Full Online Books
BOOK CATEGORIES
Authors Authors Short Stories Short Stories Long Stories Long Stories Funny Stories Funny Stories Love Stories Love Stories Stories For Kids Stories For Kids Poems Poems Essays Essays Nonfictions Nonfictions Plays Plays Folktales Folktales Fairy Tales Fairy Tales Fables Fables Learning Kitchen Learning Kitchen
LINKS
Valid XHTML 1.0 Transitional Free Classified Website Without Registration Free Classified Website Daniel Company
Twitter Twitter Add book
donate
Full Online Book HomeAuthor Thomas BulfinchPage 1
Famous Authors (View All Authors)

The Age Of Chivalry - GLOSSARY The Age Of Chivalry - GLOSSARY

The Age Of Chivalry - GLOSSARY
Abdalrahman, founder of the independent Ommiad (Saracenic) powerin Spain, conquered at Tours by Charles MartelAberfraw, scene of nuptials of Branwen and MatholchAbsyrtus, younger brother of MedeaAbydos, a town on the Hellespont, nearly opposite to SestosAbyla, Mount, or Columna, a mountain in Morocco, near Ceuta, nowcalled Jebel Musa or Ape's Hill, forming the Northwesternextremity of the African coast opposite Gibraltar (See Pillars ofHercules)Acestes, son of a Trojan woman who was sent by her father toSicily, that she might not be devoured by the monsters whichinfested the territory of TroyAcetes, Bacchanal captured by PentheusAchates, faithful friend and companion of AeneasAchelous, river-god of the... Nonfictions - Post by : Floyd_Fisher - Date : January 2011 - Author : Thomas Bulfinch - Read : 2660

The Age Of Chivalry - C. HERO MYTHS OF THE BRITISH RACE - Robin Hood The Age Of Chivalry - C. HERO MYTHS OF THE BRITISH RACE - Robin Hood

The Age Of Chivalry - C. HERO MYTHS OF THE BRITISH RACE - Robin Hood
Among the earliest heirlooms of the Anglo-Saxon tongue are thesongs and legends of Robin Hood and his merry outlaws, which havecharmed readers young and old for more than six hundred years.These entertaining stories date back to the time when Chaucerwrote his "Canterbury Tales," when the minstrel and scribe stoodin the place of the more prim and precise modern printed book.The question of whether or not Robin Hood was a real person hasbeen asked for many years, just as a similar question has beenasked about William Tell and others whom everyone would muchrather accept on faith. It cannot be answered by a... Nonfictions - Post by : tbirdsall - Date : January 2011 - Author : Thomas Bulfinch - Read : 3422

The Age Of Chivalry - C. HERO MYTHS OF THE BRITISH RACE - Hereward the Wake The Age Of Chivalry - C. HERO MYTHS OF THE BRITISH RACE - Hereward the Wake

The Age Of Chivalry - C. HERO MYTHS OF THE BRITISH RACE - Hereward the Wake
In Hereward the Wake (or "Watchful") is found one of those heroeswhose date can be ascertained with a fair amount of exactness andyet in whose story occur mythological elements which seem tobelong to all ages. The folklore of primitive races is a greatstorehouse whence a people can choose tales and heroic deeds toglorify its own national hero, careless that the same tales anddeeds have done duty for other peoples and other heroes. Hence ithappens that Hereward the Saxon, a patriot hero as real and actualas Nelson or George Washington, whose deeds were recorded in proseand verse within forty years of his... Nonfictions - Post by : daveb - Date : January 2011 - Author : Thomas Bulfinch - Read : 3031

The Age Of Chivalry - C. HERO MYTHS OF THE BRITISH RACE - Cuchulain, Champion of Ireland The Age Of Chivalry - C. HERO MYTHS OF THE BRITISH RACE - Cuchulain, Champion of Ireland

