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The History Of A Crime - The Third Day - The Massacre - Chapter 14. Ossian And Scipio The History Of A Crime - The Third Day - The Massacre - Chapter 14. Ossian And Scipio

The History Of A Crime - The Third Day - The Massacre - Chapter 14. Ossian And Scipio
CHAPTER XIV. OSSIAN AND SCIPIOArrests grew more numerous.Towards noon a Commissary of Police, named Boudrot, appeared at the divan of the Rue Lepelletier. He was accompanied by the police agent Delahodde. Delahodde was that traitorous socialist writer, who, upon being unmasked, had passed from the Secret Police to the Public Police Service. I knew him, and I record this incident. In 1832 he was a master in the school at which were my two sons, then boys, and he had addressed poetry to me. At the same time he was acting the spy upon me. The Lepelletier divan was the place... Long Stories - Post by : simkl - Date : May 2012 - Author : Victor Hugo - Read : 1535

The History Of A Crime - The Third Day - The Massacre - Chapter 13. The Barricade Of The Rue Thevenot The History Of A Crime - The Third Day - The Massacre - Chapter 13. The Barricade Of The Rue Thevenot

The History Of A Crime - The Third Day - The Massacre - Chapter 13. The Barricade Of The Rue Thevenot
CHAPTER XIII. THE BARRICADE OF THE RUE THEVENOTGeorges Biscarrat was the man who had given the signal for the looting in the Rue de l'Echelle.I had known Georges Biscarrat ever since June, 1848. He had taken part in that disastrous insurrection. I had had an opportunity of being useful to him. He had been captured, and was kneeling before the firing-party; I interfered, and I saved his life, together with that of some others, M., D., D., B., and that brave-hearted architect Rolland, who when an exile, later on, so ably restored the Brussels Palace of Justice.This took place on the... Long Stories - Post by : cclittle - Date : May 2012 - Author : Victor Hugo - Read : 2552

The History Of A Crime - The Third Day - The Massacre - Chapter 12. The Barricade Of The Mairie Of The Fifth Arrondissement The History Of A Crime - The Third Day - The Massacre - Chapter 12. The Barricade Of The Mairie Of The Fifth Arrondissement

The History Of A Crime - The Third Day - The Massacre - Chapter 12. The Barricade Of The Mairie Of The Fifth Arrondissement
CHAPTER XII. THE BARRICADE OF THE MAIRIE OF THE FIFTH ARRONDISSEMENTNational Guards in uniform filled the courtyard of the Mairie of the Fifth Arrondissement. Others came in every moment. An ex-drummer of the Garde Mobile had taken a drum from a lower room at the side of the guard-room, and had beaten the call to arms in the surrounding streets. Towards nine o'clock a group of fourteen or fifteen young men, most of whom were in white blouses, entered the Mairie, shouting, "Long live the Republic!" They were armed with guns. The National Guard received them with shouts of "Down with... Long Stories - Post by : JuvioSuccess - Date : May 2012 - Author : Victor Hugo - Read : 1781

The History Of A Crime - The Third Day - The Massacre - Chapter 11. The Barricade Of The Rue Meslay The History Of A Crime - The Third Day - The Massacre - Chapter 11. The Barricade Of The Rue Meslay

The History Of A Crime - The Third Day - The Massacre - Chapter 11. The Barricade Of The Rue Meslay
CHAPTER XI. THE BARRICADE OF THE RUE MESLAYThe first barricade of the Rue Saint Martin was erected at the junction of the Rue Meslay. A large cart was overturned, placed across the street, and the roadway was unpaved; some flag-stones of the footway were also torn up. This barricade, the advanced work of defence of the whole revolted street, could only form a temporary obstacle. No portion of the piled-up stones was higher than a man. In a good third of the barricade the stones did not reach above the knee. "It will at all events be good enough to get... Long Stories - Post by : Joe_Coon - Date : May 2012 - Author : Victor Hugo - Read : 1514

The History Of A Crime - The Third Day - The Massacre - Chapter 10. My Visit To The Barricade The History Of A Crime - The Third Day - The Massacre - Chapter 10. My Visit To The Barricade

The History Of A Crime - The Third Day - The Massacre - Chapter 10. My Visit To The Barricade
CHAPTER X. MY VISIT TO THE BARRICADEMy coachman deposited me at the corner of Saint Eustache, and said to me, "Here you are in the hornets' nest."He added, "I will wait for you in the Rue de la Vrilliere, near the Place des Victoires. Take your time."I began walking from barricade to barricade.In the first I met De Flotte, who offered to serve me as a guide. There is not a more determined man than De Flotte. I accepted his offer; he took me everywhere where my presence could be of use.On the way he gave me an account of the... Long Stories - Post by : rlscott - Date : May 2012 - Author : Victor Hugo - Read : 2868

