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Luck Or Cunning? - Chapter 1. Introduction Luck Or Cunning? - Chapter 1. Introduction

Luck Or Cunning? - Chapter 1. Introduction
CHAPTER I. INTRODUCTIONI shall perhaps best promote the acceptance of the two main points on which I have been insisting for some years past, I mean, the substantial identity between heredity and memory, and the reintroduction of design into organic development, by treating them as if they had something of that physical life with which they are so closely connected. Ideas are like plants and animals in this respect also, as in so many others, that they are more fully understood when their relations to other ideas of their time, and the history of their development are known and borne... Nonfictions - Post by : Nikhilinxs - Date : May 2012 - Author : Samuel Butler - Read : 2995

Luck Or Cunning? - Preface Luck Or Cunning? - Preface

Luck Or Cunning? - Preface
NoteThis second edition of Luck, or Cunning? is a reprint of the first edition, dated 1887, but actually published in November, 1886. The only alterations of any consequence are in the Index, which has been enlarged by the incorporation of several entries made by the author in a copy of the book which came into my possession on the death of his literary executor, Mr. R. A. Streatfeild. I thank Mr. G. W. Webb, of the University Library, Cambridge, for the care and skill with which he has made the necessary alterations; it was a troublesome job because owing... Nonfictions - Post by : Nikhilinxs - Date : May 2012 - Author : Samuel Butler - Read : 626

Canterbury Pieces - The English Cricketers Canterbury Pieces - The English Cricketers

Canterbury Pieces - The English Cricketers
The following lines were written by Butler in February, 1864, and appeared in the PRESS. They refer to a visit paid to New Zealand by a team of English cricketers, and have kindly been copied and sent to me by Miss Colborne-Veel, whose father was editor of the PRESS at the time that Butler was writing for it. Miss Colborne-Veel has further permitted to me to make use of the following explanatory note: "The coming of the All England team was naturally a glorious event in a province only fourteen years old. The Mayor and Councillors had... Nonfictions - Post by : Nikhilinxs - Date : May 2012 - Author : Samuel Butler - Read : 2106

Canterbury Pieces - A note on 'The Tempest' Canterbury Pieces - A note on "The Tempest"

Canterbury Pieces - A note on 'The Tempest'
Act III, Scene I The following brief essay was contributed by Butler to a small miscellany entitled LITERARY FOUNDLINGS: VERSE AND PROSE, COLLECTED IN CANTERBURY, N.Z., which was published at Christ Church on the occasion of a bazaar held there in March, 1864, in aid of the funds of the Christ Church Orphan Asylum, and offered for sale during the progress of the bazaar. The miscellany consisted entirely of the productions of Canterbury writers, and among the contributors were Dean Jacobs, Canon Cottrell, and James Edward FitzGerald, the founder of the PRESS. When Prince Ferdinand was wrecked on the... Nonfictions - Post by : Nikhilinxs - Date : May 2012 - Author : Samuel Butler - Read : 2557

Canterbury Pieces - Lucubratio Ebria Canterbury Pieces - Lucubratio Ebria

Canterbury Pieces - Lucubratio Ebria
"Lucubratio Ebria," like "Darwin Among the Machines," has already appeared in THE NOTE-BOOKS OF SAMUEL BUTLER with a prefatory note by Mr. Festing Jones, explaining its connection with EREWHON and LIFE AND HABIT. I need therefore only repeat that it was written by Butler after his return to England and sent to New Zealand it was published in the PRESS on July 29, 1865. There is a period in the evening, or more generally towards the still small hours of the morning, in which we so far unbend as to take a single glass of hot whisky and water.... Nonfictions - Post by : Nikhilinxs - Date : May 2012 - Author : Samuel Butler - Read : 1335

Canterbury Pieces - Darwin Among the Machines Canterbury Pieces - Darwin Among the Machines

Canterbury Pieces - Darwin Among the Machines
"Darwin Among the Machines" originally appeared in the Christ Church PRESS, 13 June, 1863. It was reprinted by Mr. Festing Jones in his edition of THE NOTE-BOOKS OF SAMUEL BUTLER (Fifield, London, 1912, Kennerley, New York), with a prefatory note pointing out its connection with the genesis of EREWHON, to which readers desirous of further information may be referred. (To the Editor of the Press, Christchurch, New Zealand, 13 June, 1863.) Sir--There are few things of which the present generation is more justly proud than of the wonderful improvements which are daily taking place in all sorts of mechanical appliances.... Nonfictions - Post by : Nikhilinxs - Date : May 2012 - Author : Samuel Butler - Read : 728

