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The Advance Of Science In The Last Half-century - Part 5 The Advance Of Science In The Last Half-century - Part 5

The Advance Of Science In The Last Half-century - Part 5
Turning now to the great steps in that progress which the biological sciences have made since 1837, we are met, on the threshold of our epoch, with perhaps the greatest of all--namely, the promulgation by Schwann, in 1839, of the generalisation known as the 'cell theory,' the application and extension of which by a host of subsequent investigators has revolutionised morphology, development, and physiology. Thanks to the immense series of labors thus inaugurated, the following fundamental truths have been established. (Sidenote: Fundamental truths established.) All living bodies contain substances of closely similar physical and chemical composition, which constitute the physical basis... Essays - Post by : DavidDaniels - Date : May 2012 - Author : Thomas Henry Huxley - Read : 2189

The Advance Of Science In The Last Half-century - Part 4 The Advance Of Science In The Last Half-century - Part 4

The Advance Of Science In The Last Half-century - Part 4
When dealing with the doctrine of the ultimate constitution of matter, we found a certain resemblance between the oldest speculations and the newest doctrines of physical philosophers. But there is no such resemblance between the ancient and modern views of motion and its causes, except in so far as the conception of attractive and repulsive forces may be regarded as the modified descendant of the Aristotelian conception of forms. In fact, it is hardly too much to say that the essential and fundamental difference between ancient and modern physical science lies in the ascertainment of the true laws of statics and... Essays - Post by : DavidDaniels - Date : May 2012 - Author : Thomas Henry Huxley - Read : 3400

Scientific And Pseudo-scientific Realism Scientific And Pseudo-scientific Realism

Scientific And Pseudo-scientific Realism
(1887) Next to undue precipitation in anticipating the results of pending investigations, the intellectual sin which is commonest and most hurtful to those who devote themselves to the increase of knowledge is the omission to profit by the experience of their predecessors recorded in the history of science and philosophy. It is true that, at the present day, there is more excuse than at any former time for such neglect. No small labour is needed to raise one's self to the level of the acquisitions already made; and able men, who have achieved thus much, know that, if they devote themselves... Essays - Post by : supershoponline - Date : June 2011 - Author : Thomas Henry Huxley - Read : 1831

Science And Pseudo-science Science And Pseudo-science

Science And Pseudo-science
(1887) In the opening sentences of a contribution to the last number of this Review,(20) the Duke of Argyll has favoured me with a lecture on the proprieties of controversy, to which I should be disposed to listen with more docility if his Grace's precepts appeared to me to be based upon rational principles, or if his example were more exemplary. With respect to the latter point, the Duke has thought fit to entitle his article "Professor Huxley on Canon Liddon," and thus forces into prominence an element of personality, which those who read the paper which is the object of... Essays - Post by : Mark_Austin - Date : June 2011 - Author : Thomas Henry Huxley - Read : 2571

An Episcopal Trilogy An Episcopal Trilogy

An Episcopal Trilogy
(1887) If there is any truth in the old adage that a burnt child dreads the fire, I ought to be very loath to touch a sermon, while the memory of what befell me on a recent occasion, possibly not yet forgotten by the readers of the _Nineteenth Century_, is uneffaced. But I suppose that even the distinguished censor of that unheard-of audacity to which not even the newspaper report of a sermon is sacred, can hardly regard a man of science as either indelicate or presumptuous, if he ventures to offer some comments upon three discourses, specially addressed to the... Essays - Post by : trouseredape - Date : June 2011 - Author : Thomas Henry Huxley - Read : 3183

The Value Of Witness To The Miraculous The Value Of Witness To The Miraculous

The Value Of Witness To The Miraculous
(1889) Charles, or, more properly, Karl, King of the Franks, consecrated Roman Emperor in St. Peter's on Christmas Day, A.D. 800, and known to posterity as the Great (chiefly by his agglutinative Gallicised denomination, of Charlemagne), was a man great in all ways, physically and mentally. Within a couple of centuries after his death Charlemagne became the centre of innumerable legends; and the myth-making process does not seem to have been sensibly interfered with by the existence of sober and truthful histories of the Emperor and of the times which immediately preceded and followed his reign by a contemporary writer who... Essays - Post by : Blamark - Date : June 2011 - Author : Thomas Henry Huxley - Read : 3457

