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Full Online Book HomeAuthor Samuel Taylor ColeridgePage 1
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A Vision A Vision

A Vision
A feeling of sadness, a peculiar melancholy, is wont to take possession of me alike in spring and in autumn. But in spring it is the melancholy of hope: in autumn it is the melancholy of resignation. As I was journeying on foot through the Apennines, I fell in with a pilgrim in whom the spring and the autumn and the melancholy of both seemed to have combined. In his discourse there were the freshness and the colours of April: "Qual ramicel a ramo, Tal da pensier pensiero In lui germogliava."But... Essays - Post by : Donwhale - Date : October 2011 - Author : Samuel Taylor Coleridge - Read : 1403

Epitaph On An Infant (its Balmy Lips The Infant Blest) Epitaph On An Infant (its Balmy Lips The Infant Blest)

Epitaph On An Infant (its Balmy Lips The Infant Blest)
Its balmy lips the infant blest Relaxing from its mother's breast, How sweet it heaves the happy sigh Of innocent satiety! And such my infant's latest sigh! Oh tell, rude stone! the passer by, That here the pretty babe doth lie, Death sang to sleep with Lullaby.1799.(The end)Samuel Taylor Coleridge's poem: Epitaph On An Infant (Its Balmy Lips The Infant Blest)... Poems - Post by : imported_n/a - Date : September 2011 - Author : Samuel Taylor Coleridge - Read : 1628

On An Infant Which Died Before Baptism On An Infant Which Died Before Baptism

On An Infant Which Died Before Baptism
"Be, rather than be call'd, a child of God," Death whisper'd!--with assenting nod, Its head upon its mother's breast, The Baby bow'd, without demur-- Of the kingdom of the Blest Possessor, not inheritor.April 8th, 1799.(The end)Samuel Taylor Coleridge's poem: On An Infant Which Died Before Baptism... Poems - Post by : rondo - Date : September 2011 - Author : Samuel Taylor Coleridge - Read : 1359

On A Ruined House In A Romantic Country On A Ruined House In A Romantic Country

On A Ruined House In A Romantic Country
And this reft house is that the which he built, Lamented Jack! And here his malt he pil'd, Cautious in vain! These rats that squeak so wild, Squeak, not unconscious of their father's guilt. Did ye not see her gleaming thro' the glade? Belike, 'twas she, the maiden all forlorn. What though she milk no cow with crumpled horn, Yet _aye_ she haunts the dale where erst she stray'd; And _aye_ beside her stalks her amorous knight! Still on his thighs their wonted brogues are worn, And thro' those brogues, still... Poems - Post by : Anthony_Ellis - Date : September 2011 - Author : Samuel Taylor Coleridge - Read : 2104

A Sailor's Fortune - Essay V A Sailor's Fortune - Essay V

A Sailor's Fortune - Essay V
- Whose powers shed round him in the common strife,Or mild concerns of ordinary life,A constant influence, a peculiar grace;But who, if he be call'd upon to faceSame awful moment, to which Heaven has join'dGreat issues, good or bad for human kind,Is happy as a lover, is attiredWith sudden brightness like a man inspired;And through the heat of conflict keeps the lawIn calmness made, and sees what he foresaw.WORDSWORTH.An accessibility to the sentiments of others on subjects of importance often accompanies feeble minds, yet it is not the less a true and constituent part of practical greatness, when it exists wholly... Essays - Post by : normanh2 - Date : August 2011 - Author : Samuel Taylor Coleridge - Read : 3008

A Sailor's Fortune - Essay Iv A Sailor's Fortune - Essay Iv

A Sailor's Fortune - Essay Iv
- the generous spirit, who, when broughtAmong the tasks of real life, hath wroughtUpon the plan that pleased his childish thought:Whose high endeavours are an inward lightThat makes the path before him always bright;Who, doom'd to go in company with pain,And fear and bloodshed, miserable train!Turns his necessity to glorious gain;By objects, which might force the soul to abateHer feeling, rendered more compassionate.WORDSWORTH.At the close of the American war, Captain Ball was entrusted with the protection and convoying of an immense mercantile fleet to America, and by his great prudence and unexampled attention to the interests of all and each, endeared... Essays - Post by : caramelsho - Date : August 2011 - Author : Samuel Taylor Coleridge - Read : 1330

A Sailor's Fortune - Essay Iii A Sailor's Fortune - Essay Iii

A Sailor's Fortune - Essay Iii
Si partem tacuisse velim, quodeumque relinquam,Majus erit. Veteres actus, primamque juventamProsequar? Ad sese mentem praesentia ducunt.Narrem justitiam? Resplendet gloria Martis.Armati referam vires? Plus egit inermis.CLAUDIAN DE LAUD. STIL.(Translations.)--If I desire to pass over a part in silence, whatever I omit will seem the most worthy to have been recorded. Shall I pursue his old exploits and early youth? His recent merits recall the mind to themselves. Shall I dwelt on his justice? The glory of the warrior rises before me resplendent. Shall I relate his strength in arms? He performed... Essays - Post by : Howard_G - Date : August 2011 - Author : Samuel Taylor Coleridge - Read : 3477

