 20. What Happened At Sea To Candide And Martin

Candide: Or, Optimism - Chapter 20. What Happened At Sea To Candide And Martin
CHAPTER XX. WHAT HAPPENED AT SEA TO CANDIDE AND MARTINThe old philosopher, whose name was Martin, embarked then with Candide for Bordeaux. They had both seen and suffered a great deal; and if the vessel had sailed from Surinam to Japan, by the Cape of Good Hope, the subject of moral and natural evil would have enabled them to entertain one another during the whole voyage. Candide, however, had one great advantage over Martin, in that he always hoped to see Miss Cunegonde; whereas Martin had nothing at all to hope. Besides, Candide was possessed of money and jewels, and though... Long Stories - Post by : dantefiore - Date : May 2012 - Author : Voltaire - Read : 1566

Candide: Or, Optimism - Chapter 16. Adventures Of The Two Travellers... Candide: Or, Optimism - Chapter 16. Adventures Of The Two Travellers...

Candide: Or, Optimism - Chapter 16. Adventures Of The Two Travellers...
CHAPTER XVI. ADVENTURES OF THE TWO TRAVELLERS, WITH TWO GIRLS, TWO MONKEYS, AND THE SAVAGES CALLED OREILLONSCandide and his valet had got beyond the barrier, before it was known in the camp that the German Jesuit was dead. The wary Cacambo had taken care to fill his wallet with bread, chocolate, bacon, fruit, and a few bottles of wine. With their Andalusian horses they penetrated into an unknown country they perceived no beaten track. At length they came to a beautiful meadow intersected with purling rills. Here our two adventurers fed their horses. Cacambo proposed to his master to take... Long Stories - Post by : dantefiore - Date : May 2012 - Author : Voltaire - Read : 1031

Candide: Or, Optimism - Chapter 15. How Candide Killed The Brother Of His Dear Cunegonde Candide: Or, Optimism - Chapter 15. How Candide Killed The Brother Of His Dear Cunegonde

Candide: Or, Optimism - Chapter 15. How Candide Killed The Brother Of His Dear Cunegonde
CHAPTER XV. HOW CANDIDE KILLED THE BROTHER OF HIS DEAR CUNEGONDE"I shall have ever present to my memory the dreadful day, on which I saw my father and mother killed, and my sister ravished. When the Bulgarians retired, my dear sister could not be found; but my mother, my father, and myself, with two maid-servants and three little boys all of whom had been slain, were put in a hearse, to be conveyed for interment to a chapel belonging to the Jesuits, within two leagues of our family seat. A Jesuit sprinkled us with some holy water; it was horribly salt;... Long Stories - Post by : dantefiore - Date : May 2012 - Author : Voltaire - Read : 964

Candide: Or, Optimism - Chapter 14. How Candide And Cacambo Were Received By The Jesuits Of Paraguay Candide: Or, Optimism - Chapter 14. How Candide And Cacambo Were Received By The Jesuits Of Paraguay

Candide: Or, Optimism - Chapter 14. How Candide And Cacambo Were Received By The Jesuits Of Paraguay
CHAPTER XIV. HOW CANDIDE AND CACAMBO WERE RECEIVED BY THE JESUITS OF PARAGUAYCandide had brought such a valet with him from Cadiz, as one often meets with on the coasts of Spain and in the American colonies. He was a quarter Spaniard, born of a mongrel in Tucuman; he had been singing-boy, sacristan, sailor, monk, pedlar, soldier, and lackey. His name was Cacambo, and he loved his master, because his master was a very good man. He quickly saddled the two Andalusian horses. "Come, master, let us follow the old woman's advice; let us start, and run without looking behind us."... Long Stories - Post by : dantefiore - Date : May 2012 - Author : Voltaire - Read : 1957

Candide: Or, Optimism - Chapter 13. How Candide Was Forced Away From His Fair Cunegonde... Candide: Or, Optimism - Chapter 13. How Candide Was Forced Away From His Fair Cunegonde...

