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The Household Wreck - Part 7 The Household Wreck - Part 7

The Household Wreck - Part 7
It was just striking twelve o'clock as we entered the lane where the carriage was drawn up. Rain, about the profoundest I had ever witnessed, was falling. Though near to midsummer, the night had been unusually dark to begin with, and from the increasing rain had become much more so. We could see nothing; and at first we feared that some mistake had occurred as to the station of the carriage--in which case we might have sought for it vainly through the intricate labyrinth of the streets in that quarter. I first descried it by the light of a torch, reflected... Essays - Post by : welshbeef - Date : May 2012 - Author : Thomas De Quincey - Read : 1278

The Household Wreck - Part 6 The Household Wreck - Part 6

The Household Wreck - Part 6
To return to the narrative. Agnes had not, nor could have, the most remote suspicion of this Barratt's connection with the shop which he had not accidentally entered; and the sudden appearance of this wretch it was, at the very moment of finding herself charged with so vile and degrading an offence, that contributed most of all to rob her of her natural firmness, by suddenly revealing to her terrified heart the depth of the conspiracy which thus yawned like a gulf below her. And not only had this sudden horror, upon discovering a guilty design in what before had seemed... Essays - Post by : welshbeef - Date : May 2012 - Author : Thomas De Quincey - Read : 3126

The Household Wreck - Part 5 The Household Wreck - Part 5

The Household Wreck - Part 5
On the 8th of April I had fallen ill, and it was now actually the 2d of June. Oh! sickening calculation! revolting register of hours! for in that same moment which brought back this one recollection, perhaps by steadying my brain, rushed back in a torrent all the other dreadful remembrances of the period, and now the more so, because, though the event was still uncertain as regarded my knowledge, it must have become dreadfully certain as regarded the facts of the case, and the happiness of all who were concerned. Alas! one little circumstance too painfully assured me that this... Essays - Post by : welshbeef - Date : May 2012 - Author : Thomas De Quincey - Read : 3551

The Household Wreck - Part 4 The Household Wreck - Part 4

The Household Wreck - Part 4
The office, and all the purlieus of the office, were occupied by a dense crowd. That, perhaps, was always the case, more or less, at this time of day; but at present the crowd was manifestly possessed by a more than ordinary interest; and there was a unity in this possessing interest; all were talking on the same subject, the case in which Agnes had so recently appeared in some character or other; and by this time it became but too certain in the character of an accused person. Pity was the prevailing sentiment amongst the mob; but the opinions varied... Essays - Post by : welshbeef - Date : May 2012 - Author : Thomas De Quincey - Read : 2519

The Household Wreck - Part 3 The Household Wreck - Part 3

The Household Wreck - Part 3
One o'clock had arrived; fifteen minutes after, I strolled into the garden, and began to look over the little garden-gate in expectation of every moment descrying Agnes in the distance. Half an hour passed, and for ten minutes more I was tolerably quiet. From this time till half- past two I became constantly more agitated--_agitated, perhaps, is too strong a word--but I was restless and anxious beyond what I should have chosen to acknowledge. Still I kept arguing, What is half an hour? what is an hour? A thousand things might have occurred to cause that delay, without needing to suppose... Essays - Post by : welshbeef - Date : May 2012 - Author : Thomas De Quincey - Read : 967

The Household Wreck - Part 2 The Household Wreck - Part 2

The Household Wreck - Part 2
On the seventeenth birthday of Agnes we were married. Oh! calendar of everlasting months--months that, like the mighty rivers, shall flow on for ever, immortal as thou, Nile, or Danube, Euphrates, or St. Lawrence! and ye, summer and winter, day and night fore do you bring round continually your signs, and seasons, and revolving hours, that still point and barb the anguish of local recollections, telling me of this and that celestial morning that never shall return, and of too blessed expectations, travelling like yourselves through a heavenly zodiac of changes, till at once and for ever they sank into the... Essays - Post by : welshbeef - Date : May 2012 - Author : Thomas De Quincey - Read : 3024

The Household Wreck - Part 1 The Household Wreck - Part 1

The Household Wreck - Part 1
'To be weak,' we need not the great archangel's voice to tell us, '_is to be miserable_.' All weakness is suffering and humiliation, no matter for its mode or its subject. Beyond all other weakness, therefore, and by a sad prerogative, as more miserable than what is most miserable in all, that capital weakness of man which regards the _tenure of his enjoyments and his power to protect, even for a moment, the crown of flowers--flowers, at the best, how frail and few! --which sometimes settles upon his haughty brow. There is no end, there never will be an end, of... Essays - Post by : welshbeef - Date : May 2012 - Author : Thomas De Quincey - Read : 2894