Canterbury Pieces - Darwin on the Origin of Species: Letter: 14 Mar 1863 Canterbury Pieces - Darwin on the Origin of Species: Letter: 14 Mar 1863

Canterbury Pieces - Darwin on the Origin of Species: Letter: 14 Mar 1863
DARWIN ON SPECIES: (From the Press, March 14th, 1863.) To the Editor of the Press. Sir--A correspondent signing himself "A. M." in the issue of February 21st says: --"Will the writer (of an article on barrel-organs) refer to anything bearing upon natural selection and the struggle for existence in Dr. Darwin's work?" This is one of the trade forms by which writers imply that there is no such passage, and yet leave a loophole if they are proved wrong. I will, however, furnish him with a passage from the notes of Darwin's Botanic Garden:- "I am acquainted with... Nonfictions - Post by : Nikhilinxs - Date : May 2012 - Author : Samuel Butler - Read : 1939

Canterbury Pieces - Darwin on the Origin of Species: Letter: 21 Feb 1863 Canterbury Pieces - Darwin on the Origin of Species: Letter: 21 Feb 1863

Canterbury Pieces - Darwin on the Origin of Species: Letter: 21 Feb 1863
DARWIN ON SPECIES: (From the Press, 21 February, 1863.) To the Editor of the Press. Sir--In two of your numbers you have already taken notice of Darwin's theory of the origin of species; I would venture to trespass upon your space in order to criticise briefly both your notices. The first is evidently the composition of a warm adherent of the theory in question; the writer overlooks all the real difficulties in the way of accepting it, and, caught by the obvious truth of much that Darwin says, has rushed to the conclusion that all is equally true. He... Nonfictions - Post by : Nikhilinxs - Date : May 2012 - Author : Samuel Butler - Read : 2347

Canterbury Pieces - Darwin on the Origin of Species: Barrel-Organs Canterbury Pieces - Darwin on the Origin of Species: Barrel-Organs

Canterbury Pieces - Darwin on the Origin of Species: Barrel-Organs
(From the Press, 17 January, 1863.) Dugald Stewart in his Dissertation on the Progress of Metaphysics says: "On reflecting on the repeated reproduction of ancient paradoxes by modern authors one is almost tempted to suppose that human invention is limited, like a barrel-organ, to a specific number of tunes." It would be a very amusing and instructive task for a man of reading and reflection to note down the instances he meets with of these old tunes coming up again and again in regular succession with hardly any change of note, and with all the old hitches and involuntary squeaks... Nonfictions - Post by : Nikhilinxs - Date : May 2012 - Author : Samuel Butler - Read : 2067

Canterbury Pieces - Darwin on the Origin of Species: A Dialogue Canterbury Pieces - Darwin on the Origin of Species: A Dialogue

Canterbury Pieces - Darwin on the Origin of Species: A Dialogue
(From the Press, 20 December, 1862.) F. So you have finished Darwin? Well, how did you like him? C. You cannot expect me to like him. He is so hard and logical, and he treats his subject with such an intensity of dry reasoning without giving himself the loose rein for a single moment from one end of the book to the other, that I must confess I have found it a great effort to read him through. F. But I fancy that, if you are to be candid, you will admit that the fault lies... Nonfictions - Post by : Nikhilinxs - Date : May 2012 - Author : Samuel Butler - Read : 2579

Canterbury Pieces - Darwin on the Origin of Species: Prefatory Note Canterbury Pieces - Darwin on the Origin of Species: Prefatory Note

Canterbury Pieces - Darwin on the Origin of Species: Prefatory Note
As the following dialogue embodies the earliest fruits of Butler's study of the works of Charles Darwin, with whose name his own was destined in later years to be so closely connected, and thus possesses an interest apart from its intrinsic merit, a few words as to the circumstances in which it was published will not be out of place. Butler arrived in New Zealand in October, 1859, and about the same time Charles Darwin's ORIGIN OF SPECIES was published. Shortly afterwards the book came into Butler's hands. He seems to have read it carefully, and meditated upon it.... Nonfictions - Post by : Nikhilinxs - Date : May 2012 - Author : Samuel Butler - Read : 1676

Evolution, Old & New - Chapter 21. Mr. Darwin's Defence Of The Expression... Evolution, Old & New - Chapter 21. Mr. Darwin's Defence Of The Expression...

