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The Stillwater Tragedy - Chapter 23 The Stillwater Tragedy - Chapter 23

The Stillwater Tragedy - Chapter 23
CHAPTER XXIIIWhen the down express arrived at Stillwater, that night, two passengers stepped from the rear car to the platform: one was Richard Shackford, and the other a commercial traveler, whose acquaintance Richard had made the previous evening on the Fall River boat. There were no hacks in waiting at the station, and Richard found his politeness put to a severe test when he saw himself obliged to pilot his companion part of the way to the hotel, which lay--it seemed almost maliciously--in a section of the town remote from the Slocums'. Curbing his impatience, Richard led the stranger through several... Long Stories - Post by : jasonroland - Date : May 2012 - Author : Thomas Bailey Aldrich - Read : 1823

The Stillwater Tragedy - Chapter 19 The Stillwater Tragedy - Chapter 19

The Stillwater Tragedy - Chapter 19
CHAPTER XIXMr. Slocum, who had partly risen from the chair, sank back into his seat. "Good God!" he said, turning very pale. "Are you mad?" Mr. Taggett realized the cruel shock which the pronouncing of that name must have caused Mr. Slocum. Mr. Taggett had meditated his line of action, and had decided that the most merciful course was brusquely to charge young Shackford with the crime, and allow Mr. Slocum to sustain himself for a while with the indignant disbelief which would be natural to him, situated as he was. He would then in a manner be prepared for the... Long Stories - Post by : jasonroland - Date : May 2012 - Author : Thomas Bailey Aldrich - Read : 2320

The Stillwater Tragedy - Chapter 18 The Stillwater Tragedy - Chapter 18

The Stillwater Tragedy - Chapter 18
CHAPTER XVIIIThe general effect on Stillwater of Mr. Shackford's death and the peculiar circumstances attending the tragedy have been set forth in the earlier chapters of this narrative. The influence which that event exerted upon several persons then but imperfectly known to the reader is now to occupy us. On the conclusion of the strike, Richard had returned, in the highest spirits, to his own rooms in Lime Street; but the quiet week that followed found him singularly depressed. His nerves had been strung to their utmost tension during those thirteen days of suspense; he had assumed no light responsibility in... Long Stories - Post by : gharlow - Date : May 2012 - Author : Thomas Bailey Aldrich - Read : 693

The Stillwater Tragedy - Chapter 17 The Stillwater Tragedy - Chapter 17

The Stillwater Tragedy - Chapter 17
CHAPTER XVIIDuring the first and second days of the strike, Stillwater presented an animated and even a festive appearance. Throngs of operatives in their Sunday clothes strolled through the streets, or lounged at the corners chatting with other groups; some wandered into the suburbs, and lay in the long grass under the elms. Others again, though these were few, took to the turnpike or the railroad track, and tramped across country. It is needless to say that the bar-room of the tavern was crowded from early morning down to the hour when the law compelled Mr. Snelling to shut off his... Long Stories - Post by : gharlow - Date : May 2012 - Author : Thomas Bailey Aldrich - Read : 2738

The Stillwater Tragedy - Chapter 16 The Stillwater Tragedy - Chapter 16

The Stillwater Tragedy - Chapter 16
CHAPTER XVIThere is no solitude which comes so near being tangible as that of a vast empty workshop, crowded a moment since. The busy, intense life that has gone from it mysteriously leaves behind enough of itself to make the stillness poignant. One might imagine the invisible ghost of doomed Toil wandering from bench to bench, and noiselessly fingering the dropped tools, still warm from the workman's palm. Perhaps this impalpable presence is the artisan's anxious thought, stolen back to brood over the uncompleted task. Though Mr. Slocum had spoken lightly of Slocum's Yard with only one workman in it, when... Long Stories - Post by : gharlow - Date : May 2012 - Author : Thomas Bailey Aldrich - Read : 822

The Stillwater Tragedy - Chapter 15 The Stillwater Tragedy - Chapter 15

The Stillwater Tragedy - Chapter 15
CHAPTER XV"Since we are in for it," said Mr. Slocum the next morning, "put the case to them squarely." Mr. Slocum's vertebrae had stiffened over night. "Leave that to me, sir," Richard replied. "I have been shaping out in my mind a little speech which I flatter myself will cover the points. They have brought this thing upon themselves, and we are about to have the clearest of understandings. I never saw the men quieter." "I don't altogether admire that. It looks as if they hadn't any doubt as to the issue." "The clearest-headed have no doubt; they know as well... Long Stories - Post by : gharlow - Date : May 2012 - Author : Thomas Bailey Aldrich - Read : 3503