A Sailor's Fortune - Essay Ii A Sailor's Fortune - Essay Ii

A Sailor's Fortune - Essay Ii
Quod me non movet aestimatione:Verum est (Greek text which cannot be reproduced) mei sodalis.CATULL. xii.(Translation.)--It interests not by any conceit of its value; but it is a remembrance of my honoured friend. The philosophic ruler, who secured the favours of fortune by seeking wisdom and knowledge in preference to them, has pathetically observed--"The heart knoweth its own bitterness; and there is a joy in which the stranger intermeddleth not." A simple question founded on a trite proverb, with a discursive answer to it, would scarcely suggest to an indifferent person any other notion than that of a mind at ease,... Essays - Post by : tankiatwee - Date : August 2011 - Author : Samuel Taylor Coleridge - Read : 2873

A Sailor's Fortune - Essay I A Sailor's Fortune - Essay I

A Sailor's Fortune - Essay I
Fortuna plerumque est velutiGalaxia quarundam obscurarumVirtutum sine nomine.BACON.(Translation)--Fortune is for the most part but a galaxy or milky way, as it were, of certain obscure virtues without a name. "Does Fortune favour fools? Or how do you explain the origin of the proverb, which, differently worded, is to be found in all the languages of Europe?" This proverb admits of various explanations, according to the mood of mind in which it is used. It may arise from pity, and the soothing persuasion that Providence is eminently watchful over the helpless, and extends an especial care to those who are... Essays - Post by : mickryan - Date : August 2011 - Author : Samuel Taylor Coleridge - Read : 2083

A Nightly Prayer A Nightly Prayer

A Nightly Prayer
Almighty God, by thy eternal Word my Creator Redeemer and Preserver! who hast in thy free communicative goodness glorified me with the capability of knowing thee, the one only absolute Good, the eternal I Am, as the author of my being, and of desiring and seeking thee as its ultimate end;--who, when I fell from thee into the mystery of the false and evil will, didst not abandon me, poor self-lost creature, but in thy condescending mercy didst provide an access and a return to thyself, even to thee the Holy One, in thine only begotten Son, the way and the... Essays - Post by : crazy - Date : August 2011 - Author : Samuel Taylor Coleridge - Read : 2904

Notes On The Book Of Common Prayer Notes On The Book Of Common Prayer

Notes On The Book Of Common Prayer
PRAYER. A man may pray night and day, and yet deceive himself; but no man can be assured of his sincerity who does not pray. Prayer is faith passing into act; a union of the will and the intellect realising in an intellectual act. It is the whole man that prays. Less than this is wishing, or lip-work; a charm or a mummery. PRAY ALWAYS, says the apostle: that is, have the habit of prayer, turning your thoughts into acts by connecting them with the idea of the redeeming God, and even so reconverting your actions... Essays - Post by : 19871987 - Date : August 2011 - Author : Samuel Taylor Coleridge - Read : 1513

Essay On Faith Essay On Faith

Essay On Faith
Faith may be defined as fidelity to our own being, so far as such being is not and cannot become an object of the senses; and hence, by clear inference or implication to being generally, as far as the same is not the object of the senses; and again to whatever is affirmed or understood as the condition, or concomitant, or consequence of the same. This will be best explained by an instance or example. That I am conscious of something within me peremptorily commanding me to do unto others as I would they should do unto me; in... Essays - Post by : queenbee19 - Date : August 2011 - Author : Samuel Taylor Coleridge - Read : 1549

Confessions Of An Inquiring Spirit Confessions Of An Inquiring Spirit

Confessions Of An Inquiring Spirit
LETTERS ON THE INSPIRATION OF THE SCRIPTURES. LETTER I. My dear friend, I employed the compelled and most unwelcome leisure of severe indisposition in reading The Confessions of a Fair Saint in Mr. Carlyle's recent translation of the Wilhelm Meister, which might, I think, have been better rendered literally The Confessions of a Beautiful Soul. This, acting in conjunction with the concluding sentences of your letter, threw my thoughts inward on my own religious experience, and gave immediate occasion to the following Confessions of one who is neither fair nor saintly, but who, groaning under a deep sense of infirmity... Essays - Post by : edbuckson - Date : August 2011 - Author : Samuel Taylor Coleridge - Read : 770

Adaption From Mark Akenside: Blank Verse Inscriptions Adaption From Mark Akenside: Blank Verse Inscriptions

