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The Fair Haven - The Fair Haven - Chapter 6. More Disingenuousness The Fair Haven - The Fair Haven - Chapter 6. More Disingenuousness

The Fair Haven - The Fair Haven - Chapter 6. More Disingenuousness
THE FAIR HAVEN CHAPTER VI. MORE DISINGENUOUSNESS(Here, perhaps, will be the fittest place for introducing a letter to my brother from a gentleman who is well known to the public, but who does not authorise me to give his name. I found this letter among my brother's papers, endorsed with the words "this must be attended to," but with nothing more. I imagine that my brother would have incorporated the substance of his correspondent's letter into this or the preceding chapter, but not venturing to do so myself, I have thought it best to give the letter and extract... Nonfictions - Post by : nogodiggydie - Date : May 2012 - Author : Samuel Butler - Read : 1141

The Fair Haven - The Fair Haven - Chapter 5. A Consideration Of Certain Ill-Judged Methods Of Defence The Fair Haven - The Fair Haven - Chapter 5. A Consideration Of Certain Ill-Judged Methods Of Defence

The Fair Haven - The Fair Haven - Chapter 5. A Consideration Of Certain Ill-Judged Methods Of Defence
THE FAIR HAVEN CHAPTER V. A CONSIDERATION OF CERTAIN ILL-JUDGED METHODS OF DEFENCEThe reader has now heard the utmost that can be said against the historic character of the Resurrection by the ablest of its impugners. I know of nothing in any of Strauss's works which can be considered as doing better justice to his opinions than the passages which I have quoted and, I trust, refuted. I have quoted fully, and have kept nothing in the background. If I had known of anything stronger against the Resurrection from any other source, I should certainly have produced it.... Nonfictions - Post by : nogodiggydie - Date : May 2012 - Author : Samuel Butler - Read : 735

The Fair Haven - The Fair Haven - Chapter 4. Paul's Testimony Considered The Fair Haven - The Fair Haven - Chapter 4. Paul's Testimony Considered

The Fair Haven - The Fair Haven - Chapter 4. Paul's Testimony Considered
THE FAIR HAVEN CHAPTER IV. PAUL'S TESTIMONY CONSIDEREDEnough has perhaps been said to cause the reader to agree with the view of St. Paul's conversion taken above--that is to say, to make him regard the conversion as mainly, if not entirely, due to the weight of evidence afforded by the courage and consistency of the early Christians. But, the change in Paul's mind being thus referred to causes which preclude all possibility of hallucination or ecstasy on his own part, it becomes unnecessary to discuss the attempts which have been made to explain away the miraculous character of the account given... Nonfictions - Post by : solar48 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Samuel Butler - Read : 1918

The Fair Haven - The Fair Haven - Chapter 3. The Character And Conversion Of St. Paul The Fair Haven - The Fair Haven - Chapter 3. The Character And Conversion Of St. Paul

The Fair Haven - The Fair Haven - Chapter 3. The Character And Conversion Of St. Paul
THE FAIR HAVEN CHAPTER III. THE CHARACTER AND CONVERSION OF ST. PAULSetting aside for the present the story of St. Paul's conversion as given in the Acts of the Apostles--for I am bound to admit that there are circumstances in connection with that account which throw doubt upon its historical accuracy--and looking at the broad facts only, we are struck at once with the following obvious reflection, namely, that Paul was an able man, a cultivated man, and a bitter opponent of Christianity; but that in spite of the strength of his original prejudices, he came to see what he thought... Nonfictions - Post by : Nikhilinxs - Date : May 2012 - Author : Samuel Butler - Read : 2096

The Fair Haven - The Fair Haven - Chapter 2. Strauss And The Hallucination Theory The Fair Haven - The Fair Haven - Chapter 2. Strauss And The Hallucination Theory

The Fair Haven - The Fair Haven - Chapter 2. Strauss And The Hallucination Theory
THE FAIR HAVEN CHAPTER II. STRAUSS AND THE HALLUCINATION THEORYIt has been well established by Paley, and indeed has seldom been denied, that within a very few years of Christ's crucifixion a large number of people believed that he had risen from the dead. They believed that after having suffered actual death he rose to actual life, as a man who could eat and drink and talk, who could be seen and handled. Some who held this were near relations of Christ, some had known him intimately for a considerable time before his crucifixion, many must have known him... Nonfictions - Post by : Nikhilinxs - Date : May 2012 - Author : Samuel Butler - Read : 2947