The Age Of Chivalry - C. HERO MYTHS OF THE BRITISH RACE - Cuchulain, Champion of Ireland
Among all the early literatures of Europe, there are two which, atexactly opposite corners of the continent, display most strikinglysimilar characteristics. These are the Greek and the Irish, andthe legend of the Irish champion Cuchulain, which well illustratesthe similarity of the literatures, bears so close a resemblance tothe story of Achilles as to win for this hero the title of "theIrish Achilles." Certainly in reckless courage, power of inspiringdread, sense of personal merit, and frankness of speech the Irishhero is fully equal to the mighty Greek.Cuchulain was the nephew of King Conor of Ulster, son of hissister Dechtire, and it is... Nonfictions - Post by : jmenet - Date : January 2011 - Author : Thomas Bulfinch - Read : 561

The Age Of Chivalry - C. HERO MYTHS OF THE BRITISH RACE - Beowulf The Age Of Chivalry - C. HERO MYTHS OF THE BRITISH RACE - Beowulf

The Age Of Chivalry - C. HERO MYTHS OF THE BRITISH RACE - Beowulf
Notable among the names of heroes of the British race is that ofBeowulf, which appeals to all English-speaking people in a veryspecial way, since he is the one hero in whose story we may seethe ideals of our English forefathers before they left theirContinental home to cross to the islands of Britain.Although this hero had distinguished himself by numerous feats ofstrength during his boyhood and early youth, it was as thedeliverer of Hrothgar, king of Denmark, from the monster Grendelthat he first gained wide renown. Grendel was half monster andhalf man, and had his abode in the fen-fastnesses in the vicinityof... Nonfictions - Post by : rajhu - Date : January 2011 - Author : Thomas Bulfinch - Read : 2546

The Age Of Chivalry - B. THE MABINOGEON - Chapter XIII. Taliesin The Age Of Chivalry - B. THE MABINOGEON - Chapter XIII. Taliesin

The Age Of Chivalry - B. THE MABINOGEON - Chapter XIII. Taliesin
Gwyddno Garanhir was sovereign of Gwaelod, a territory borderingon the sea. And he possessed a weir upon the strand between Dyviand Aberystwyth, near to his own castle, and the value of anhundred pounds was taken in that weir every May eve. And Gwyddnohad an only son named Elphin, the most hapless of youths, and themost needy. And it grieved his father sore, for he thought that hewas born in an evil hour. By the advice of his council, his fatherhad granted him the drawing of the weir that year, to see if goodluck would ever befall him, and to give him... Nonfictions - Post by : prodigy - Date : January 2011 - Author : Thomas Bulfinch - Read : 2227

The Age Of Chivalry - B. THE MABINOGEON - Chapter XII. Kilwich and Olwen (Continued) The Age Of Chivalry - B. THE MABINOGEON - Chapter XII. Kilwich and Olwen (Continued)

The Age Of Chivalry - B. THE MABINOGEON - Chapter XII. Kilwich and Olwen (Continued)
All that day they journeyed until the evening, and then theybeheld a vast castle, which was the largest in the world. And lo!a black man, larger than three of the men of this world, came outfrom the castle. And they spoke unto him, and said, "O man, whosecastle is that?" "Stupid are ye, truly, O men! There is no one inthe world that does not know that this is the castle of Gwernachthe Giant." "What treatment is there for guests and strangers thatalight in that castle?" "O chieftain, Heaven protect thee! Noguests ever returned thence alive, and no one may enter... Nonfictions - Post by : lilbiz - Date : January 2011 - Author : Thomas Bulfinch - Read : 2984

The Age Of Chivalry - B. THE MABINOGEON - Chapter XI. Kilwich and Olwen The Age Of Chivalry - B. THE MABINOGEON - Chapter XI. Kilwich and Olwen

The Age Of Chivalry - B. THE MABINOGEON - Chapter XI. Kilwich and Olwen
Kilydd, a son of Prince Kelyddon, desired a wife as a helpmate,and the wife that he chose was Goleudid, the daughter of PrinceAnlawd. And after their union the people put up prayers that theymight have an heir. And they had a son through the prayers of thepeople; and called his name Kilwich.After this the boy's mother, Goleudid, the daughter of PrinceAnlawd, fell sick. Then she called her husband to her, and said tohim, "Of this sickness I shall die, and thou wilt take anotherwife. Now wives are the gift of the Lord, but it would be wrongfor thee to harm thy... Nonfictions - Post by : mlmnotes - Date : January 2011 - Author : Thomas Bulfinch - Read : 1905