Adaption From Mark Akenside: Blank Verse Inscriptions
(For Elegy Imitated from one of Akenside's 'Blank Verse Inscriptions', vide _ante_, p. 69.) Whoe'er thou art whose path in Summer lies Through yonder village, turn thee where the Grove Of branching oaks a rural palace old Embosoms--there dwells Albert, generous lord Of all the harvest round. And onward thence A low plain chapel fronts the morning light Fast by a silent rivulet. Humbly walk, O stranger, o'er the consecrated ground; And on that verdant Hillock, which thou seest Beset with osiers, let thy pious hand Sprinkle fresh... Poems - Post by : bobbiek - Date : August 2011 - Author : Samuel Taylor Coleridge - Read : 1829

Adaption From W. L. Bowles: 'i Yet Remain' Adaption From W. L. Bowles: 'i Yet Remain'

Adaption From W. L. Bowles: 'i Yet Remain'
----I yet remain To mourn the hours of youth (yet mourn in vain) That fled neglected: wisely thou hast trod The better path--and that high meed which God Assign'd to virtue, tow'ring from the dust, Shall wait thy rising, Spirit pure and just! O God! how sweet it were to think, that all Who silent mourn around this gloomy ball Might hear the voice of joy;--but 'tis the will Of man's great Author, that thro' good and ill Calm he should hold his course, and so sustain His... Poems - Post by : zonker - Date : August 2011 - Author : Samuel Taylor Coleridge - Read : 781

Adaption From An Old Play: Napoleon Adaption From An Old Play: Napoleon

Adaption From An Old Play: Napoleon
Then we may thank ourselves, Who spell-bound by the magic name of Peace Dream golden dreams. Go, warlike Britain, go, For the grey olive-branch change thy green laurels: Hang up thy rusty helmet, that the bee May have a hive, or spider find a loom! Instead of doubling drum and thrilling fife Be lull'd in lady's lap with amorous flutes: But for Napoleon, know, he'll scorn this calm: The ruddy planet at _his_ birth bore sway, Sanguine adust his humour, and wild fire His... Poems - Post by : John_Pawlett - Date : August 2011 - Author : Samuel Taylor Coleridge - Read : 744

The Hour-glass The Hour-glass

The Hour-glass
O think, fair maid! these sands that pass In slender threads adown this glass, Were once the body of some swain, Who lov'd too well and lov'd in vain, And let one soft sigh heave thy breast, That not in life alone unblest E'en lovers' ashes find no rest.(The end)Samuel Taylor Coleridge's poem: Hour-Glass... Poems - Post by : Annma - Date : August 2011 - Author : Samuel Taylor Coleridge - Read : 1570

Mutual Passion Mutual Passion

Mutual Passion
I love, and he loves me again, Yet dare I not tell who: For if the nymphs should know my swain, I fear they'd love him too. _Yet while my joy's unknown, Its rosy buds are but half-blown: What no one with me shares, seems scarce my own._ I'll tell, that if they be not glad, They yet may envy me: But then if I grow jealous mad, And of them pitied... Poems - Post by : waynz - Date : August 2011 - Author : Samuel Taylor Coleridge - Read : 1714

Letter To Sir Henry Goodyere Letter To Sir Henry Goodyere

Letter To Sir Henry Goodyere
Stanzas II, III, IV, and a few words from Stanza V, are prefixed as the motto to Essay XV of _The Friend_, 1818, i. 179; 1850, i. 136.For Stanza II, line 3-- But he which dwells there is not so; for he _With him_ who dwells there 'tis not so; for heFor Stanza III-- So had your body her morning, hath her noon, And shall not better, her next change is night: But her fair larger guest, t'whom sun and moon Are sparks, and short liv'd, claims another right.--The motto reads:... Poems - Post by : Tomas_Lod - Date : August 2011 - Author : Samuel Taylor Coleridge - Read : 2526

Donne (eclogue. 'on Unworthy Wisdom') Donne (eclogue. 'on Unworthy Wisdom')

Donne (eclogue. 'on Unworthy Wisdom')
So reclused Hermits oftentimes do know More of Heaven's glory than a worldly can: As Man is of the World, the Heart of Man Is an Epitome of God's great Book Of Creatures, and Men need no further look.These lines are quoted by Coleridge in _The Friend_, 1818, i. 192; 1850, i. 147. The first two lines run thus: _The_ recluse _Hermit oft'_ times _more doth_ know _Of the world's inmost wheels_, than worldlings can, &c.The alteration was first pointed out in an edition of _The Friend_ issued by H. N. Coleridge in 1837.(The end)Samuel... Poems - Post by : Britwit - Date : August 2011 - Author : Samuel Taylor Coleridge - Read : 1674