Evolution, Old & New - Chapter 21. Mr. Darwin's Defence Of The Expression...
CHAPTER XXI. MR. DARWIN'S DEFENCE OF THE EXPRESSION, NATURAL SELECTION--PROFESSOR MIVART AND NATURAL SELECTIONSo important is it that we should come to a clear understanding upon the positions taken by Mr. Darwin and Lamarck respectively, that at the risk of wearying the reader I will endeavour to exhaust this subject here. In order to do so, I will follow Mr. Darwin's answer to those who have objected to the expression, "natural selection." Mr. Darwin says:-- "Several writers have misapprehended or objected to the term 'natural selection.' Some have even imagined that natural selection induces variability."(365) And small wonder if they have;... Nonfictions - Post by : ChrisDiRe - Date : May 2012 - Author : Samuel Butler - Read : 1232

Evolution, Old & New - Chapter 20. Natural Selection Considered As A Means Of... Evolution, Old & New - Chapter 20. Natural Selection Considered As A Means Of...

Evolution, Old & New - Chapter 20. Natural Selection Considered As A Means Of...
CHAPTER XX. NATURAL SELECTION CONSIDERED AS A MEANS OF MODIFICATION. THE CONFUSION WHICH THIS EXPRESSION OCCASIONSWhen Mr. Darwin says that natural selection is the most important "means" of modification, I am not sure that I understand what he wishes to imply by the word "means." I do not see how the fact that those animals which are best fitted for the conditions of their existence commonly survive in the struggle for life, can be called in any special sense a "means" of modification. "Means" is a dangerous word; it slips too easily into "cause." We have seen Mr. Darwin himself say... Nonfictions - Post by : ChrisDiRe - Date : May 2012 - Author : Samuel Butler - Read : 3457

Evolution, Old & New - Chapter 19. Main Points Of Agreement And Of Difference... Evolution, Old & New - Chapter 19. Main Points Of Agreement And Of Difference...

Evolution, Old & New - Chapter 19. Main Points Of Agreement And Of Difference...
CHAPTER XIX. MAIN POINTS OF AGREEMENT AND OF DIFFERENCE BETWEEN THE OLD AND NEW THEORIES OF EVOLUTIONHaving put before the reader with some fulness the theories of the three writers to whom we owe the older or teleological view of evolution, I will now compare that view more closely with the theory of Mr. Darwin and Mr. Wallace, to whom, in spite of my profound difference of opinion with them on the subject of natural selection, I admit with pleasure that I am under deep obligation. For the sake of brevity, I shall take Lamarck as the exponent of the older... Nonfictions - Post by : ChrisDiRe - Date : May 2012 - Author : Samuel Butler - Read : 1801

Evolution, Old & New - Chapter 18. Mr. Patrick Matthew, Mm. Etienne... Evolution, Old & New - Chapter 18. Mr. Patrick Matthew, Mm. Etienne...

Evolution, Old & New - Chapter 18. Mr. Patrick Matthew, Mm. Etienne...
CHAPTER XVIII. MR. PATRICK MATTHEW, MM. ETIENNE AND ISIDORE GEOFFROY ST. HILAIRE, AND MR. HERBERT SPENCERThe same complaint must be made against Mr. Matthew's excellent survey of the theory of evolution, as against Dr. Erasmus Darwin's original exposition of the same theory, namely, that it is too short. It may be very true that brevity is the soul of wit, but the leaders of science will generally succeed in burking new-born wit, unless the brevity of its soul is found compatible with a body of some bulk. Mr. Darwin writes thus concerning Mr. Matthew in the historical sketch to which I... Nonfictions - Post by : ChrisDiRe - Date : May 2012 - Author : Samuel Butler - Read : 2348

Evolution, Old & New - Chapter 17. Summary Of The 'Philosophie Zoologique' Evolution, Old & New - Chapter 17. Summary Of The 'Philosophie Zoologique'

