Full Online Books
BOOK CATEGORIES
Authors Authors Short Stories Short Stories Long Stories Long Stories Funny Stories Funny Stories Love Stories Love Stories Stories For Kids Stories For Kids Poems Poems Essays Essays Nonfictions Nonfictions Plays Plays Folktales Folktales Fairy Tales Fairy Tales Fables Fables Learning Kitchen Learning Kitchen
LINKS
Valid XHTML 1.0 Transitional Free Classified Website Without Registration Free Classified Website Daniel Company
Twitter Twitter Add book
donate
Full Online Book HomeAuthor Rudyard KiplingPage 1
Famous Authors (View All Authors)

France At War - VI. THE COMMON TASK OF A GREAT PEOPLE France At War - VI. THE COMMON TASK OF A GREAT PEOPLE

France At War - VI. THE COMMON TASK OF A GREAT PEOPLE
"This is the end of the line," said the Staff Officer, kindest and most patient of chaperons. It buttressed itself on a fortress among hills. Beyond that, the silence was more awful than the mixed noise of business to the westward. In mileage on the map the line must be between four and five hundred miles; in actual trench-work many times that distance. It is too much to see at full length; the mind does not readily break away from the obsession of its entirety or the grip of its detail. One visualizes the thing afterwards as a white-hot gash, worming... Nonfictions - Post by : Uncle_Jim - Date : April 2012 - Author : Rudyard Kipling - Read : 1864

France At War - V. LIFE IN TRENCHES ON THE MOUNTAIN SIDE France At War - V. LIFE IN TRENCHES ON THE MOUNTAIN SIDE

France At War - V. LIFE IN TRENCHES ON THE MOUNTAIN SIDE
Very early in the morning I met Alan Breck, with a half-healed bullet-scrape across the bridge of his nose, and an Alpine cap over one ear. His people a few hundred years ago had been Scotch. He bore a Scotch name, and still recognized the head of his clan, but his French occasionally ran into German words, for he was an Alsatian on one side."This," he explained, "is the very best country in the world to fight in. It's picturesque and full of cover. I'm a gunner. I've been here for months. It's lovely."It might have been the hills under Mussoorie,... Nonfictions - Post by : KevinU - Date : April 2012 - Author : Rudyard Kipling - Read : 1952

France At War - IV. THE SPIRIT OF THE PEOPLE France At War - IV. THE SPIRIT OF THE PEOPLE

France At War - IV. THE SPIRIT OF THE PEOPLE
We passed into the zone of another army and a hillier country the border villages lay more sheltered. Here and there a town and the fields round it gave us a glimpse of the furious industry with which France makes and handles material and troops. With her, as with us, the wounded officer of experience goes back to the drill-ground to train the new levies. But it was always the little crowded, defiant villages, and the civil population waiting unweariedly and cheerfully on the unwearied, cheerful army, that went closest to the heart. Take these pictures, caught almost anywhere during... Nonfictions - Post by : tobjack - Date : April 2012 - Author : Rudyard Kipling - Read : 2211

France At War - III. BATTLE SPECTACLE AND A REVIEW France At War - III. BATTLE SPECTACLE AND A REVIEW

France At War - III. BATTLE SPECTACLE AND A REVIEW
Travelling with two chauffeurs is not the luxury it looks; since there is only one of you and there is always another of those iron men to relieve the wheel. Nor can I decide whether an ex-professor of the German tongue, or an ex-roadracer who has lived six years abroad, or a Marechal des Logis, or a Brigadier makes the most thrusting driver through three-mile stretches of military traffic repeated at half-hour intervals. Sometimes it was motor-ambulances strung all along a level; or supply; or those eternal big guns coming round corners with trees chained on their long backs to puzzle... Nonfictions - Post by : tony1219 - Date : April 2012 - Author : Rudyard Kipling - Read : 2702

France At War - II. THE NATION'S SPIRIT AND A NEW INHERITANCE France At War - II. THE NATION'S SPIRIT AND A NEW INHERITANCE

France At War - II. THE NATION'S SPIRIT AND A NEW INHERITANCE
We left that stricken but undefeated town, dodged a few miles down the roads beside which the women tended their cows, and dropped into a place on a hill where a Moroccan regiment of many experiences was in billets.They were Mohammedans bafflingly like half a dozen of our Indian frontier types, though they spoke no accessible tongue. They had, of course, turned the farm buildings where they lay into a little bit of Africa in colour and smell. They had been gassed in the north; shot over and shot down, and set up to be shelled again; and their officers talked... Nonfictions - Post by : Dougi - Date : April 2012 - Author : Rudyard Kipling - Read : 1490

