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Jacob's Room - Chapter 14 Jacob's Room - Chapter 14

Jacob's Room - Chapter 14
"He left everything just as it was," Bonamy marvelled. "Nothingarranged. All his letters strewn about for any one to read. What did heexpect? Did he think he would come back?" he mused, standing in themiddle of Jacob's room.The eighteenth century has its distinction. These houses were built,say, a hundred and fifty years ago. The rooms are shapely, the ceilingshigh; over the doorways a rose or a ram's skull is carved in the wood.Even the panels, painted in raspberry-coloured paint, have theirdistinction.Bonamy took up a bill for a hunting-crop."That seems to be paid," he said.There were Sandra's letters.Mrs. Durrant was taking a... Long Stories - Post by : bunni - Date : February 2011 - Author : Virginia Woolf - Read : 1488

Jacob's Room - Chapter 13 Jacob's Room - Chapter 13

Jacob's Room - Chapter 13
"The Height of the season," said Bonamy.The sun had already blistered the paint on the backs of the green chairsin Hyde Park; peeled the bark off the plane trees; and turned the earthto powder and to smooth yellow pebbles. Hyde Park was circled,incessantly, by turning wheels."The height of the season," said Bonamy sarcastically.He was sarcastic because of Clara Durrant; because Jacob had come backfrom Greece very brown and lean, with his pockets full of Greek notes,which he pulled out when the chair man came for pence; because Jacob wassilent."He has not said a word to show that he is glad to... Long Stories - Post by : David_C_H - Date : February 2011 - Author : Virginia Woolf - Read : 2856

Jacob's Room - Chapter 12 Jacob's Room - Chapter 12

Jacob's Room - Chapter 12
The water fell off a ledge like lead--like a chain with thick whitelinks. The train ran out into a steep green meadow, and Jacob sawstriped tulips growing and heard a bird singing, in Italy.A motor car full of Italian officers ran along the flat road and kept upwith the train, raising dust behind it. There were trees laced togetherwith vines--as Virgil said. Here was a station; and a tremendous leave-taking going on, with women in high yellow boots and odd pale boys inringed socks. Virgil's bees had gone about the plains of Lombardy. Itwas the custom of the ancients to train... Long Stories - Post by : contactme - Date : February 2011 - Author : Virginia Woolf - Read : 1941

Jacob's Room - Chapter 11 Jacob's Room - Chapter 11

Jacob's Room - Chapter 11
"Archer," said Mrs. Flanders with that tenderness which mothers so oftendisplay towards their eldest sons, "will be at Gibraltar to-morrow."The post for which she was waiting (strolling up Dods Hill while therandom church bells swung a hymn tune about her head, the clock strikingfour straight through the circling notes; the glass purpling under astorm-cloud; and the two dozen houses of the village cowering,infinitely humble, in company under a leaf of shadow), the post, withall its variety of messages, envelopes addressed in bold hands, inslanting hands, stamped now with English stamps, again with Colonialstamps, or sometimes hastily dabbed with a yellow bar,... Long Stories - Post by : aWebPro - Date : February 2011 - Author : Virginia Woolf - Read : 2273

Jacob's Room - Chapter 10 Jacob's Room - Chapter 10

Jacob's Room - Chapter 10
Through the disused graveyard in the parish of St. Pancras, Fanny Elmerstrayed between the white tombs which lean against the wall, crossingthe grass to read a name, hurrying on when the grave-keeper approached,hurrying into the street, pausing now by a window with blue china, nowquickly making up for lost time, abruptly entering a baker's shop,buying rolls, adding cakes, going on again so that any one wishing tofollow must fairly trot. She was not drably shabby, though. She woresilk stockings, and silver-buckled shoes, only the red feather in herhat drooped, and the clasp of her bag was weak, for out fell a... Long Stories - Post by : matthewleon - Date : February 2011 - Author : Virginia Woolf - Read : 2510