The Stillwater Tragedy - Chapter 14 The Stillwater Tragedy - Chapter 14

The Stillwater Tragedy - Chapter 14
CHAPTER XIVOn the third morning after Torrini's expulsion from the yard, Mr. Slocum walked into the studio with a printed slip in his hand. A similar slip lay crumpled under a work-bench Richard had tossed it. Mr. Slocum's kindly visage was full of trouble and perplexity as he raised his eyes from the paper, which he had been re-reading on the way up-stairs. "Look at that!" "Yes," remarked Richard, "I have been honored with one of those documents." "What does it mean?" "It means business." The paper in question contained a series of resolutions unanimously adopted at a meeting of... Long Stories - Post by : gharlow - Date : May 2012 - Author : Thomas Bailey Aldrich - Read : 2201

The Stillwater Tragedy - Chapter 13 The Stillwater Tragedy - Chapter 13

The Stillwater Tragedy - Chapter 13
CHAPTER XIIIAfter a turn through the shops to assure himself that order was restored, Richard withdrew in the direction of his studio. Margaret was standing at the head of the stairs, half hidden by the scarlet creeper which draped that end of the veranda. "What are you doing there?" said Richard looking up with a bright smile. "Oh, Richard, I saw it all!" "You didn't see anything worth having white cheeks about." "But he struck you . . . with the knife, did he not?" said Margaret, clinging to his arm anxiously. "He didn't have a knife, dear; only a small... Long Stories - Post by : gharlow - Date : May 2012 - Author : Thomas Bailey Aldrich - Read : 1880

The Stillwater Tragedy - Chapter 9 The Stillwater Tragedy - Chapter 9

The Stillwater Tragedy - Chapter 9
CHAPTER IXTowards the close of his second year with Mr. Slocum, Richard was assigned a work-room by himself, and relieved of his accountant's duties. His undivided energies were demanded by the carving department, which had proved a lucrative success. The rear of the lot on which Mr. Slocum's house stood was shut off from the marble yard by a high brick wall pierced with a private door for Mr. Slocum's convenience. Over the kitchen in the extension, which reached within a few feet of the wall, was a disused chamber, approachable on the outside by a flight of steps leading to... Long Stories - Post by : beautbiz - Date : May 2012 - Author : Thomas Bailey Aldrich - Read : 913

The Stillwater Tragedy - Chapter 8 The Stillwater Tragedy - Chapter 8

The Stillwater Tragedy - Chapter 8
CHAPTER VIIIThe six months which followed Richard's installment in the office at Slocum's Yard were so crowded with novel experience that he scarcely noted their flight. The room at the Durgins, as will presently appear, turned out an unfortunate arrangement; but everything else had prospered. Richard proved an efficient aid to Mr. Simms, who quietly shifted the pay-roll to the younger man's shoulders. This was a very complicated account to keep, involving as it did a separate record of each employee's time and special work. An ancient bookkeeper parts lightly with such trifles when he has a capable assistant. It also... Long Stories - Post by : Barry_Garhammer - Date : May 2012 - Author : Thomas Bailey Aldrich - Read : 2180

The Stillwater Tragedy - Chapter 7 The Stillwater Tragedy - Chapter 7

The Stillwater Tragedy - Chapter 7
CHAPTER VIIRichard made an early start that morning in search of employment, and duplicated the failure of the previous day. Nobody wanted him. If nobody wanted him in the village where he was born and bred, a village of counting-rooms and workshops, was any other place likely to need him? He had only one hope, if it could be called a hope; at any rate, he had treated it tenderly as such and kept it for the last. He would apply to Rowland Slocum. Long ago, when Richard was an urchin making pot-hooks in the lane, the man used occasionally to... Long Stories - Post by : Barry_Garhammer - Date : May 2012 - Author : Thomas Bailey Aldrich - Read : 2182

The Stillwater Tragedy - Chapter 6 The Stillwater Tragedy - Chapter 6

The Stillwater Tragedy - Chapter 6
CHAPTER VIAfter a lapse of four years, during which he had as completely vanished out of the memory of Stillwater as if he had been lying all the while in the crowded family tomb behind the South Church, Richard Shackford reappeared one summer morning at the door of his cousin's house in Welch's Court. Mr. Shackford was absent at the moment, and Mrs. Morganson, an elderly deaf woman, who came in for a few hours every day to do the house-work, was busy in the extension. Without announcing himself, Richard stalked up-stairs to the chamber in the gable, and went directly... Long Stories - Post by : Barry_Garhammer - Date : May 2012 - Author : Thomas Bailey Aldrich - Read : 3612

The Stillwater Tragedy - Chapter 5 The Stillwater Tragedy - Chapter 5

The Stillwater Tragedy - Chapter 5
CHAPTER VThe humblest painter of real life, if he could have his desire, would select a picturesque background for his figures; but events have an inexorable fashion for choosing their own landscape. In the present instance it is reluctantly conceded that there are few uglier or more commonplace towns in New England than Stillwater,--a straggling, overgrown village, with whose rural aspects are curiously blended something of the grimness and squalor of certain shabby city neighborhoods. Being of comparatively recent date, the place has none of those colonial associations which, like sprigs of lavender in an old chest of drawers, are a... Long Stories - Post by : Barry_Garhammer - Date : May 2012 - Author : Thomas Bailey Aldrich - Read : 991