The History Of A Crime - The Third Day - The Massacre - Chapter 9. The Porte Saint Martin The History Of A Crime - The Third Day - The Massacre - Chapter 9. The Porte Saint Martin

The History Of A Crime - The Third Day - The Massacre - Chapter 9. The Porte Saint Martin
CHAPTER IX. THE PORTE SAINT MARTINImportant deeds had been already achieved during the morning."It is taking root," Bastide had said.The difficulty is not to spread the flames but to light the fire.It was evident that Paris began to grow ill-tempered. Paris does not get angry at will. She must be in the humor for it. A volcano possesses nerves. The anger was coming slowly, but it was coming. On the horizon might be seen the first glimmering of the eruption.For the Elysee, as for us, the critical moment was drawing nigh. From the preceding evening they were nursing their resources. The... Long Stories - Post by : vbhnl - Date : May 2012 - Author : Victor Hugo - Read : 3117

The History Of A Crime - The Third Day - The Massacre - Chapter 8. The Situation The History Of A Crime - The Third Day - The Massacre - Chapter 8. The Situation

The History Of A Crime - The Third Day - The Massacre - Chapter 8. The Situation
CHAPTER VIII. THE SITUATIONAlthough the fighting tactics of the Committee were, for the reasons which I have already given, not to concentrate all their means of resistance into one hour, or in one particular place, but to spread them over as many points and as many days as possible, each of us knew instinctively, as also the criminals of the Elysee on their side, that the day would be decisive.The moment drew near when the _coup d'etat would storm us from every side, and when we should have to sustain the onslaught of an entire army. Would the people, that great... Long Stories - Post by : best4you - Date : May 2012 - Author : Victor Hugo - Read : 1982

The History Of A Crime - The Third Day - The Massacre - Chapter 7. Items And Interviews The History Of A Crime - The Third Day - The Massacre - Chapter 7. Items And Interviews

The History Of A Crime - The Third Day - The Massacre - Chapter 7. Items And Interviews
CHAPTER VII. ITEMS AND INTERVIEWSLamoriciere on the same morning found means to convey to me by Madame de Courbonne(15) the following information."---- Fortress of Ham.--The Commandant's name is Baudot. His appointment, made by Cavaignac in 1848, was countersigned by Charras. Both are to-day his prisoners. The Commissary of Police, sent by Morny to the village of Ham to watch the movements of the jailer and the prisoners, is Dufaure de Pouillac."(16)I thought when I received this communication that the Commandant Baudot, "the jailer," had connived at its rapid transmission.A sign of the instability of the central power.Lamoriciere, by the same means,... Long Stories - Post by : Ndoki - Date : May 2012 - Author : Victor Hugo - Read : 1481

The History Of A Crime - The Third Day - The Massacre - Chapter 6. Denis Dussoubs The History Of A Crime - The Third Day - The Massacre - Chapter 6. Denis Dussoubs

The History Of A Crime - The Third Day - The Massacre - Chapter 6. Denis Dussoubs
CHAPTER VI. DENIS DUSSOUBSGaston Dussoubs was one of the bravest members of the Left. He was a Representative of the Haute-Vienne. At the time of his first appearance in the Assembly he wore, as formerly did Theophile Gautier, a red waistcoat, and the shudder which Gautier's waistcoat caused among the men of letters in 1830, Gaston Dussoubs' waistcoat caused among the Royalists of 1851. M. Parisis, Bishop of Langres, who would have had no objection to a red hat, was terrified by Gaston Dussoubs' red waistcoat. Another source of horror to the Right was that Dussoubs had, it was said, passed... Long Stories - Post by : runtonk - Date : May 2012 - Author : Victor Hugo - Read : 3559

The History Of A Crime - The Third Day - The Massacre - Chapter 5. A Wavering Ally The History Of A Crime - The Third Day - The Massacre - Chapter 5. A Wavering Ally

The History Of A Crime - The Third Day - The Massacre - Chapter 5. A Wavering Ally
CHAPTER V. A WAVERING ALLYDuring this terribly historical morning of the 4th of December, a day the master was closely observed by his satellites, Louis Bonaparte had shut himself up, but in doing so he betrayed himself. A man who shuts himself up meditates, and for such men to meditate is to premeditate. What could be the premeditation of Louis Bonaparte? What was working in his mind. Questions which all asked themselves, two persons excepted,--Morny, the man of thought; Saint-Arnaud, the man of action.Louis Bonaparte claimed, justly, a knowledge of men. He prided himself upon it, and from a certain point... Long Stories - Post by : cclittle - Date : May 2012 - Author : Victor Hugo - Read : 2504

The History Of A Crime - The Third Day - The Massacre - Chapter 4. Bonaparte's Familiar Spirits The History Of A Crime - The Third Day - The Massacre - Chapter 4. Bonaparte's Familiar Spirits