The Fair Haven - Memoir Of The Late John Pickard Owen - Chapter 2 The Fair Haven - Memoir Of The Late John Pickard Owen - Chapter 2

The Fair Haven - Memoir Of The Late John Pickard Owen - Chapter 2
MEMOIR OF THE LATE JOHN PICKARD OWEN CHAPTER IIBut it was impossible that a mind of such activity should have gone over so much ground, and yet in the end returned to the same position as that from which it started. So far was this from being the case that the Christianity of his maturer life would be considered dangerously heterodox by those who belong to any of the more definite or precise schools of theological thought. He was as one who has made the circuit of a mountain, and yet been ascending during the whole time of his doing... Nonfictions - Post by : Nikhilinxs - Date : May 2012 - Author : Samuel Butler - Read : 2692

The Fair Haven - Memoir Of The Late John Pickard Owen - Chapter 1 The Fair Haven - Memoir Of The Late John Pickard Owen - Chapter 1

The Fair Haven - Memoir Of The Late John Pickard Owen - Chapter 1
MEMOIR OF THE LATE JOHN PICKARD OWEN CHAPTER IThe subject of this Memoir, and Author of the work which follows it, was born in Goodge Street, Tottenham Court Road, London, on the 5th of February, 1832. He was my elder brother by about eighteen months. Our father and mother had once been rich, but through a succession of unavoidable misfortunes they were left with but a very moderate income when my brother and myself were about three and four years old. My father died some five or six years afterwards, and we only recollected him as a singularly gentle... Nonfictions - Post by : Nikhilinxs - Date : May 2012 - Author : Samuel Butler - Read : 1338

The Fair Haven - Preface The Fair Haven - Preface

The Fair Haven - Preface
Title: The Fair Haven Author: Samuel Butler THE FAIR HAVEN A Work in Defence of the Miraculous Element in our Lord's Ministry upon Earth, both as against Rationalistic Impugners and certain Orthodox Defenders, by the late John Pickard Owen, with a Memoir of the Author by William Bickersteth Owen. INTRODUCTION BY R. A. STREATFEILDThe demand for a new edition of The Fair Haven gives me an opportunity of saying a few words about the genesis of what, though not one of the most popular of Samuel Butler's books, is certainly one of the most characteristic. Few of his works, indeed, show... Nonfictions - Post by : Nikhilinxs - Date : May 2012 - Author : Samuel Butler - Read : 2494

Luck Or Cunning? - Chapter 19. Conclusion Luck Or Cunning? - Chapter 19. Conclusion

Luck Or Cunning? - Chapter 19. Conclusion
CHAPTER XIX. ConclusionAnd now I bring this book to a conclusion. So many things requiring attention have happened since it was begun that I leave it in a very different shape to the one which it was originally intended to bear. I have omitted much that I had meant to deal with, and have been tempted sometimes to introduce matter the connection of which with my subject is not immediately apparent. Such however, as the book is, it must now go in the form into which it has grown almost more in spite of me than from malice prepense... Nonfictions - Post by : Nikhilinxs - Date : May 2012 - Author : Samuel Butler - Read : 2505

Luck Or Cunning? - Chapter 18. Per Contra Luck Or Cunning? - Chapter 18. Per Contra

Luck Or Cunning? - Chapter 18. Per Contra
CHAPTER XVIII. Per Contra"'The evil that men do lives after them" {239a} is happily not so true as that the good lives after them, while the ill is buried with their bones, and to no one does this correction of Shakespeare's unwonted spleen apply more fully than to Mr. Darwin. Indeed it was somewhat thus that we treated his books even while he was alive; the good, descent, remained with us, while the ill, the deification of luck, was forgotten as soon as we put down his work. Let me now, therefore, as far as possible, quit the ungrateful... Nonfictions - Post by : Nikhilinxs - Date : May 2012 - Author : Samuel Butler - Read : 1028

Luck Or Cunning? - Chapter 17. Professor Ray Lankester And Lamarck Luck Or Cunning? - Chapter 17. Professor Ray Lankester And Lamarck

