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Woodstock; Or, The Cavalier - Chapter THE THIRTY-EIGHTH Woodstock; Or, The Cavalier - Chapter THE THIRTY-EIGHTH

Woodstock; Or, The Cavalier - Chapter THE THIRTY-EIGHTH
CHAPTER THE THIRTY-EIGHTHMy life was of a piece. Spent in your service--dying at your feet. DON SEBASTIAN.Years rush by us like the wind. We see not whence the eddy comes, nor whitherward it is tending, and we seem ourselves to witness their flight without a sense that we are changed; and yet Time is beguiling man of his strength, as the winds rob the woods of their foliage.After the marriage of Alice and Markham Everard, the old knight resided near them, in an ancient manor-house, belonging to the redeemed portion of his estate Joceline and Phoebe, now man and wife,... Long Stories - Post by : shish1 - Date : April 2012 - Author : Sir Walter Scott - Read : 2814

Woodstock; Or, The Cavalier - Chapter THE THIRTY-SEVENTH Woodstock; Or, The Cavalier - Chapter THE THIRTY-SEVENTH

Woodstock; Or, The Cavalier - Chapter THE THIRTY-SEVENTH
CHAPTER THE THIRTY-SEVENTHMost gracious prince, good Cannyng cried, Leave vengeance to our God, And lay the iron rule aside, Be thine the olive rod. BALLAD OF SIR CHARLES BAWDIN.The hour appointed for execution had been long past, and it was about five in the evening when the Protector summoned Pearson to his presence. He went with fear and reluctance, uncertain how he might be received. After remaining about a quarter of an hour, the aide-de-camp returned to Victor Lee's parlour he found the old soldier, Zerubbabel Robins, in attendance for his return."How is Oliver?" said the old man, anxiously."Why, well,"... Long Stories - Post by : grodem - Date : April 2012 - Author : Sir Walter Scott - Read : 1569

Woodstock; Or, The Cavalier - Chapter THE THIRTY-SIXTH Woodstock; Or, The Cavalier - Chapter THE THIRTY-SIXTH

Woodstock; Or, The Cavalier - Chapter THE THIRTY-SIXTH
CHAPTER THE THIRTY-SIXTHBut let us now, like soldiers on the watch, Put the soul's armour on, alike prepared For all a soldier's warfare brings. JOANNA BAILLIE.The reader will recollect, that when Rochecliffe and Joceline were made prisoners, the party which escorted them had two other captives in their train, Colonel Everard, namely, and the Rev. Nehemiah Holdenough. When Cromwell had obtained entrance into Woodstock, and commenced his search after the fugitive Prince, the prisoners were placed in what had been an old guardroom, and which was by its strength well calculated to serve for a prison, and a guard was placed... Long Stories - Post by : hansof - Date : April 2012 - Author : Sir Walter Scott - Read : 2415

Woodstock; Or, The Cavalier - Chapter THE THIRTY-FIFTH Woodstock; Or, The Cavalier - Chapter THE THIRTY-FIFTH

Woodstock; Or, The Cavalier - Chapter THE THIRTY-FIFTH
CHAPTER THE THIRTY-FIFTHA barren title hast thou bought too dear, Why didst thou tell me that thou wert a king? HENRY IV. PART I.Oliver Cromwell arose from his seat as the two veteran soldiers, Zerubbabel Robins and Merciful Strickalthrow, introduced into the apartment the prisoner, whom they held by the arms, and fixed his stern hazel eye on Albert long before he could give vent to the ideas which were swelling in his bosom. Exultation was the most predominant."Art not thou," he at length said, "that Egyptian which, before these days, madest an uproar, and leddest out into the wilderness many... Long Stories - Post by : gnash - Date : April 2012 - Author : Sir Walter Scott - Read : 652

Woodstock; Or, The Cavalier - Chapter THE THIRTY-FOURTH Woodstock; Or, The Cavalier - Chapter THE THIRTY-FOURTH

Woodstock; Or, The Cavalier - Chapter THE THIRTY-FOURTH
CHAPTER THE THIRTY-FOURTHThe King, therefore, for his defence Against the furious Queen, At Woodstock builded such a bower, As never yet was seen. Most curiously that bower was built, Of stone and timber strong; An hundred and fifty doors Did to this bower belong; And they so cunningly contrived, With turnings round about, That none but with a clew of thread Could enter in or out. BALLAD OF FAIR ROSAMOND.The tradition of the country, as well as some historical evidence, confirmed the opinion that there existed, within the old Royal Lodge at Woodstock, a labyrinth, or connected series of subterranean passages,... Long Stories - Post by : bretf68 - Date : April 2012 - Author : Sir Walter Scott - Read : 2608