Possibilities And Impossibilities Possibilities And Impossibilities

Possibilities And Impossibilities
(1891) In the course of a discussion which has been going on during the last two years,(46) it has been maintained by the defenders of ecclesiastical Christianity that the demonology of the books of the New Testament is an essential and integral part of the revelation of the nature of the spiritual world promulgated by Jesus of Nazareth. Indeed, if the historical accuracy of the Gospels and of the Acts of the Apostles is to be taken for granted, if the teachings of the Epistles are divinely inspired, and if the universal belief and practice of the primitive Church are the... Essays - Post by : elliott2 - Date : June 2011 - Author : Thomas Henry Huxley - Read : 824

Agnosticism Agnosticism

Agnosticism
(1889) Within the last few months, the public has received much and varied information on the subject of agnostics, their tenets, and even their future. Agnosticism exercised the orators of the Church Congress at Manchester.(51) It has been furnished with a set of "articles" fewer, but not less rigid, and certainly not less consistent than the thirty-nine; its nature has been analysed, and its future severely predicted by the most eloquent of that prophetical school whose Samuel is Auguste Comte. It may still be a question, however, whether the public is as much the wiser as might be expected, considering all... Essays - Post by : otter - Date : June 2011 - Author : Thomas Henry Huxley - Read : 2841

Agnosticism: A Rejoinder Agnosticism: A Rejoinder

Agnosticism: A Rejoinder
(1889) Those who passed from Dr. Wace's article in the last number of the "Nineteenth Century" to the anticipatory confutation of it which followed in "The New Reformation," must have enjoyed the pleasure of a dramatic surprise--just as when the fifth act of a new play proves unexpectedly bright and interesting. Mrs. Ward will, I hope, pardon the comparison, if I say that her effective clearing away of antiquated incumbrances from the lists of the controversy, reminds me of nothing so much as of the action of some neat-handed, but strong-wristed, Phyllis, who, gracefully wielding her long-handled "Turk's head," sweeps away... Essays - Post by : Jeremiah - Date : June 2011 - Author : Thomas Henry Huxley - Read : 777

Agnosticism And Christianity Agnosticism And Christianity

Agnosticism And Christianity
(1889) Nemo ergo ex me scire quaerat, quod me nescire scio, nisi forte ut nescire discat.--AUGUSTINUS, _De Civ. Dei_, xii. 7. (81) The present discussion has arisen out of the use, which has become general in the last few years, of the terms "Agnostic" and "Agnosticism." The people who call themselves "Agnostics" have been charged with doing so because they have not the courage to declare themselves "Infidels." It has been insinuated that they have adopted a new name in order to escape the unpleasantness which attaches to their proper denomination. To this wholly erroneous imputation, I have replied by showing... Essays - Post by : JohnMulligan - Date : June 2011 - Author : Thomas Henry Huxley - Read : 3110

The Keepers Of The Herd Of Swine The Keepers Of The Herd Of Swine

The Keepers Of The Herd Of Swine
(1890) I had fondly hoped that Mr. Gladstone and I had come to an end of disputation, and that the hatchet of war was finally superseded by the calumet, which, as Mr. Gladstone, I believe, objects to tobacco, I was quite willing to smoke for both. But I have had, once again, to discover that the adage that whoso seeks peace will ensue it, is a somewhat hasty generalisation. The renowned warrior with whom it is my misfortune to be opposed in most things has dug up the axe and is on the war-path once more. The weapon has been wielded... Essays - Post by : gabby - Date : June 2011 - Author : Thomas Henry Huxley - Read : 572

Illustrations Of Mr. Gladstone's Controversial Methods Illustrations Of Mr. Gladstone's Controversial Methods

Illustrations Of Mr. Gladstone's Controversial Methods
(1891) The series of essays, in defence of the historical accuracy of the Jewish and Christian Scriptures, contributed by Mr. Gladstone to "Good Words," having been revised and enlarged by their author, appeared last year as a separate volume, under the somewhat defiant title of "The Impregnable Rock of Holy Scripture." The last of these Essays, entitled "Conclusion," contains an attack, or rather several attacks, couched in language which certainly does not err upon the side of moderation or of courtesy, upon statements and opinions of mine. One of these assaults is a deliberately devised attempt, not merely to rouse the... Essays - Post by : imagic - Date : June 2011 - Author : Thomas Henry Huxley - Read : 614

Joseph Priestley Joseph Priestley

Joseph Priestley
1874 If the man to perpetuate whose memory we have this day raised a statue had been asked on what part of his busy life's work he set the highest value, he would undoubtedly have pointed to his voluminous contributions to theology. In season and out of season, he was the steadfast champion of that hypothesis respecting the Divine nature which is termed Unitarianism by its friends and Socinianism by its foes. Regardless of odds, he was ready to do battle with all comers in that cause; and if no adversaries entered the lists, he would sally forth to seek them.... Essays - Post by : ozventures - Date : April 2011 - Author : Thomas Henry Huxley - Read : 2603