Candide: Or, Optimism - Chapter 13. How Candide Was Forced Away From His Fair Cunegonde...
CHAPTER XIII. HOW CANDIDE WAS FORCED AWAY FROM HIS FAIR CUNEGONDE AND THE OLD WOMANThe beautiful Cunegonde having heard the old woman's history, paid her all the civilities due to a person of her rank and merit. She likewise accepted her proposal, and engaged all the passengers, one after the other, to relate their adventures; and then both she and Candide allowed that the old woman was in the right. "It is a great pity," said Candide, "that the sage Pangloss was hanged contrary to custom at an _auto-da-fe_; he would tell us most amazing things in regard to the physical... Long Stories - Post by : dantefiore - Date : May 2012 - Author : Voltaire - Read : 1429

Candide: Or, Optimism - Chapter 12. The Adventures Of The Old Woman Continued Candide: Or, Optimism - Chapter 12. The Adventures Of The Old Woman Continued

Candide: Or, Optimism - Chapter 12. The Adventures Of The Old Woman Continued
CHAPTER XII. THE ADVENTURES OF THE OLD WOMAN CONTINUED"Astonished and delighted to hear my native language, and no less surprised at what this man said, I made answer that there were much greater misfortunes than that of which he complained. I told him in a few words of the horrors which I had endured, and fainted a second time. He carried me to a neighbouring house, put me to bed, gave me food, waited upon me, consoled me, flattered me; he told me that he had never seen any one so beautiful as I, and that he never so much regretted... Long Stories - Post by : dantefiore - Date : May 2012 - Author : Voltaire - Read : 2523

Candide: Or, Optimism - Chapter 11. History Of The Old Woman Candide: Or, Optimism - Chapter 11. History Of The Old Woman

Candide: Or, Optimism - Chapter 11. History Of The Old Woman
CHAPTER XI. HISTORY OF THE OLD WOMAN"I had not always bleared eyes and red eyelids; neither did my nose always touch my chin; nor was I always a servant. I am the daughter of Pope Urban X,(10) and of the Princess of Palestrina. Until the age of fourteen I was brought up in a palace, to which all the castles of your German barons would scarcely have served for stables; and one of my robes was worth more than all the magnificence of Westphalia. As I grew up I improved in beauty, wit, and every graceful accomplishment, in the midst of... Long Stories - Post by : dantefiore - Date : May 2012 - Author : Voltaire - Read : 979

Candide: Or, Optimism - Chapter 10. In What Distress Candide, Cunegonde... Candide: Or, Optimism - Chapter 10. In What Distress Candide, Cunegonde...

Candide: Or, Optimism - Chapter 10. In What Distress Candide, Cunegonde...
CHAPTER X. IN WHAT DISTRESS CANDIDE, CUNEGONDE, AND THE OLD WOMAN ARRIVED AT CADIZ; AND OF THEIR EMBARKATION"Who was it that robbed me of my money and jewels?" said Cunegonde, all bathed in tears. "How shall we live? What shall we do? Where find Inquisitors or Jews who will give me more?" "Alas!" said the old woman, "I have a shrewd suspicion of a reverend Grey Friar, who stayed last night in the same inn with us at Badajos. God preserve me from judging rashly, but he came into our room twice, and he set out upon his journey long before... Long Stories - Post by : dantefiore - Date : May 2012 - Author : Voltaire - Read : 3421

Candide: Or, Optimism - Chapter 6. How The Portuguese Made A Beautiful Auto-Da-Fe... Candide: Or, Optimism - Chapter 6. How The Portuguese Made A Beautiful Auto-Da-Fe...

Candide: Or, Optimism - Chapter 6. How The Portuguese Made A Beautiful Auto-Da-Fe...
CHAPTER VI. HOW THE PORTUGUESE MADE A BEAUTIFUL AUTO-DA-FE TO PREVENT ANY FURTHER EARTHQUAKES; AND HOW CANDIDE WAS PUBLICLY WHIPPEDAfter the earthquake had destroyed three-fourths of Lisbon, the sages of that country could think of no means more effectual to prevent utter ruin than to give the people a beautiful _auto-da-fe_(6); for it had been decided by the University of Coimbra, that the burning of a few people alive by a slow fire, and with great ceremony, is an infallible secret to hinder the earth from quaking. FOOTNOTE:(6) P. 23. This _auto-da-fe actually took place, some months after the earthquake, on... Long Stories - Post by : dantefiore - Date : May 2012 - Author : Voltaire - Read : 3144