Luck Or Cunning? - Chapter 17. Professor Ray Lankester And Lamarck
CHAPTER XVII. Professor Ray Lankester and LamarckBeing anxious to give the reader a sample of the arguments against the theory of natural selection from among variations that are mainly either directly or indirectly functional in their inception, or more briefly against the Erasmus-Darwinian and Lamarckian systems, I can find nothing more to the point, or more recent, than Professor Ray Lankester's letter to the Athenaeum of March 29, 1884, to the latter part of which, however, I need alone call attention. Professor Ray Lankester says:- "And then we are introduced to the discredited speculations of Lamarck, which have found a worthy... Nonfictions - Post by : Nikhilinxs - Date : May 2012 - Author : Samuel Butler - Read : 1108

Luck Or Cunning? - Chapter 16. Mr. Grant Allen's 'Charles Darwin' Luck Or Cunning? - Chapter 16. Mr. Grant Allen's "Charles Darwin"

Luck Or Cunning? - Chapter 16. Mr. Grant Allen's 'Charles Darwin'
CHAPTER XVI. Mr. Grant Allen's "Charles Darwin"It is here that Mr. Grant Allen's book fails. It is impossible to believe it written in good faith, with no end in view, save to make something easy which might otherwise be found difficult; on the contrary, it leaves the impression of having been written with a desire to hinder us, as far as possible, from understanding things that Mr. Allen himself understood perfectly well. After saying that "in the public mind Mr. Darwin is perhaps most commonly regarded as the discoverer and founder of the evolution hypothesis," he continues that "the grand... Nonfictions - Post by : Nikhilinxs - Date : May 2012 - Author : Samuel Butler - Read : 3520

Luck Or Cunning? - Chapter 12. Why Darwin's Variations Were Accidental Luck Or Cunning? - Chapter 12. Why Darwin's Variations Were Accidental

Luck Or Cunning? - Chapter 12. Why Darwin's Variations Were Accidental
CHAPTER XII. Why Darwin's Variations were AccidentalSome may perhaps deny that Mr. Darwin did this, and say he laid so much stress on use and disuse as virtually to make function his main factor of evolution. If, indeed, we confine ourselves to isolated passages, we shall find little difficulty in making out a strong case to this effect. Certainly most people believe this to be Mr. Darwin's doctrine, and considering how long and fully he had the ear of the public, it is not likely they would think thus if Mr. Darwin had willed otherwise, nor could he have induced them... Nonfictions - Post by : Nikhilinxs - Date : May 2012 - Author : Samuel Butler - Read : 1596

Luck Or Cunning? - Chapter 11. The Way Of Escape Luck Or Cunning? - Chapter 11. The Way Of Escape

Luck Or Cunning? - Chapter 11. The Way Of Escape
CHAPTER XI. The Way of EscapeTo sum up the conclusions hitherto arrived at. Our philosophers have made the mistake of forgetting that they cannot carry the rough-and-ready language of common sense into precincts within which politeness and philosophy are supreme. Common sense sees life and death as distinct states having nothing in common, and hence in all respects the antitheses of one another; so that with common sense there should be no degrees of livingness, but if a thing is alive at all it is as much alive as the most living of us, and if dead at all... Nonfictions - Post by : Nikhilinxs - Date : May 2012 - Author : Samuel Butler - Read : 2683

Luck Or Cunning? - Chapter 10. The Attempt To Eliminate Mind Luck Or Cunning? - Chapter 10. The Attempt To Eliminate Mind

Luck Or Cunning? - Chapter 10. The Attempt To Eliminate Mind
CHAPTER X. The Attempt to Eliminate MindWhat, it may be asked, were our biologists really aiming at?--for men like Professor Huxley do not serve protoplasm for nought. They wanted a good many things, some of them more righteous than others, but all intelligible. Among the more lawful of their desires was a craving after a monistic conception of the universe. We all desire this; who can turn his thoughts to these matters at all and not instinctively lean towards the old conception of one supreme and ultimate essence as the source from which all things proceed and have... Nonfictions - Post by : Nikhilinxs - Date : May 2012 - Author : Samuel Butler - Read : 1312

Luck Or Cunning? - Chapter 9. Property, Common Sense, And Protoplasm (continued) Luck Or Cunning? - Chapter 9. Property, Common Sense, And Protoplasm (continued)