France At War - I. ON THE FRONTIER OF CIVILIZATION France At War - I. ON THE FRONTIER OF CIVILIZATION

France At War - I. ON THE FRONTIER OF CIVILIZATION
"It's a pretty park," said the French artillery officer. "We've done a lot for it since the owner left. I hope he'll appreciate it when he comes back."The car traversed a winding drive through woods, between banks embellished with little chalets of a rustic nature. At first, the chalets stood their full height above ground, suggesting tea-gardens in England. Further on they sank into the earth till, at the top of the ascent, only their solid brown roofs showed. Torn branches drooping across the driveway, with here and there a scorched patch of undergrowth, explained the reason of their modesty.The chateau... Nonfictions - Post by : howard666 - Date : April 2012 - Author : Rudyard Kipling - Read : 2557

France At War - POEM: FRANCE France At War - POEM: FRANCE

France At War - POEM: FRANCE
_Broke to every known mischance, lifted over allBy the light sane joy of life, the buckler of the Gaul,Furious in luxury, merciless in toil,Terrible with strength that draws from her tireless soil,Strictest judge of her own worth, gentlest of men's mind,First to follow truth and last to leave old truths behind--France beloved of every soul that loves its fellow-kind._Ere our birth (rememberest thou?) side by side we layFretting in the womb of Rome to begin the fray.Ere men knew our tongues apart, our one taste was known--Each must mould the other's fate as he wrought his own.To this end we stirred... Nonfictions - Post by : rustler51 - Date : April 2012 - Author : Rudyard Kipling - Read : 2370

Sea Warefare - DESTROYERS AT JUTLAND Sea Warefare - DESTROYERS AT JUTLAND

Sea Warefare - DESTROYERS AT JUTLAND
(1916) "Have you news of my boy Jack?" _Not this tide._ "When d'you think that he'll come back?" _Not with this wind blowing, and this tide._ "Has any one else had word of him?" _Not this tide. For what is sunk will hardly swim, Not with this wind blowing and this tide._ "Oh, dear, what comfort can I find?" _None this tide, Nor any tide, Except he didn't shame his kind Not even with that wind blowing and that tide._ _Then hold your head up all the more, This tide, And every tide, Because he was the son you bore, And... Nonfictions - Post by : JB3232 - Date : April 2012 - Author : Rudyard Kipling - Read : 2745

Sea Warefare - TALES OF 'THE TRADE' Sea Warefare - TALES OF "THE TRADE"

Sea Warefare - TALES OF 'THE TRADE'
(1916)"THE TRADE" They bear, in place of classic names, Letters and numbers on their skin. They play their grisly blindfold games In little boxes made of tin. Sometimes they stalk the Zeppelin, Sometimes they learn where mines are laid Or where the Baltic ice is thin. That is the custom of "The Trade." Few prize-courts sit upon their claims. They seldom tow their targets in. They follow certain secret aims Down under, far from strife or din. When they are ready to begin No flag is flown, no fuss is made More than the shearing of a pin. That is the... Nonfictions - Post by : FatGuy - Date : April 2012 - Author : Rudyard Kipling - Read : 2217

Sea Warefare - THE FRINGES OF THE FLEET Sea Warefare - THE FRINGES OF THE FLEET

Sea Warefare - THE FRINGES OF THE FLEET
(1915) In Lowestoft a boat was laid, Mark well what I do say! And she was built for the herring trade, But she has gone a-rovin', a-rovin', a-rovin', The Lord knows where! They gave her Government coal to burn, And a Q.F. gun at bow and stern, And sent her out a-rovin', etc. Her skipper was mate of a bucko ship Which always killed one man per trip, So he is used to rovin', etc. Her mate was skipper of a chapel in Wales, And so he fights in topper and tails-- Religi-ous tho' rovin', etc. Her engineer is fifty-eight, So... Nonfictions - Post by : ggs03 - Date : April 2012 - Author : Rudyard Kipling - Read : 1962

Letters Of Travel (1892-1913) - EGYPT OF THE MAGICIANS (1913) - VII. THE RIDDLE OF EMPIRE Letters Of Travel (1892-1913) - EGYPT OF THE MAGICIANS (1913) - VII. THE RIDDLE OF EMPIRE