Woodstock; Or, The Cavalier - Chapter THE THIRTY-THIRD Woodstock; Or, The Cavalier - Chapter THE THIRTY-THIRD

Woodstock; Or, The Cavalier - Chapter THE THIRTY-THIRD
CHAPTER THE THIRTY-THIRDBut see, his face is black, and full of blood; His eye-balls farther out than when he lived, Staring full ghastly, like a strangled man; His hair uprear'd--his nostrils stretch'd with struggling, His hands abroad display'd, as one who grasp'd And tugg'd for life, and was by strength subdued. HENRY VI. PART I.Had those whose unpleasant visit Sir Henry expected come straight to the Lodge, instead of staying for three hours at Woodstock, they would have secured their prey. But the Familist, partly to prevent the King's escape, partly to render himself of more importance in the affair, had... Long Stories - Post by : lowtar28 - Date : April 2012 - Author : Sir Walter Scott - Read : 542

Woodstock; Or, The Cavalier - Chapter THE THIRTY SECOND Woodstock; Or, The Cavalier - Chapter THE THIRTY SECOND

Woodstock; Or, The Cavalier - Chapter THE THIRTY SECOND
CHAPTER THE THIRTY SECONDCase ye, case ye,--on with your vizards. HENRY IV.The company whom we had left in Victor Lee's parlour were about to separate for the night, and had risen to take a formal leave of each other, when a tap was heard at the hall-door. Albert, the vidette of the party, hastened to open it, enjoining, as he left the room, the rest to remain quiet, until he had ascertained the cause of the knocking. When he gained the portal, he called to know who was there, and what they wanted at so late an hour."It is only me,"... Long Stories - Post by : Prophet - Date : April 2012 - Author : Sir Walter Scott - Read : 2809

Woodstock; Or, The Cavalier - Chapter THE THIRTY-FIRST Woodstock; Or, The Cavalier - Chapter THE THIRTY-FIRST

Woodstock; Or, The Cavalier - Chapter THE THIRTY-FIRST
CHAPTER THE THIRTY-FIRST"Were my son William here but now, He wadna fail the pledge." Wi' that in at the door there ran A ghastly-looking page-- "I saw them, master, O! I saw, Beneath the thornie brae, Of black-mail'd warriors many a rank; 'Revenge!' he cried, 'and gae.'" HENRY MACKENZIE.The little party at the Lodge were assembled at supper, at the early hour of eight o'clock. Sir Henry Lee, neglecting the food that was placed on the table, stood by a lamp on the chimney-piece, and read a letter with mournful attention."Does my son write to you more particularly than to me,... Long Stories - Post by : scdayton - Date : April 2012 - Author : Sir Walter Scott - Read : 1085

Woodstock; Or, The Cavalier - Chapter THE THIRTIETH Woodstock; Or, The Cavalier - Chapter THE THIRTIETH

Woodstock; Or, The Cavalier - Chapter THE THIRTIETH
CHAPTER THE THIRTIETH_Cassio_. That thrust had been my enemy indeed, But that my coat is better than thou know'st. OTHELLO.On the dark October night succeeding the evening on which Tomkins was slain, Colonel Everard, besides his constant attendant Roger Wildrake, had Master Nehemiah Holdenough with him as a guest at supper. The devotions of the evening having been performed according to the Presbyterian fashion, a light entertainment, and a double quart of burnt claret, were placed before his friends at nine o'clock, an hour unusually late. Master Holdenough soon engaged himself in a polemical discourse against Sectaries and Independents, without being... Long Stories - Post by : norms09 - Date : April 2012 - Author : Sir Walter Scott - Read : 3065

Woodstock; Or, The Cavalier - Chapter THE TWENTY-NINTH Woodstock; Or, The Cavalier - Chapter THE TWENTY-NINTH

Woodstock; Or, The Cavalier - Chapter THE TWENTY-NINTH
CHAPTER THE TWENTY-NINTHRuffian, let go that rude uncivil touch! TWO GENTLEMEN OF VERONA.At this time we should give some account of the other actors in our drama, the interest due to the principal personages having for some time engrossed our attention exclusively.We are, therefore, to inform the reader, that the lingering longings of the Commissioners, who had been driven forth of their proposed paradise of Woodstock, not by a cherub indeed, but, as they thought, by spirits of another sort, still detained them in the vicinity. They had, indeed, left the little borough under pretence of indifferent accommodation. The more palpable... Long Stories - Post by : karinm - Date : April 2012 - Author : Sir Walter Scott - Read : 3450