The Spanish Nun - Part 2 The Spanish Nun - Part 2

The Spanish Nun - Part 2
From Vittoria, Kate was guided by a carrier to Valladolid. Luckily, as it seemed at first, but it made little difference in the end, here, at Valladolid, were the King and his Court. Consequently, there was plenty of regiments and plenty of regimental bands. Attracted by one of these, Catalina was quietly listening to the music, when some street ruffians, in derision of the gay colors and the form of her forest-made costume-- (rascals! one would like to have seen what sort of trousers _they would have made with no better scissors!)--began to pelt her with stones. Ah, my friends, of... Essays - Post by : welshbeef - Date : May 2012 - Author : Thomas De Quincey - Read : 2052

The Spanish Nun - Part 1 The Spanish Nun - Part 1

The Spanish Nun - Part 1
Why is it that _Adventures are so generally repulsive to people of meditative minds? It is for the same reason that any other want of law, that any other anarchy is repulsive. Floating passively from action to action, as helplessly as a withered leaf surrendered to the breath of winds, the human spirit (out of which comes all grandeur of human motions) is exhibited in mere _Adventures_, as either entirely laid asleep, or as acting only by lower organs that regulate the _means_, whilst the _ends are derived from alien sources, and are imperiously predetermined. It is a case of exception,... Essays - Post by : welshbeef - Date : May 2012 - Author : Thomas De Quincey - Read : 1168

The Caesars - Chapter 6 The Caesars - Chapter 6

The Caesars - Chapter 6
CHAPTER VITo return, however, to our sketch of the Caesars--at the head of the third series we place Decius. He came to the throne at a moment of great public embarrassment. The Goths were now beginning to press southwards upon the empire. Dacia they had ravaged for some time; "and here," says a German writer, "observe the shortsightedness of the Emperor Trajan." Had he left the Dacians in possession of their independence, they would, under their native kings, have made head against the Goths. But, being compelled to assume the character of Roman citizens, they had lost their warlike qualities. From... Nonfictions - Post by : pearlventures - Date : May 2012 - Author : Thomas De Quincey - Read : 1552

The Caesars - Chapter 5 The Caesars - Chapter 5

The Caesars - Chapter 5
CHAPTER VThe Roman empire, and the Roman emperors, it might naturally be supposed by one who had not as yet traversed that tremendous chapter in the history of man, would be likely to present a separate and almost equal interest. The empire, in the first place, as the most magnificent monument of human power which our planet has beheld, must for that single reason, even though its records were otherwise of little interest, fix upon itself the very keenest gaze from all succeeding ages to the end of time. To trace the fortunes and revolutions of that unrivalled monarchy over which... Nonfictions - Post by : pearlventures - Date : May 2012 - Author : Thomas De Quincey - Read : 2234

The Caesars - Chapter 1 The Caesars - Chapter 1

The Caesars - Chapter 1
CHAPTER IThe character of the first Caesar has perhaps never been worse appreciated than by him who in one sense described it best--that is, with most force and eloquence wherever he really _did comprehend it. This was Lucan, who has nowhere exhibited more brilliant rhetoric, nor wandered more from the truth, than in the contrasted portraits of Caesar and Pompey. The famous line, "_Nil actum reputans si quid superesset agendum_," is a fine feature of the real character, finely expressed. But if it had been Lucan's purpose (as possibly, with a view to Pompey's benefit, in some respects it was) utterly... Nonfictions - Post by : p00kie - Date : May 2012 - Author : Thomas De Quincey - Read : 2767

The Caesars - The Caesars The Caesars - The Caesars

The Caesars - The Caesars
The condition of the Roman Emperors has never yet been fully appreciated; nor has it been sufficiently perceived in what respects it was absolutely unique. There was but one Rome: no other city, as we are satisfied by the collation of many facts, either of ancient or modern times, has ever rivalled this astonishing metropolis in the grandeur of magnitude; and not many--if we except the cities of Greece, none at all--in the grandeur of architectural display. Speaking even of London, we ought in all reason to say--the _Nation of London, and not the City of London; but of Rome in... Nonfictions - Post by : p00kie - Date : May 2012 - Author : Thomas De Quincey - Read : 3289

Confessions Of An English Opium-eater - PART II - FOOTNOTES Confessions Of An English Opium-eater - PART II - FOOTNOTES

Confessions Of An English Opium-eater - PART II - FOOTNOTES
{1} "Not yet _recorded_," I say; for there is one celebrated man of the present day, who, if all be true which is reported of him, has greatly exceeded me in quantity.{2} A third exception might perhaps have been added; and my reason for not adding that exception is chiefly because it was only in his juvenile efforts that the writer whom I allude to expressly addressed hints to philosophical themes; his riper powers having been all dedicated (on very excusable and very intelligible grounds, under the present direction of the popular mind in England) to criticism and the Fine Arts.... Nonfictions - Post by : marktse - Date : April 2012 - Author : Thomas De Quincey - Read : 3172