Evolution, Old & New - Chapter 17. Summary Of The 'Philosophie Zoologique'
CHAPTER XVII. SUMMARY OF THE 'PHILOSOPHIE ZOOLOGIQUE'The first part of the '_Philosophie Zoologique_' is the one which deals with the doctrine of evolution or descent with modification. It is to this, therefore, that our attention will be confined. Yet only a comparatively small part of the three hundred and fifty pages which constitute Lamarck's first part are devoted to setting forth the reasons which led him to arrive at his conclusions--the greater part of the volume being occupied with the classification of animals, which we may again omit, as foreign to our purpose. I shall condense whenever I can, but I... Nonfictions - Post by : ChrisDiRe - Date : May 2012 - Author : Samuel Butler - Read : 3597

Evolution, Old & New - Chapter 16. General Misconception Concerning Lamarck... Evolution, Old & New - Chapter 16. General Misconception Concerning Lamarck...

Evolution, Old & New - Chapter 16. General Misconception Concerning Lamarck...
CHAPTER XVI. GENERAL MISCONCEPTION CONCERNING LAMARCK--HIS PHILOSOPHICAL POSITION"If Cuvier," says M. Isidore Geoffroy St. Hilaire,(186) "is the modern successor of Linnaeus, so is Lamarck of Buffon. But Cuvier does not go so far as Linnaeus, and Lamarck goes much farther than Buffon. Lamarck, moreover, took his own line, and his conjectures are not only much bolder, or rather more hazardous, but they are profoundly different from Buffon's. "It is well known that the vast labours of Lamarck were divided between botany and physical science in the eighteenth century, and between zoology and natural philosophy in the nineteenth; it is, however, less... Nonfictions - Post by : ChrisDiRe - Date : May 2012 - Author : Samuel Butler - Read : 2815

Evolution, Old & New - Chapter 15. Memoir Of Lamarck Evolution, Old & New - Chapter 15. Memoir Of Lamarck

Evolution, Old & New - Chapter 15. Memoir Of Lamarck
CHAPTER XV. MEMOIR OF LAMARCKI take the following memoir of Lamarck entirely from the biographical sketch prefixed by M. Martins to his excellent edition of the 'Philosophie Zoologique.'(184) From this sketch I find that "Lamarck was born August 1, 1744, at Barenton, in Picardy, being the eleventh child of Pierre de Monet, squire of the place, a man of old family, but poor. His father intended him for the Church, the ordinary resource of younger sons at that time, and accordingly placed him under the care of the Jesuits at Amiens. But this was not his vocation: the annals of his... Nonfictions - Post by : ChrisDiRe - Date : May 2012 - Author : Samuel Butler - Read : 1979

Evolution, Old & New - Chapter 11. Buffon--Fuller Quotations Evolution, Old & New - Chapter 11. Buffon--Fuller Quotations

Evolution, Old & New - Chapter 11. Buffon--Fuller Quotations
CHAPTER XI. BUFFON--FULLER QUOTATIONSLet us now proceed to those fuller quotations which may answer the double purpose of bearing me out in the view of Buffon's work which I have taken in the foregoing pages, and of inducing the reader to turn to Buffon himself. I have already said that from the very commencement of his work Buffon showed a proclivity towards considerations which were certain to lead him to a theory of evolution, even though he had not, as I believe he had, already taken a more comprehensive view of the subject than he thought fit to proclaim unreservedly. In... Nonfictions - Post by : Marie - Date : May 2012 - Author : Samuel Butler - Read : 935

Evolution, Old & New - Chapter 10. Supposed Fluctuations Of Opinion... Evolution, Old & New - Chapter 10. Supposed Fluctuations Of Opinion...

Evolution, Old & New - Chapter 10. Supposed Fluctuations Of Opinion...
CHAPTER X. SUPPOSED FLUCTUATIONS OF OPINION--CAUSES OR MEANS OF THE TRANSFORMATION OF SPECIESEnough, perhaps, has been already said to disabuse the reader's mind of the common misconception of Buffon, namely, that he was more or less of an elegant trifler with science, who cared rather about the language in which his ideas were clothed than about the ideas themselves, and that he did not hold the same opinions for long together; but the accusation of instability has been made in such high quarters that it is necessary to refute it still more completely. Mr. Darwin, for example, in his "Historical Sketch... Nonfictions - Post by : Marie - Date : May 2012 - Author : Samuel Butler - Read : 3007