Woodstock; Or, The Cavalier - Chapter THE TWENTY-EIGHTH Woodstock; Or, The Cavalier - Chapter THE TWENTY-EIGHTH

Woodstock; Or, The Cavalier - Chapter THE TWENTY-EIGHTH
CHAPTER THE TWENTY-EIGHTHThis is the place, the centre of the grove; Here stands the oak, the monarch of the wood. JOHN HOME.The sun had risen on the broad boughs of the forest, but without the power of penetrating into its recesses, which hung rich with heavy dewdrops, and were beginning on some of the trees to exhibit the varied tints of autumn; it being the season when Nature, like a prodigal whose race is well-nigh run, seems desirous to make up in profuse gaiety and variety of colours, for the short space which her splendour has then to endure. The birds... Long Stories - Post by : npredford - Date : April 2012 - Author : Sir Walter Scott - Read : 588

Woodstock; Or, The Cavalier - Chapter THE TWENTY-SEVENTH Woodstock; Or, The Cavalier - Chapter THE TWENTY-SEVENTH

Woodstock; Or, The Cavalier - Chapter THE TWENTY-SEVENTH
CHAPTER THE TWENTY-SEVENTH_Benedict_. Shall I speak a word in your ear? _Claudio_. God bless me from a challenge. MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING.As Charles was about to leave the apartment, he was prevented by the appearance of Wildrake, who entered with an unusual degree of swagger in his gait, and of fantastic importance on his brow. "I crave your pardon, fair sir," he said; "but, as they say in my country, when doors are open dogs enter. I have knocked and called in the hall to no purpose; so, knowing the way to this parlour, sir,--for I am a light partisan, and... Long Stories - Post by : MrChange - Date : April 2012 - Author : Sir Walter Scott - Read : 1286

Woodstock; Or, The Cavalier - Chapter THE TWENTY-SIXTH Woodstock; Or, The Cavalier - Chapter THE TWENTY-SIXTH

Woodstock; Or, The Cavalier - Chapter THE TWENTY-SIXTH
CHAPTER THE TWENTY-SIXTHBoundless intemperance In nature is a tyranny--it hath been The untimely emptying of many a throne, And fall of many kings. MACBETH.While Colonel Everard retreated in high indignation from the little refection, which Sir Henry Lee had in his good-humour offered, and withdrawn under the circumstances of provocation which we have detailed, the good old knight, scarce recovered from his fit of passion, partook of it with his daughter and guest, and shortly after, recollecting some silvan task, (for, though to little efficient purpose, he still regularly attended to his duties as Ranger,) he called Bevis, and went out,... Long Stories - Post by : Joshua_Ditty - Date : April 2012 - Author : Sir Walter Scott - Read : 1550

Woodstock; Or, The Cavalier - Chapter THE TWENTY-FIFTH Woodstock; Or, The Cavalier - Chapter THE TWENTY-FIFTH

Woodstock; Or, The Cavalier - Chapter THE TWENTY-FIFTH
CHAPTER THE TWENTY-FIFTHStay--for the King has thrown his warder down. RICHARD II.The combatants, whom we left engaged at the end of the last chapter, made mutual passes at each other with apparently equal skill and courage. Charles had been too often in action, and too long a party as well as a victim to civil war, to find any thing new or surprising in being obliged to defend himself with his own hands; and Everard had been distinguished, as well for his personal bravery, as for the other properties of a commander. But the arrival of a third party prevented the... Long Stories - Post by : ngling - Date : April 2012 - Author : Sir Walter Scott - Read : 946

Woodstock; Or, The Cavalier - Chapter THE TWENTY-FOURTH Woodstock; Or, The Cavalier - Chapter THE TWENTY-FOURTH

Woodstock; Or, The Cavalier - Chapter THE TWENTY-FOURTH
CHAPTER THE TWENTY-FOURTHThe deadliest snakes are those which, twined 'mongst flowers, Blend their bright colouring with the varied blossoms, Their fierce eyes glittering like the spangled dew-drop; In all so like what nature has most harmless, That sportive innocence, which dreads no danger, Is poison'd unawares. OLD PLAY.Charles (we must now give him his own name) was easily reconciled to the circumstances which rendered his residence at Woodstock advisable. No doubt he would much rather have secured his safety by making an immediate escape out of England; but he had been condemned already to many uncomfortable lurking-places, and more disagreeable disguises,... Long Stories - Post by : netprofitz - Date : April 2012 - Author : Sir Walter Scott - Read : 1563