Letters Of Travel (1892-1913) - EGYPT OF THE MAGICIANS (1913) - VII. THE RIDDLE OF EMPIRE
At Halfa one feels the first breath of a frontier. Here the Egyptian Government retires into the background, and even the Cook steamer does not draw up in the exact centre of the postcard. At the telegraph-office, too, there are traces, diluted but quite recognisable, of military administration. Nor does the town, in any way or place whatever, smell--which is proof that it is not looked after on popular lines. There is nothing to see in it any more than there is in Hulk C. 60, late of her Majesty's troopship _Himalaya_, now a coal-hulk in the Hamoaze at Plymouth. A... Nonfictions - Post by : bucky - Date : April 2012 - Author : Rudyard Kipling - Read : 1066

Letters Of Travel (1892-1913) - EGYPT OF THE MAGICIANS (1913) - VI. THE FACE OF THE DESERT Letters Of Travel (1892-1913) - EGYPT OF THE MAGICIANS (1913) - VI. THE FACE OF THE DESERT

Letters Of Travel (1892-1913) - EGYPT OF THE MAGICIANS (1913) - VI. THE FACE OF THE DESERT
Going up the Nile is like running the gauntlet before Eternity. Till one has seen it, one does not realise the amazing thinness of that little damp trickle of life that steals along undefeated through the jaws of established death. A rifle-shot would cover the widest limits of cultivation, a bow-shot would reach the narrower. Once beyond them a man may carry his next drink with him till he reaches Cape Blanco on the west (where he may signal for one from a passing Union Castle boat) or the Karachi Club on the east. Say four thousand dry miles to the... Nonfictions - Post by : DamnSlimeIdiot - Date : April 2012 - Author : Rudyard Kipling - Read : 1722

Letters Of Travel (1892-1913) - EGYPT OF THE MAGICIANS (1913) - V. DEAD KINGS Letters Of Travel (1892-1913) - EGYPT OF THE MAGICIANS (1913) - V. DEAD KINGS

Letters Of Travel (1892-1913) - EGYPT OF THE MAGICIANS (1913) - V. DEAD KINGS
The Swiss are the only people who have taken the trouble to master the art of hotel-keeping. Consequently, in the things that really matter--beds, baths, and victuals--they control Egypt; and since every land always throws back to its aboriginal life (which is why the United States delight in telling aged stories), any ancient Egyptian would at once understand and join in with the life that roars through the nickel-plumbed tourist-barracks on the river all the world frolics in the sunshine. At first sight, the show lends itself to cheap moralising, till one recalls that one only sees busy folk when... Nonfictions - Post by : darrenous - Date : April 2012 - Author : Rudyard Kipling - Read : 3529

Letters Of Travel (1892-1913) - EGYPT OF THE MAGICIANS (1913) - IV. UP THE RIVER Letters Of Travel (1892-1913) - EGYPT OF THE MAGICIANS (1913) - IV. UP THE RIVER

Letters Of Travel (1892-1913) - EGYPT OF THE MAGICIANS (1913) - IV. UP THE RIVER
Once upon a time there was a murderer who got off with a life-sentence. What impressed him most, when he had time to think, was the frank boredom of all who took part in the ritual.'It was just like going to a doctor or a dentist,' he explained. '_You come to 'em very full of your affairs, and then you discover that it's only part of their daily work to _them_. I expect,' he added, 'I should have found it the same if--er--I'd gone on to the finish.'He would have. Break into any new Hell or Heaven and you will be... Nonfictions - Post by : wigbrs - Date : April 2012 - Author : Rudyard Kipling - Read : 2545

Letters Of Travel (1892-1913) - EGYPT OF THE MAGICIANS (1913) - III. A SERPENT OF OLD NILE Letters Of Travel (1892-1913) - EGYPT OF THE MAGICIANS (1913) - III. A SERPENT OF OLD NILE

Letters Of Travel (1892-1913) - EGYPT OF THE MAGICIANS (1913) - III. A SERPENT OF OLD NILE
Modern Cairo is an unkempt place. The streets are dirty and ill-constructed, the pavements unswept and often broken, the tramways thrown, rather than laid, down, the gutters neglected. One expects better than this in a city where the tourist spends so much every season. Granted that the tourist is a dog, he comes at least with a bone in his mouth, and a bone that many people pick. He should have a cleaner kennel. The official answer is that the tourist-traffic is a flea-bite compared with the cotton industry. Even so, land in Cairo city must be too valuable to be... Nonfictions - Post by : derrickt - Date : April 2012 - Author : Rudyard Kipling - Read : 1801

Letters Of Travel (1892-1913) - EGYPT OF THE MAGICIANS (1913) - II. A RETURN TO THE EAST Letters Of Travel (1892-1913) - EGYPT OF THE MAGICIANS (1913) - II. A RETURN TO THE EAST