Confessions Of An English Opium-eater - PART II - APPENDIX Confessions Of An English Opium-eater - PART II - APPENDIX

Confessions Of An English Opium-eater - PART II - APPENDIX
From the "London Magazine" for December 1822.The interest excited by the two papers bearing this title, in our numbers for September and October 1821, will have kept our promise of a Third Part fresh in the remembrance of our readers. That we are still unable to fulfil our engagement in its original meaning will, we, are sure, be matter of regret to them as to ourselves, especially when they have perused the following affecting narrative. It was composed for the purpose of being appended to an edition of the Confessions in a separate volume, which is already before the public, and... Nonfictions - Post by : JKinakin - Date : April 2012 - Author : Thomas De Quincey - Read : 2853

Confessions Of An English Opium-eater - PART II - THE PAINS OF OPIUM Confessions Of An English Opium-eater - PART II - THE PAINS OF OPIUM

Confessions Of An English Opium-eater - PART II - THE PAINS OF OPIUM
As when some great painter dips His pencil in the gloom of earthquake and eclipse.SHELLEY'S _Revolt of Islam_.Reader, who have thus far accompanied me, I must request your attention to a brief explanatory note on three points:1. For several reasons I have not been able to compose the notes for this part of my narrative into any regular and connected shape. I give the notes disjointed as I find them, or have now drawn them up from memory. Some of them point to their own date, some I have dated, and some are undated. Whenever it could answer my purpose to... Nonfictions - Post by : LiquidationLots - Date : April 2012 - Author : Thomas De Quincey - Read : 721

Confessions Of An English Opium-eater - PART II - INTRODUCTION TO THE PAINS OF OPIUM Confessions Of An English Opium-eater - PART II - INTRODUCTION TO THE PAINS OF OPIUM

Confessions Of An English Opium-eater - PART II - INTRODUCTION TO THE PAINS OF OPIUM
Courteous, and I hope indulgent, reader (for all _my readers must be indulgent ones, or else I fear I shall shock them too much to count on their courtesy), having accompanied me thus far, now let me request you to move onwards for about eight years; that is to say, from 1804 (when I have said that my acquaintance with opium first began) to 1812. The years of academic life are now over and gone--almost forgotten; the student's cap no longer presses my temples; if my cap exist at all, it presses those of some youthful scholar, I trust, as happy... Nonfictions - Post by : Jeff_Walker - Date : April 2012 - Author : Thomas De Quincey - Read : 1629

Confessions Of An English Opium-eater - PART II - THE PLEASURES OF OPIUM Confessions Of An English Opium-eater - PART II - THE PLEASURES OF OPIUM

Confessions Of An English Opium-eater - PART II - THE PLEASURES OF OPIUM
It is so long since I first took opium that if it had been a trifling incident in my life I might have forgotten its date; but cardinal events are not to be forgotten, and from circumstances connected with it I remember that it must be referred to the autumn of 1804. During that season I was in London, having come thither for the first time since my entrance at college. And my introduction to opium arose in the following way. From an early age I had been accustomed to wash my head in cold water at least once a day:... Nonfictions - Post by : eagltrax - Date : April 2012 - Author : Thomas De Quincey - Read : 977

Confessions Of An English Opium-eater - PART II - INTRODUCTION Confessions Of An English Opium-eater - PART II - INTRODUCTION

Confessions Of An English Opium-eater - PART II - INTRODUCTION
From the London Magazine for October 1821.So then, Oxford Street, stony-hearted step-mother! thou that listenest to the sighs of orphans and drinkest the tears of children, at length I was dismissed from thee; the time was come at last that I no more should pace in anguish thy never-ending terraces, no more should dream and wake in captivity to the pangs of hunger. Successors too many, to myself and Ann, have doubtless since then trodden in our footsteps, inheritors of our calamities; other orphans than Ann have sighed; tears have been shed by other children; and thou, Oxford Street, hast since... Nonfictions - Post by : jasonmangrum - Date : April 2012 - Author : Thomas De Quincey - Read : 3406

Confessions Of An English Opium-eater - PART I - PRELIMINARY CONFESSIONS (Continued) Confessions Of An English Opium-eater - PART I - PRELIMINARY CONFESSIONS (Continued)

Confessions Of An English Opium-eater - PART I - PRELIMINARY CONFESSIONS (Continued)
I do not often weep: for not only do my thoughts on subjects connected with the chief interests of man daily, nay hourly, descend a thousand fathoms "too deep for tears;" not only does the sternness of my habits of thought present an antagonism to the feelings which prompt tears--wanting of necessity to those who, being protected usually by their levity from any tendency to meditative sorrow, would by that same levity be made incapable of resisting it on any casual access of such feelings; but also, I believe that all minds which have contemplated such objects as deeply as I... Nonfictions - Post by : erisynne - Date : April 2012 - Author : Thomas De Quincey - Read : 846