Jacob's Room - Chapter 9 Jacob's Room - Chapter 9

Jacob's Room - Chapter 9
The Countess of Rocksbier sat at the head of the table alone with Jacob.Fed upon champagne and spices for at least two centuries (four, if youcount the female line), the Countess Lucy looked well fed. Adiscriminating nose she had for scents, prolonged, as if in quest ofthem; her underlip protruded a narrow red shelf; her eyes were small,with sandy tufts for eyebrows, and her jowl was heavy. Behind her (thewindow looked on Grosvenor Square) stood Moll Pratt on the pavement,offering violets for sale; and Mrs. Hilda Thomas, lifting her skirts,preparing to cross the road. One was from Walworth; the other fromPutney.... Long Stories - Post by : inter174 - Date : February 2011 - Author : Virginia Woolf - Read : 3513

Jacob's Room - Chapter 8 Jacob's Room - Chapter 8

Jacob's Room - Chapter 8
About half-past nine Jacob left the house, his door slamming, otherdoors slamming, buying his paper, mounting his omnibus, or, weatherpermitting, walking his road as other people do. Head bent down, a desk,a telephone, books bound in green leather, electric light.... "Freshcoals, sir?" ... "Your tea, sir."... Talk about football, the Hotspurs,the Harlequins; six-thirty Star brought in by the office boy; the rooksof Gray's Inn passing overhead; branches in the fog thin and brittle;and through the roar of traffic now and again a voice shouting:"Verdict--verdict--winner--winner," while letters accumulate in abasket, Jacob signs them, and each evening finds him, as he takes hiscoat... Long Stories - Post by : twilight - Date : February 2011 - Author : Virginia Woolf - Read : 2598

Jacob's Room - Chapter 7 Jacob's Room - Chapter 7

Jacob's Room - Chapter 7
About this time a firm of merchants having dealings with the East put onthe market little paper flowers which opened on touching water. As itwas the custom also to use finger-bowls at the end of dinner, the newdiscovery was found of excellent service. In these sheltered lakes thelittle coloured flowers swam and slid; surmounted smooth slippery waves,and sometimes foundered and lay like pebbles on the glass floor. Theirfortunes were watched by eyes intent and lovely. It is surely a greatdiscovery that leads to the union of hearts and foundation of homes. Thepaper flowers did no less.It must not be thought, though,... Long Stories - Post by : debtfree - Date : February 2011 - Author : Virginia Woolf - Read : 2402

Jacob's Room - Chapter 6 Jacob's Room - Chapter 6

Jacob's Room - Chapter 6
The flames had fairly caught."There's St. Paul's!" some one cried.As the wood caught the city of London was lit up for a second; on othersides of the fire there were trees. Of the faces which came out freshand vivid as though painted in yellow and red, the most prominent was agirl's face. By a trick of the firelight she seemed to have no body. Theoval of the face and hair hung beside the fire with a dark vacuum forbackground. As if dazed by the glare, her green-blue eyes stared at theflames. Every muscle of her face was taut. There was something... Long Stories - Post by : usvisalaw - Date : February 2011 - Author : Virginia Woolf - Read : 3606

Jacob's Room - Chapter 5 Jacob's Room - Chapter 5

Jacob's Room - Chapter 5
"I rather think," said Jacob, taking his pipe from his mouth, "it's inVirgil," and pushing back his chair, he went to the window.The rashest drivers in the world are, certainly, the drivers of post-office vans. Swinging down Lamb's Conduit Street, the scarlet vanrounded the corner by the pillar box in such a way as to graze the kerband make the little girl who was standing on tiptoe to post a letterlook up, half frightened, half curious. She paused with her hand in themouth of the box; then dropped her letter and ran away. It is seldomonly that we see a child... Long Stories - Post by : sterlingmy - Date : February 2011 - Author : Virginia Woolf - Read : 1396