The Age Of Chivalry - B. THE MABINOGEON - Chapter X. Manawyddan The Age Of Chivalry - B. THE MABINOGEON - Chapter X. Manawyddan

The Age Of Chivalry - B. THE MABINOGEON - Chapter X. Manawyddan
Pwyll and Rhiannon had a son, whom they named Pryderi. And when hewas grown up, Pwyll, his father, died. And Pryderi married Kicva,the daughter of Gwynn Gloy.Now Manawyddan returned from the war in Ireland, and he found thathis cousin had seized all his possessions, and much grief andheaviness came upon him. "Alas! woe is me!" he exclaimed; "thereis none save myself without a home and a resting-place." "Lord,"said Pryderi, "be not so sorrowful. Thy cousin is king of theIsland of the Mighty, and though he has done thee wrong, thou hastnever been a claimant of land or possessions." "Yea," answered he,"but... Nonfictions - Post by : Brian_B - Date : January 2011 - Author : Thomas Bulfinch - Read : 2312

The Age Of Chivalry - B. THE MABINOGEON - Chapter IX. Branwen, the Daughter of Llyr The Age Of Chivalry - B. THE MABINOGEON - Chapter IX. Branwen, the Daughter of Llyr

The Age Of Chivalry - B. THE MABINOGEON - Chapter IX. Branwen, the Daughter of Llyr
Bendigeid Vran, the son of Llyr, was the crowned king of thisisland, and he was exalted from the crown of London. And oneafternoon he was at Harlech, in Ardudwy, at his court; and he satupon the rock of Harlech, looking over the sea. And with him werehis brother, Manawyddan, the son of Llyr, and his brothers by themother's side, Nissyen and Evnissyen, and many nobles likewise, aswas fitting to see around a king. His two brothers by the mother'sside were the sons of Euroswydd, and one of these youths was agood youth, and of gentle nature, and would make peace between... Nonfictions - Post by : andrewteg - Date : January 2011 - Author : Thomas Bulfinch - Read : 1266

The Age Of Chivalry - B. THE MABINOGEON - Chapter VIII. Pwyll, Prince of Dyved The Age Of Chivalry - B. THE MABINOGEON - Chapter VIII. Pwyll, Prince of Dyved

The Age Of Chivalry - B. THE MABINOGEON - Chapter VIII. Pwyll, Prince of Dyved
Once upon a time Pwyll was at Narberth, his chief palace afeast had been prepared for him, and with him was a great host ofmen. And after the first meal Pwyll arose to walk; and he went tothe top of a mound that was above the palace, and was calledGorsedd Arberth. "Lord," said one of the court, "it is peculiar tothe mound that whosoever sits upon it cannot go thence withouteither receiving wounds or blows, or else seeing a wonder." "Ifear not to receive wounds or blows," said Pwyll; "but as to thewonder, gladly would I see it. I will... Nonfictions - Post by : sweetsuccess - Date : January 2011 - Author : Thomas Bulfinch - Read : 2479

The Age Of Chivalry - B. THE MABINOGEON - Chapter VII. Geraint, the Son of Erbin (Continued) The Age Of Chivalry - B. THE MABINOGEON - Chapter VII. Geraint, the Son of Erbin (Continued)

The Age Of Chivalry - B. THE MABINOGEON - Chapter VII. Geraint, the Son of Erbin (Continued)
Geraint, as he had been used to do when he was at Arthur's court,frequented tournaments. And he became acquainted with valiant andmighty men, until he had gained as much fame there as he hadformerly done elsewhere. And he enriched his court, and hiscompanions, and his nobles, with the best horses and the bestarms, and with the best and most valuable jewels, and he ceasednot until his fame had flown over the face of the whole kingdom. "Before Geraint, the scourge of the enemy, I saw steeds white with foam, And after the shout... Nonfictions - Post by : clivejive - Date : January 2011 - Author : Thomas Bulfinch - Read : 1498