Luck Or Cunning? - Chapter 9. Property, Common Sense, And Protoplasm (continued)
CHAPTER IX. Property, Common Sense, and Protoplasm (continued)The position, then, stands thus. Common sense gave the inch of admitting some parts of the body to be less living than others, and philosophy took the ell of declaring the body to be almost all of it stone dead. This is serious; still if it were all, for a quiet life, we might put up with it. Unfortunately we know only too well that it will not be all. Our bodies, which seemed so living and now prove so dead, have served us such a trick that we can... Nonfictions - Post by : Nikhilinxs - Date : May 2012 - Author : Samuel Butler - Read : 811

Luck Or Cunning? - Chapter 8. Property, Common Sense, And Protoplasm Luck Or Cunning? - Chapter 8. Property, Common Sense, And Protoplasm

Luck Or Cunning? - Chapter 8. Property, Common Sense, And Protoplasm
CHAPTER VIII. Property, Common Sense, and ProtoplasmOne would think the issue stated in the three preceding chapters was decided in the stating. This, as I have already implied, is probably the reason why those who have a vested interest in Mr. Darwin's philosophical reputation have avoided stating it. It may be said that, seeing the result is a joint one, inasmuch as both "res" and "me," or both luck and cunning, enter so largely into development, neither factor can claim pre-eminence to the exclusion of the other. But life is short and business long, and if we are to... Nonfictions - Post by : Nikhilinxs - Date : May 2012 - Author : Samuel Butler - Read : 3546

Luck Or Cunning? - Chapter 7. (Intercalated) Mr. Spencer's 'The Factors Of Organic Evolution' Luck Or Cunning? - Chapter 7. (Intercalated) Mr. Spencer's "The Factors Of Organic Evolution"

Luck Or Cunning? - Chapter 7. (Intercalated) Mr. Spencer's 'The Factors Of Organic Evolution'
CHAPTER VII. (Intercalated) Mr. Spencer's "The Factors of Organic Evolution"Since the foregoing and several of the succeeding chapters were written, Mr. Herbert Spencer has made his position at once more clear and more widely understood by his articles "The Factors of Organic Evolution" which appeared in the Nineteenth Century for April and May, 1886. The present appears the fittest place in which to intercalate remarks concerning them. Mr. Spencer asks whether those are right who regard Mr. Charles Darwin's theory of natural selection as by itself sufficient to account for organic evolution. "On critically examining the evidence" (modern writers never... Nonfictions - Post by : Nikhilinxs - Date : May 2012 - Author : Samuel Butler - Read : 2396

Luck Or Cunning? - Chapter 6. Statement Of The Question At Issue (continued) Luck Or Cunning? - Chapter 6. Statement Of The Question At Issue (continued)

Luck Or Cunning? - Chapter 6. Statement Of The Question At Issue (continued)
CHAPTER VI. Statement of the Question at Issue (continued)So much for the older view; and now for the more modern opinion. According to Messrs. Darwin and Wallace, and ostensibly, I am afraid I should add, a great majority of our most prominent biologists, the view taken by Erasmus Darwin and Lamarck is not a sound one. Some organisms, indeed, are so admirably adapted to their surroundings, and some organs discharge their functions with so much appearance of provision, that we are apt to think they must owe their development to sense of need and consequent contrivance, but this opinion is... Nonfictions - Post by : Nikhilinxs - Date : May 2012 - Author : Samuel Butler - Read : 838

Luck Or Cunning? - Chapter 2. Mr. Herbert Spencer Luck Or Cunning? - Chapter 2. Mr. Herbert Spencer

Luck Or Cunning? - Chapter 2. Mr. Herbert Spencer
CHAPTER II. MR. HERBERT SPENCERMr. Herbert Spencer wrote to the Athenaeum (April 5, 1884), and quoted certain passages from the 1855 edition of his "Principles of Psychology," "the meanings and implications" from which he contended were sufficiently clear. The passages he quoted were as follows:- Though it is manifest that reflex and instinctive sequences are not determined by the experiences of the INDIVIDUAL organism manifesting them, yet there still remains the hypothesis that they are determined by the experiences of the RACE of organisms forming its ancestry, which by infinite repetition in countless successive generations have established these sequences as... Nonfictions - Post by : Nikhilinxs - Date : May 2012 - Author : Samuel Butler - Read : 1592