Science And Culture Science And Culture

Science And Culture
1880 Six years ago, as some of my present hearers may remember, I had the privilege of addressing a large assemblage of the inhabitants of this city, who had gathered together to do honour to the memory of their famous townsman, Joseph Priestley; (1) and, if any satisfaction attaches to posthumous glory, we may hope that the manes of the burnt-out philosopher were then finally appeased. No man, however, who is endowed with a fair share of common sense, and not more than a fair share of vanity, will identify either contemporary or posthumous fame with the highest good; and Priestley's... Essays - Post by : ozventures - Date : April 2011 - Author : Thomas Henry Huxley - Read : 796

On Science And Art In Relation To Education On Science And Art In Relation To Education

On Science And Art In Relation To Education
1882 When a man is honoured by such a request as that which reached me from the authorities of your institution some time ago, I think the first thing that occurs to him is that which occurred to those who were bidden to the feast in the Gospel--to begin to make an excuse; and probably all the excuses suggested on that famous occasion crop up in his mind one after the other, including his "having married a wife," as reasons for not doing what he is asked to do. But, in my own case, and on this particular occasion, there were... Essays - Post by : AquaBird - Date : April 2011 - Author : Thomas Henry Huxley - Read : 2130

Universities: Actual And Ideal Universities: Actual And Ideal

Universities: Actual And Ideal
(1874) Elected by the suffrages of your four Nations Rector of the ancient University of which you are scholars, I take the earliest opportunity which has presented itself since my restoration to health, of delivering the Address which, by long custom, is expected of the holder of my office. My first duty in opening that Address, is to offer you my most hearty thanks for the signal honour you have conferred upon me--an honour of which, as a man unconnected with you by personal or by national ties, devoid of political distinction, and a plebeian who stands by his order, I... Essays - Post by : mare2 - Date : April 2011 - Author : Thomas Henry Huxley - Read : 2953

Address On University Education Address On University Education

Address On University Education
ADDRESS ON UNIVERSITY EDUCATION (1) (1876) The actual work of the University founded in this city by the well-considered munificence of Johns Hopkins commences to-morrow, and among the many marks of confidence and good-will which have been bestowed upon me in the United States, there is none which I value more highly than that conferred by the authorities of the University when they invited me to deliver an address on such an occasion. For the event which has brought us together is, in many respects, unique. A vast property is handed over to an administrative body, hampered by no conditions save... Essays - Post by : magichearts - Date : April 2011 - Author : Thomas Henry Huxley - Read : 2936

On The Study Of Biology On The Study Of Biology

On The Study Of Biology
1876 It is my duty to-night to speak about the study of Biology, and while it may be that there are many of my audience who are quite familiar with that study, yet as a lecturer of some standing, it would, I know by experience, be very bad policy on my part to suppose such to be extensively the case. On the contrary, I must imagine that there are many of you who would like to know what Biology is; that there are others who have that amount of information, but would nevertheless gladly hear why it should be worth their... Essays - Post by : homebizgateway - Date : April 2011 - Author : Thomas Henry Huxley - Read : 1284

On Elementary Instruction In Physiology On Elementary Instruction In Physiology

On Elementary Instruction In Physiology
1877 The chief ground upon which I venture to recommend that the teaching of elementary physiology should form an essential part of any organised course of instruction in matters pertaining to domestic economy, is, that a knowledge of even the elements of this subject supplies those conceptions of the constitution and mode of action of the living body, and of the nature of health and disease, which prepare the mind to receive instruction from sanitary science. It is, I think, eminently desirable that the hygienist and the physician should find something in the public mind to which they can appeal; some... Essays - Post by : reflextrading - Date : April 2011 - Author : Thomas Henry Huxley - Read : 3056

On Medical Education - 1870 On Medical Education - 1870

On Medical Education - 1870
It has given me sincere pleasure to be here today, at the desire of your highly respected President and the Council of the College. In looking back upon my own past, I am sorry to say that I have found that it is a quarter of a century since I took part in those hopes and in those fears by which you have all recently been agitated, and which now are at an end. But, although so long a time has elapsed since I was moved by the same feelings, I beg leave to assure you that my sympathy with both... Essays - Post by : CONSTANCE - Date : April 2011 - Author : Thomas Henry Huxley - Read : 967