The Age Of Chivalry - B. THE MABINOGEON - Chapter VI. Geraint, the Son of Erbin (Continued) The Age Of Chivalry - B. THE MABINOGEON - Chapter VI. Geraint, the Son of Erbin (Continued)

The Age Of Chivalry - B. THE MABINOGEON - Chapter VI. Geraint, the Son of Erbin (Continued)
Now this is how Arthur hunted the stag. The men and the dogs weredivided into hunting-parties, and the dogs were let loose upon thestag. And the last dog that was let loose was the favorite dog ofArthur; Cavall was his name. And he left all the other dogs behindhim and turned the stag. And at the second turn the stag cametoward the hunting-party of Arthur. And Arthur set upon him; andbefore he could be slain by any other, Arthur cut off his head.Then they sounded the death-horn for slaying and they all gatheredround.They came Kadyriath to Arthur and spoke to him.... Nonfictions - Post by : infinityrose - Date : January 2011 - Author : Thomas Bulfinch - Read : 2232

The Age Of Chivalry - B. THE MABINOGEON - Chapter V. Geraint, the Son of Erbin The Age Of Chivalry - B. THE MABINOGEON - Chapter V. Geraint, the Son of Erbin

The Age Of Chivalry - B. THE MABINOGEON - Chapter V. Geraint, the Son of Erbin
Arthur was accustomed to hold his court at Caerleon upon Usk. Andthere he held it seven Easters and five Christmases. And once upona time he held his court there at Whitsuntide. For Caerleon wasthe place most easy of access in his dominions, both by sea and byland. And there were assembled nine crowned kings, who were histributaries, and likewise earls and barons. For they were hisinvited guests at all the high festivals, unless they wereprevented by any great hinderatice. And when he was at Caerleonholding his court, thirteen churches were set apart for mass. Andthus they were appointed: one church for... Nonfictions - Post by : ChrisSwyer - Date : January 2011 - Author : Thomas Bulfinch - Read : 874

The Age Of Chivalry - B. THE MABINOGEON - Chapter IV. The Lady of the Fountain (Continued) The Age Of Chivalry - B. THE MABINOGEON - Chapter IV. The Lady of the Fountain (Continued)

The Age Of Chivalry - B. THE MABINOGEON - Chapter IV. The Lady of the Fountain (Continued)
GAWAIN'S ADVENTUREIt befell that, as Gawain went forth one day with King Arthur, heperceived him to be very sad and sorrowful. And Gawain was muchgrieved to see Arthur in his state, and he questioned him, saying,"O my lord, what has befallen thee?" "In sooth, Gawain," saidArthur, "I am grieved concerning Owain, whom I have lost thesethree years; and I shall certainly die if the fourth year passwithout my seeing him. Now I am sure that it is through the talewhich Kynon, the son of Clydno, related, that I have lost Owain.""There is no need for thee," said Gawain, "to summon to... Nonfictions - Post by : gemstar - Date : January 2011 - Author : Thomas Bulfinch - Read : 693

The Age Of Chivalry - B. THE MABINOGEON - Chapter III. The Lady of the Fountain (Continued) The Age Of Chivalry - B. THE MABINOGEON - Chapter III. The Lady of the Fountain (Continued)

The Age Of Chivalry - B. THE MABINOGEON - Chapter III. The Lady of the Fountain (Continued)
(Footnote: Amongst all the characters of early British historynone is the more interesting, or occupies more conspicuous place,than the hero of this tale. Urien, his father, was prince ofRheged, a district comprising the present Cumberland and part ofthe adjacent country. His valor, and the consideration in which hewas held, are a frequent theme of Bardic song, and form thesubject of several very spirited odes by Taliesin. Among theTriads there is one relating to him; it is thus translated:"Three Knights of Battle were in court of Arthur Cadwr, the Earlof Cornwall, Launcelot du Lac, and Owain, the son of Urien. Andthis was... Nonfictions - Post by : edbuckson - Date : January 2011 - Author : Thomas Bulfinch - Read : 930