Jacob's Room - Chapter 4 Jacob's Room - Chapter 4

Jacob's Room - Chapter 4
What's the use of trying to read Shakespeare, especially in one of thoselittle thin paper editions whose pages get ruffled, or stuck togetherwith sea-water? Although the plays of Shakespeare had frequently beenpraised, even quoted, and placed higher than the Greek, never since theystarted had Jacob managed to read one through. Yet what an opportunity!For the Scilly Isles had been sighted by Timmy Durrant lying likemountain-tops almost a-wash in precisely the right place. Hiscalculations had worked perfectly, and really the sight of him sittingthere, with his hand on the tiller, rosy gilled, with a sprout of beard,looking sternly at the stars, then... Long Stories - Post by : 36701 - Date : February 2011 - Author : Virginia Woolf - Read : 2098

Jacob's Room - Chapter 3 Jacob's Room - Chapter 3

Jacob's Room - Chapter 3
"This is not a smoking-carriage," Mrs. Norman protested, nervously butvery feebly, as the door swung open and a powerfully built young manjumped in. He seemed not to hear her. The train did not stop before itreached Cambridge, and here she was shut up alone, in a railwaycarriage, with a young man.She touched the spring of her dressing-case, and ascertained that thescent-bottle and a novel from Mudie's were both handy (the young man wasstanding up with his back to her, putting his bag in the rack). Shewould throw the scent-bottle with her right hand, she decided, and tugthe communication cord with her... Long Stories - Post by : jack05 - Date : February 2011 - Author : Virginia Woolf - Read : 802

Jacob's Room - Chapter 2 Jacob's Room - Chapter 2

Jacob's Room - Chapter 2
"MRS. FLANDERS"--"Poor Betty Flanders"--"Dear Betty"--"She's veryattractive still"--"Odd she don't marry again!" "There's Captain Barfootto be sure--calls every Wednesday as regular as clockwork, and neverbrings his wife.""But that's Ellen Barfoot's fault," the ladies of Scarborough said. "Shedon't put herself out for no one.""A man likes to have a son--that we know.""Some tumours have to be cut; but the sort my mother had you bear withfor years and years, and never even have a cup of tea brought up to youin bed."(Mrs. Barfoot was an invalid.)Elizabeth Flanders, of whom this and much more than this had been saidand would be said, was, of... Long Stories - Post by : bunni - Date : February 2011 - Author : Virginia Woolf - Read : 1739

Jacob's Room - Chapter 1 Jacob's Room - Chapter 1

Jacob's Room - Chapter 1
"So of course," wrote Betty Flanders, pressing her heels rather deeperin the sand, "there was nothing for it but to leave."Slowly welling from the point of her gold nib, pale blue ink dissolvedthe full stop; for there her pen stuck; her eyes fixed, and tears slowlyfilled them. The entire bay quivered; the lighthouse wobbled; and shehad the illusion that the mast of Mr. Connor's little yacht was bendinglike a wax candle in the sun. She winked quickly. Accidents were awfulthings. She winked again. The mast was straight; the waves were regular;the lighthouse was upright; but the blot had spread."...nothing for it... Long Stories - Post by : Scott_Doppke - Date : February 2011 - Author : Virginia Woolf - Read : 2220

Night And Day - Chapter 34 Night And Day - Chapter 34

Night And Day - Chapter 34
The lamps were lit; their luster reflected itself in the polishedwood; good wine was passed round the dinner-table; before the meal wasfar advanced civilization had triumphed, and Mr. Hilbery presided overa feast which came to wear more and more surely an aspect, cheerful,dignified, promising well for the future. To judge from the expressionin Katharine's eyes it promised something--but he checked the approachsentimentality. He poured out wine; he bade Denham help himself.They went upstairs and he saw Katharine and Denham abstract themselvesdirectly Cassandra had asked whether she might not play him something--some Mozart? some Beethoven? She sat down to the piano; the... Long Stories - Post by : eclark - Date : February 2011 - Author : Virginia Woolf - Read : 3166