Woodstock; Or, The Cavalier - Chapter THE TWENTY-THIRD Woodstock; Or, The Cavalier - Chapter THE TWENTY-THIRD

Woodstock; Or, The Cavalier - Chapter THE TWENTY-THIRD
CHAPTER THE TWENTY-THIRDFor there, they say, he daily doth frequent With unrestrained loose companions; While he, young, wanton, and effeminate boy, Takes on the point of honour, to support So dissolute a crew. RICHARD II.The conversation which Albert had in vain endeavoured to interrupt, flowed on in the same course after he had left the room. It entertained Louis Kerneguy; for personal vanity, or an over-sensitiveness to deserved reproof, were not among the faults of his character, and were indeed incompatible with an understanding, which, combined with more strength of principle, steadiness of exertion, and self-denial, might have placed Charles high... Long Stories - Post by : carrmedia - Date : April 2012 - Author : Sir Walter Scott - Read : 2186

Woodstock; Or, The Cavalier - Chapter THE TWENTY-SECOND Woodstock; Or, The Cavalier - Chapter THE TWENTY-SECOND

Woodstock; Or, The Cavalier - Chapter THE TWENTY-SECOND
CHAPTER THE TWENTY-SECONDGive Sir Nicholas Threlkeld praise; Hear it, good man, old in days, Thou tree of succour and of rest To this young bird that was distress'd; Beneath thy branches he did stay; And he was free to sport and play, When falcons were abroad for prey. WORDSWORTH.The fugitive Prince slept, in spite of danger, with the profound repose which youth and fatigue inspire. But the young cavalier, his guide and guard, spent a more restless night, starting from time to time, and listening; anxious, notwithstanding Dr. Rochecliffe's assurances, to procure yet more particular knowledge concerning the state of things... Long Stories - Post by : techguy04 - Date : April 2012 - Author : Sir Walter Scott - Read : 766

Woodstock; Or, The Cavalier - Chapter THE TWENTY-FIRST Woodstock; Or, The Cavalier - Chapter THE TWENTY-FIRST

Woodstock; Or, The Cavalier - Chapter THE TWENTY-FIRST
CHAPTER THE TWENTY-FIRST_Groom. Hail, noble prince! _King Richard. Thanks, noble peer; The cheapest of us is a groat too dear. RICHARD IIAlbert and his page were ushered by Joceline to what was called the Spanish Chamber, a huge old scrambling bedroom, rather in a dilapidated condition, but furnished with a large standing-bed for the master, and a truckle-bed for the domestic, as was common at a much later period in old English houses the gentleman often required the assistance of a groom of the chambers to help him to bed, if the hospitality had been exuberant. The walls were covered... Long Stories - Post by : kokopoko - Date : April 2012 - Author : Sir Walter Scott - Read : 2585

Woodstock; Or, The Cavalier - Chapter THE TWENTIETH Woodstock; Or, The Cavalier - Chapter THE TWENTIETH

Woodstock; Or, The Cavalier - Chapter THE TWENTIETH
CHAPTER THE TWENTIETHThe boy is--hark ye, sirrah--what's your name?-- Oh, Jacob--ay, I recollect--the same. CRABBE.The affectionate relatives were united as those who, meeting under great adversity, feel still the happiness of sharing it in common. They embraced again and again, and gave way to those expansions of the heart, which at once express and relieve the pressure of mental agitation. At length the tide of emotion began to subside; and Sir Henry, still holding his recovered son by the hand, resumed the command of his feelings which he usually practised."So you have seen the last of our battles, Albert," he said,... Long Stories - Post by : Arthur - Date : April 2012 - Author : Sir Walter Scott - Read : 2803

Woodstock; Or, The Cavalier - Chapter THE NINETEENTH Woodstock; Or, The Cavalier - Chapter THE NINETEENTH

Woodstock; Or, The Cavalier - Chapter THE NINETEENTH
CHAPTER THE NINETEENTHBeing skilless in these parts, which, to a stranger, Unguided and unfriended, often prove Rough and inhospitable. TWELFTH NIGHT.There was a little attempt at preparation, now that the dinner hour was arrived, which showed that, in the opinion of his few but faithful domestics, the good knight had returned in triumph to his home.The great tankard, exhibiting in bas-relief the figure of Michael subduing the Arch-enemy, was placed on the table, and Joceline and Phoebe dutifully attended; the one behind the chair of Sir Henry, the other to wait upon her young mistress, and both to make out, by... Long Stories - Post by : tunewrite - Date : April 2012 - Author : Sir Walter Scott - Read : 3233