Letters Of Travel (1892-1913) - EGYPT OF THE MAGICIANS (1913) - II. A RETURN TO THE EAST
The East is a much larger slice of the world than Europeans care to admit. Some say it begins at St. Gothard the smells of two continents meet and fight all through that terrible restaurant-car dinner in the tunnel. Others have found it at Venice on warm April mornings. But the East is wherever one sees the lateen sail--that shark's fin of a rig which for hundreds of years has dogged all white bathers round the Mediterranean. There is still a suggestion of menace, a hint of piracy, in the blood whenever the lateen goes by, fishing or fruiting or... Nonfictions - Post by : nosync - Date : April 2012 - Author : Rudyard Kipling - Read : 2084

Letters Of Travel (1892-1913) - EGYPT OF THE MAGICIANS (1913) - I. SEA TRAVEL Letters Of Travel (1892-1913) - EGYPT OF THE MAGICIANS (1913) - I. SEA TRAVEL

Letters Of Travel (1892-1913) - EGYPT OF THE MAGICIANS (1913) - I. SEA TRAVEL
I had left Europe for no reason except to discover the Sun, and there were rumours that he was to be found in Egypt.But I had not realised what more I should find there.A P. & O. boat carried us out of Marseilles. A serang of lascars, with whistle, chain, shawl, and fluttering blue clothes, was at work on the baggage-hatch. Somebody bungled at the winch. The serang called him a name unlovely in itself but awakening delightful memories in the hearer.'O Serang, is that man a fool?''Very foolish, sahib. He comes from Surat. He only comes for his food's sake.'The... Nonfictions - Post by : fyfe-ja - Date : April 2012 - Author : Rudyard Kipling - Read : 2001

Letters Of Travel (1892-1913) - LETTERS TO THE FAMILY (1907) - A CONCLUSION Letters Of Travel (1892-1913) - LETTERS TO THE FAMILY (1907) - A CONCLUSION

Letters Of Travel (1892-1913) - LETTERS TO THE FAMILY (1907) - A CONCLUSION
Canada possesses two pillars of Strength and Beauty in Quebec and Victoria. The former ranks by herself among those Mother-cities of whom none can say 'This reminds me.' To realise Victoria you must take all that the eye admires most in Bournemouth, Torquay, the Isle of Wight, the Happy Valley at Hong-Kong, the Doon, Sorrento, and Camps Bay; add reminiscences of the Thousand Islands, and arrange the whole round the Bay of Naples, with some Himalayas for the background.Real estate agents recommend it as a little piece of England--the island on which it stands is about the size of Great Britain--but... Nonfictions - Post by : kdemoise - Date : April 2012 - Author : Rudyard Kipling - Read : 3063

Letters Of Travel (1892-1913) - LETTERS TO THE FAMILY (1907) - MOUNTAINS AND THE PACIFIC Letters Of Travel (1892-1913) - LETTERS TO THE FAMILY (1907) - MOUNTAINS AND THE PACIFIC

Letters Of Travel (1892-1913) - LETTERS TO THE FAMILY (1907) - MOUNTAINS AND THE PACIFIC
The Prairie proper ends at Calgary, among the cattle-ranches, mills, breweries, and three million acre irrigation works. The river that floats timber to the town from the mountains does not slide nor rustle like Prairie rivers, but brawls across bars of blue pebbles, and a greenish tinge in its water hints of the snows.What I saw of Calgary was crowded into one lively half-hour (motors were invented to run about new cities). What I heard I picked up, oddly enough, weeks later, from a young Dane in the North Sea. He was qualmish, but his Saga of triumph upheld him.'Three years... Nonfictions - Post by : tinabarr - Date : April 2012 - Author : Rudyard Kipling - Read : 2451

Letters Of Travel (1892-1913) - LETTERS TO THE FAMILY (1907) - THE FORTUNATE TOWNS Letters Of Travel (1892-1913) - LETTERS TO THE FAMILY (1907) - THE FORTUNATE TOWNS

Letters Of Travel (1892-1913) - LETTERS TO THE FAMILY (1907) - THE FORTUNATE TOWNS
After Politics, let us return to the Prairie which is the High Veldt, plus Hope, Activity, and Reward. Winnipeg is the door to it--a great city in a great plain, comparing herself, innocently enough, to other cities of her acquaintance, but quite unlike any other city.When one meets, in her own house, a woman not seen since girlhood she is all a stranger till some remembered tone or gesture links up to the past, and one cries: 'It _is you after all.' But, indeed, the child has gone; the woman with her influences has taken her place. I tried vainly to... Nonfictions - Post by : boo-key.com - Date : April 2012 - Author : Rudyard Kipling - Read : 3379