The Age Of Chivalry - B. THE MABINOGEON - Chapter II. The Lady of the Fountain The Age Of Chivalry - B. THE MABINOGEON - Chapter II. The Lady of the Fountain

The Age Of Chivalry - B. THE MABINOGEON - Chapter II. The Lady of the Fountain
King Arthur was at Caerleon upon Usk; and one day he sat in hischamber, and with him were Owain, the son of Urien, and Kynon, theson of Clydno, and Kay, the son of Kyner, and Guenever and herhandmaidens at needlework by the window. In the centre of thechamher King Arthur sat, upon a seat of green rushes, (Footnote:The use of green rushes in apartments was by no means peculiar tothe court of Carleon upon Usk. Our ancestors had a greatpredilection for them, and they seem to have constituted anessential article, not only of comfort, but of luxury. The customof strewing the... Nonfictions - Post by : lloven2 - Date : January 2011 - Author : Thomas Bulfinch - Read : 3064

The Age Of Chivalry - B. THE MABINOGEON - Chapter I. The Britons The Age Of Chivalry - B. THE MABINOGEON - Chapter I. The Britons

The Age Of Chivalry - B. THE MABINOGEON - Chapter I. The Britons
The earliest inhabitants of Britain are supposed to have been abranch of that great family known in history by the designation ofCelts. Cambria, which is a frequent name for Wales, is thought tobe derived from Cymri, the name which the Welsh traditions applyto an immigrant people who entered the island from the adjacentcontinent. This name is thought to be identical with those ofCimmerians and Cimbri, under which the Greek and Roman historiansdescribe a barbarous people, who spread themselves from the northof the Euxine over the whole of Northwestern Europe.The origin of the names Wales and Welsh has been much canvassed.Some writers... Nonfictions - Post by : websmar2 - Date : January 2011 - Author : Thomas Bulfinch - Read : 2510

The Age Of Chivalry - B. THE MABINOGEON - Introductory Note The Age Of Chivalry - B. THE MABINOGEON - Introductory Note

The Age Of Chivalry - B. THE MABINOGEON - Introductory Note
It has been well known to the literati and antiquarians of Europethat there exist in the great public libraries voluminousmanuscripts of romances and tales once popular, but which on theinvention of printing had already become antiquated, and falleninto neglect. They were therefore never printed, and seldomperused even by the learned, until about half a century ago, whenattention was again directed to them, and they were found verycurious monuments of ancient manners, habits, and modes ofthinking. Several have since been edited, some by individuals, asSir Walter Scott and the poet Southey, others by antiquariansocieties. The class of readers which could be counted... Nonfictions - Post by : butch_cassidi - Date : January 2011 - Author : Thomas Bulfinch - Read : 2793

The Age Of Chivalry - A. KING ARTHUR AND HIS KNIGHTS - Chapter XXIII. Morte d'Arthur The Age Of Chivalry - A. KING ARTHUR AND HIS KNIGHTS - Chapter XXIII. Morte d'Arthur

The Age Of Chivalry - A. KING ARTHUR AND HIS KNIGHTS - Chapter XXIII. Morte d'Arthur
MORTE D'ARTHURSir Modred was left ruler of all England, and he caused letters tobe written, as if from beyond sea, that King Arthur was slain inbattle. So he called a Parliament, and made himself be crownedking; and he took the queen Guenever, and said plainly that hewould wed her, but she escaped from him and took refuge in theTower of London. And Sir Modred went and laid siege about theTower of London, and made great assaults thereat, but all mightnot avail him. Then came word to Sir Modred that King Arthur hadraised the siege of Sir Launcelot, and was coming home.... Nonfictions - Post by : joekumar2003 - Date : January 2011 - Author : Thomas Bulfinch - Read : 2751