The History Of A Crime - The Third Day - The Massacre - Chapter 4. Bonaparte's Familiar Spirits
CHAPTER IV. BONAPARTE'S FAMILIAR SPIRITSM. Merimee was vile by nature, he must not be blamed for it.With regard to M. de Morny it is otherwise, he was more worthy; there was something of the brigand in him.M. de Morny was courageous. Brigandage has its sentiments of honor.M. Merimee has wrongly given himself out as one of the confederates of the _coup d'etat_. He had, however, nothing to boast of in this.The truth is that M. Merimee was in no way a confidant. Louis Bonaparte made no useless confidences.Let us add that it is little probable, notwithstanding some slight evidence to the... Long Stories - Post by : codebluenj - Date : May 2012 - Author : Victor Hugo - Read : 1373

The History Of A Crime - The Third Day - The Massacre - Chapter 3. Inside The Elysee The History Of A Crime - The Third Day - The Massacre - Chapter 3. Inside The Elysee

The History Of A Crime - The Third Day - The Massacre - Chapter 3. Inside The Elysee
CHAPTER III. INSIDE THE ELYSEEDuring the morning Dr. Yvan met Dr. Conneau. They were acquainted. They talked together. Yvan belonged to the Left. Conneau belonged to the Elysee. Yvan knew through Conneau the details of what had taken place during the night at the Elysee, which he transmitted to us.One of these details was the following:--An inexorable decree had been compiled, and was about to be placarded. This decree enjoined upon all submission to the _coup d'etat_. Saint-Arnaud, who, as Minister of War, should sign the decree, had drawn it up. He had reached the last paragraph, which ran thus: "Whoever... Long Stories - Post by : Truman - Date : May 2012 - Author : Victor Hugo - Read : 820

The History Of A Crime - The Third Day - The Massacre - Chapter 2. The Proceedings Of The Committee The History Of A Crime - The Third Day - The Massacre - Chapter 2. The Proceedings Of The Committee

The History Of A Crime - The Third Day - The Massacre - Chapter 2. The Proceedings Of The Committee
CHAPTER II. THE PROCEEDINGS OF THE COMMITTEEAs soon as it was daylight we had assembled in the house of our imprisoned colleague, M. Grevy. We had been installed in his private room. Michel de Bourges and myself were seated near the fireplace; Jules Favre and Carnot were writing, the one at a table near the window, the other at a high desk. The Left had invested us with discretionary powers. It became more and more impossible at every moment to meet together again in session. We drew up in its name and remitted to Hingray, so that he might print it... Long Stories - Post by : ben.g - Date : May 2012 - Author : Victor Hugo - Read : 3110

The History Of A Crime - The Third Day - The Massacre - Chapter 1. Those who sleep and He who does not sleep The History Of A Crime - The Third Day - The Massacre - Chapter 1. Those who sleep and He who does not sleep

The History Of A Crime - The Third Day - The Massacre - Chapter 1. Those who sleep and He who does not sleep
CHAPTER I. THOSE WHO SLEEP AND HE WHO DOES NOT SLEEPDuring this night of the 3d and 4th of December, while we who were overcome with fatigue and betrothed to calamity slept an honest slumber, not an eye was closed at the Elysee. An infamous sleeplessness reigned there. Towards two o'clock in the morning the Comte Roguet, after Morny the most intimate of the confidants of the Elysee, an ex-peer of France and a lieutenant-general, came out of Louis Bonaparte's private room; Roguet was accompanied by Saint-Arnaud. Saint-Arnaud, it may be remembered, was at that time Minister of War.Two colonels were... Long Stories - Post by : Joe_Coon - Date : May 2012 - Author : Victor Hugo - Read : 3519

The History Of A Crime - The Second Day - The Struggle - Chapter 11. The End Of The Second Day The History Of A Crime - The Second Day - The Struggle - Chapter 11. The End Of The Second Day

The History Of A Crime - The Second Day - The Struggle - Chapter 11. The End Of The Second Day
CHAPTER XI. THE END OF THE SECOND DAYWe left Marie's house just in time. The regiment charged to track us and to arrest us was approaching. We heard the measured steps of soldiers in the gloom. The streets were dark. We dispersed. I will not speak of a refuge which was refused to us.Less than ten minutes after our departure M. Marie's house was invested. A swarm of guns and swords poured in, and overran it from cellar to attic. "Everywhere! everywhere!" cried the chiefs. The soldiers sought us with considerable energy. Without taking the trouble to lean down and look,... Long Stories - Post by : sbeard - Date : May 2012 - Author : Victor Hugo - Read : 2336

The History Of A Crime - The Second Day - The Struggle - Chapter 10. What Fleury Went To Do At Mazas The History Of A Crime - The Second Day - The Struggle - Chapter 10. What Fleury Went To Do At Mazas