Night And Day - Chapter 33 Night And Day - Chapter 33

Night And Day - Chapter 33
Considering that Mr. Hilbery lived in a house which was accuratelynumbered in order with its fellows, and that he filled up forms, paidrent, and had seven more years of tenancy to run, he had an excuse forlaying down laws for the conduct of those who lived in his house, andthis excuse, though profoundly inadequate, he found useful during theinterregnum of civilization with which he now found himself faced. Inobedience to those laws, Rodney disappeared; Cassandra was dispatchedto catch the eleven-thirty on Monday morning; Denham was seen no more;so that only Katharine, the lawful occupant of the upper rooms,remained, and Mr. Hilbery... Long Stories - Post by : Securenext - Date : February 2011 - Author : Virginia Woolf - Read : 3071

Night And Day - Chapter 32 Night And Day - Chapter 32

Night And Day - Chapter 32
Nobody asked Katharine any questions next day. If cross-examined shemight have said that nobody spoke to her. She worked a little, wrote alittle, ordered the dinner, and sat, for longer than she knew, withher head on her hand piercing whatever lay before her, whether it wasa letter or a dictionary, as if it were a film upon the deep prospectsthat revealed themselves to her kindling and brooding eyes. She roseonce, and going to the bookcase, took out her father's Greekdictionary and spread the sacred pages of symbols and figures beforeher. She smoothed the sheets with a mixture of affectionate amusementand hope.... Long Stories - Post by : richard52az - Date : February 2011 - Author : Virginia Woolf - Read : 1736

Night And Day - Chapter 31 Night And Day - Chapter 31

Night And Day - Chapter 31
The tray which brought Katharine's cup of tea the next morningbrought, also, a note from her mother, announcing that it was herintention to catch an early train to Stratford-on-Avon that very day."Please find out the best way of getting there," the note ran, "andwire to dear Sir John Burdett to expect me, with my love. I've beendreaming all night of you and Shakespeare, dearest Katharine."This was no momentary impulse. Mrs. Hilbery had been dreaming ofShakespeare any time these six months, toying with the idea of anexcursion to what she considered the heart of the civilized world. Tostand six feet above Shakespeare's... Long Stories - Post by : ozventures - Date : February 2011 - Author : Virginia Woolf - Read : 2742

Night And Day - Chapter 30 Night And Day - Chapter 30

Night And Day - Chapter 30
The day was so different from other days to three people in the housethat the common routine of household life--the maid waiting at table,Mrs. Hilbery writing a letter, the clock striking, and the dooropening, and all the other signs of long-established civilizationappeared suddenly to have no meaning save as they lulled Mr. and Mrs.Hilbery into the belief that nothing unusual had taken place. Itchanced that Mrs. Hilbery was depressed without visible cause, unlessa certain crudeness verging upon coarseness in the temper of herfavorite Elizabethans could be held responsible for the mood. At anyrate, she had shut up "The Duchess of Malfi"... Long Stories - Post by : mxthree - Date : February 2011 - Author : Virginia Woolf - Read : 3048

Night And Day - Chapter 29 Night And Day - Chapter 29

Night And Day - Chapter 29
Between twelve and one that Sunday night Katharine lay in bed, notasleep, but in that twilight region where a detached and humorous viewof our own lot is possible; or if we must be serious, our seriousnessis tempered by the swift oncome of slumber and oblivion. She saw theforms of Ralph, William, Cassandra, and herself, as if they were allequally unsubstantial, and, in putting off reality, had gained a kindof dignity which rested upon each impartially. Thus rid of anyuncomfortable warmth of partisanship or load of obligation, she wasdropping off to sleep when a light tap sounded upon her door. A momentlater... Long Stories - Post by : singerone - Date : February 2011 - Author : Virginia Woolf - Read : 2312