The Stillwater Tragedy - Chapter 4 The Stillwater Tragedy - Chapter 4

The Stillwater Tragedy - Chapter 4
CHAPTER IVA sorely perplexed man sat there, bending over his papers by the lamp-light. Mr. Taggett had established himself at the Shackford house on his arrival, preferring it to the hotel he would have been subjected to the curiosity of the guests and to endless annoyances. Up to this moment, perhaps not a dozen persons in the place had had more than a passing glimpse of him. He was a very busy man, working at his desk from morning until night, and then taking only a brief walk, for exercise in some unfrequented street. His meals were sent in from... Long Stories - Post by : Barry_Garhammer - Date : May 2012 - Author : Thomas Bailey Aldrich - Read : 3556

The Stillwater Tragedy - Chapter 3 The Stillwater Tragedy - Chapter 3

The Stillwater Tragedy - Chapter 3
CHAPTER IIIOn the afternoon of the following day Mr. Shackford was duly buried. The funeral, under the direction of Mr. Richard Shackford, who acted as chief mourner and was sole mourner by right of kinship, took place in profound silence. The carpenters, who had lost a day on Bishop's new stables, intermitted their sawing and hammering while the services were in progress; the steam was shut off in the iron-mills, and no clinking of the chisel was heard in the marble yard for an hour, during which many of the shops had their shutters up. Then, when all was over, the... Long Stories - Post by : Barry_Garhammer - Date : May 2012 - Author : Thomas Bailey Aldrich - Read : 1010

Thalia Thalia

Thalia
A MIDDLE-AGED LYRICAL POET IS SUPPOSED TO BE TAKING FINAL LEAVE OF THE MUSE OF COMEDY. SHE HAS BROUGHT HIM HIS HAT AND GLOVES, AND IS ABSTRACTEDLY PICKING A THREAD OF GOLD HAIR FROM HIS COAT SLEEVE AS HE BEGINS TO SPEAK: I say it under the rose-- oh, thanks!--yes, under the laurel, We part lovers, not foes; we are not going to quarrel. We have too long been friends on foot and in gilded coaches, Now that... Poems - Post by : Closure - Date : August 2011 - Author : Thomas Bailey Aldrich - Read : 3591

L'eau Dormante L'eau Dormante

L'eau Dormante
Curled up and sitting on her feet, Within the window's deep embrasure, Is Lydia; and across the street, A lad, with eyes of roguish azure, Watches her buried in her book. In vain he tries to win a look, And from the trellis over there Blows sundry kisses through the air, Which miss the mark, and fall unseen, Uncared for. Lydia is thirteen. My lad, if you, without abuse, Will take advice from one who's wiser, And put his... Poems - Post by : kferneau - Date : August 2011 - Author : Thomas Bailey Aldrich - Read : 2070

An Elective Course An Elective Course

An Elective Course
LINES FOUND AMONG THE PAPERS OF A HARVARD UNDERGRADUATE The bloom that lies on Fanny's cheek Is all my Latin, all my Greek; The only sciences I know Are frowns that gloom and smiles that glow; Siberia and Italy Lie in her sweet geography; No scholarship have I but such As teaches me to love her much. Why should I strive to read the skies, Who know the midnight of her eyes? Why should I go so very far To learn what heavenly bodies are! Not Berenice's starry... Poems - Post by : Rooster - Date : August 2011 - Author : Thomas Bailey Aldrich - Read : 2957

The Menu The Menu

The Menu
I beg you come to-night and dine. A welcome waits you, and sound wine-- The Roederer chilly to a charm, As Juno's breath the claret warm, The sherry of an ancient brand. No Persian pomp, you understand-- A soup, a fish, two meats, and then A salad fit for aldermen (When aldermen, alas, the days! Were really worth their mayonnaise); A dish of grapes whose clusters won Their bronze in Carolinian sun; Next, cheese--for you the Neufchatel, A bit of Cheshire likes me well; Cafe au lait... Poems - Post by : RobertR - Date : August 2011 - Author : Thomas Bailey Aldrich - Read : 2560

At A Reading At A Reading

At A Reading
The spare Professor, grave and bald, Began his paper. It was called, I think, "A Brief Historic Glance At Russia, Germany, and France." A glance, but to my best belief 'Twas almost anything but brief-- A wide survey, in which the earth Was seen before mankind had birth; Strange monsters basked them in the sun, Behemoth, armored glyptodon, And in the dawn's unpractised ray The transient dodo winged its way; Then, by degrees, through silt and slough, We reached Berlin--I don't know how. The good Professor's... Poems - Post by : billhawkins - Date : August 2011 - Author : Thomas Bailey Aldrich - Read : 3044