The History Of A Crime - The Second Day - The Struggle - Chapter 10. What Fleury Went To Do At Mazas
CHAPTER X. WHAT FLEURY WENT TO DO AT MAZASDuring the same night towards four o'clock the approaches of the Northern Railway Station were silently invested by two regiments; one of Chasseurs de Vincennes, the other of _Gendarmerie Mobile_. Numerous squads of _sergents de ville installed themselves in the terminus. The station-master was ordered to prepare a special train and to have an engine ready. A certain number of stokers and engineers for night service were retained. No explanation however was vouchsafed to any one, and absolute secrecy was maintained. A little before six o'clock a movement was apparent in the troops.... Long Stories - Post by : rlscott - Date : May 2012 - Author : Victor Hugo - Read : 2735

The History Of A Crime - The Second Day - The Struggle - Chapter 9. The Lightning Begins To Flash Amongst The People The History Of A Crime - The Second Day - The Struggle - Chapter 9. The Lightning Begins To Flash Amongst The People

The History Of A Crime - The Second Day - The Struggle - Chapter 9. The Lightning Begins To Flash Amongst The People
CHAPTER IX. THE LIGHTNING BEGINS TO FLASH AMONGST THE PEOPLEThe evening wore a threatening aspect.Groups were formed on the Boulevards. As night advanced they grew larger and became mobs, which speedily mingled together, and only formed one crowd. An enormous crowd, reinforced and agitated by tributary currents from the side-streets, jostling one against another, surging, stormy, and whence ascended an ominous hum. This hubbub resolved itself into one word, into one name which issued simultaneously from every mouth, and which expressed the whole of the situation: "Soulouque!"(12) Throughout that long line from the Madeleine to the Bastille, the roadway nearly everywhere,... Long Stories - Post by : add2it - Date : May 2012 - Author : Victor Hugo - Read : 962

The History Of A Crime - The Second Day - The Struggle - Chapter 8. Mount Valerien The History Of A Crime - The Second Day - The Struggle - Chapter 8. Mount Valerien

The History Of A Crime - The Second Day - The Struggle - Chapter 8. Mount Valerien
CHAPTER VIII. MOUNT VALERIENOf the two hundred and thirty Representatives prisoners at the barracks of the Quai d'Orsay fifty-three had been sent to Mount Valerien. They loaded them in four police vans. Some few remained who were packed in an omnibus. MM. Benoist d'Azy, Falloux, Piscatory, Vatimesail, were locked in the wheeled cells, as also Eugene Sue and Esquiros. The worthy M. Gustave de Beaumont, a great upholder of the cellular system, rode in a cell vehicle. It is not an undesirable thing, as we have said, that the legislator should taste of the law.The Commandant of Mount Valerien appeared under... Long Stories - Post by : mrtwist - Date : May 2012 - Author : Victor Hugo - Read : 618

The History Of A Crime - The Second Day - The Struggle - Chapter 7. The Archbishop The History Of A Crime - The Second Day - The Struggle - Chapter 7. The Archbishop

The History Of A Crime - The Second Day - The Struggle - Chapter 7. The Archbishop
CHAPTER VII. THE ARCHBISHOPOn this gloomy and tragical day an idea struck one of the people.He was a workman belonging to the honest but almost imperceptible minority of Catholic Democrats. The double exaltation of his mind, revolutionary on one side, mystical on the other, caused him to be somewhat distrusted by the people, even by his comrades and his friends. Sufficiently devout to be called a Jesuit by the Socialists, sufficiently Republican to be called a Red by the Reactionists, he formed an exception in the workshops of the Faubourg. Now, what is needed in these supreme crises to seize and... Long Stories - Post by : sbeard - Date : May 2012 - Author : Victor Hugo - Read : 869

The History Of A Crime - The Second Day - The Struggle - Chapter 6. The Decrees Of The Representatives Who Remained Free The History Of A Crime - The Second Day - The Struggle - Chapter 6. The Decrees Of The Representatives Who Remained Free

The History Of A Crime - The Second Day - The Struggle - Chapter 6. The Decrees Of The Representatives Who Remained Free
CHAPTER VI. THE DECREES OF THE REPRESENTATIVES WHO REMAINED FREEThe text of the judgment which was believed to have been dawn up by the High Court of Justice had been brought to us by the ex-Constituent Martin (of Strasbourg), a lawyer at the Court of Cassation. At the same time we learned what was happening in the Rue Aumaire. The battle was beginning, it was important to sustain it, and to feed it; it was important ever to place the legal resistance by the side of the armed resistance. The members who had met together on the preceding day at the... Long Stories - Post by : gabby - Date : May 2012 - Author : Victor Hugo - Read : 838