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The Ruined Cottage (eclogue) The Ruined Cottage (eclogue)

The Ruined Cottage (eclogue)
Aye Charles! I knew that this would fix thine eye, This woodbine wreathing round the broken porch, Its leaves just withering, yet one autumn flower Still fresh and fragrant; and yon holly-hock That thro' the creeping weeds and nettles tall Peers taller, and uplifts its column'd stem Bright with the broad rose-blossoms. I have seen Many a fallen convent reverend in decay, And many a time have trod the castle courts And grass-green halls, yet never did they strike Home to the heart such melancholy thoughts As this poor cottage.... Poems - Post by : aaabyss - Date : March 2011 - Author : Robert Southey - Read : 1678

The Witch (eclogue) The Witch (eclogue)

The Witch (eclogue)
NATHANIEL. Father! here father! I have found a horse-shoe! Faith it was just in time, for t'other night I laid two straws across at Margery's door, And afterwards I fear'd that she might do me A mischief for't. There was the Miller's boy Who set his dog... Poems - Post by : chrisfuchs - Date : March 2011 - Author : Robert Southey - Read : 554

The Sailor's Mother (eclogue) The Sailor's Mother (eclogue)

The Sailor's Mother (eclogue)
WOMAN. Sir for the love of God some small relief To a poor woman!TRAVELLER. Whither are you bound? 'Tis a late hour to travel o'er these downs, No house for miles around us, and the way Dreary and wild. The evening wind already... Poems - Post by : rameses - Date : March 2011 - Author : Robert Southey - Read : 2351

The Funeral (eclogue) The Funeral (eclogue)

The Funeral (eclogue)
The coffin (1) as I past across the lane Came sudden on my view. It was not here, A sight of every day, as in the streets Of the great city, and we paus'd and ask'd Who to the grave was going. It was one, A village girl, they told us, who had borne An eighteen months strange illness, and had pined With such slow wasting that the hour of death Came welcome to her. We pursued our way To the house of mirth, and with that idle talk That passes... Poems - Post by : willytan - Date : March 2011 - Author : Robert Southey - Read : 2367

The Grandmothers Tale (eclogue) The Grandmothers Tale (eclogue)

The Grandmothers Tale (eclogue)
JANE. Harry! I'm tired of playing. We'll draw round The fire, and Grandmamma perhaps will tell us One of her stories.HARRY. Aye--dear Grandmamma! A pretty story! something dismal now; A bloody murder.JANE. Or about a ghost.GRANDMOTHER. Nay, nay, I should but frighten you. You know The other night... Poems - Post by : Harald - Date : March 2011 - Author : Robert Southey - Read : 1375

The Old Mansion-house (eclogue) The Old Mansion-house (eclogue)

The Old Mansion-house (eclogue)
STRANGER. Old friend! why you seem bent on parish duty, Breaking the highway stones,--and 'tis a task Somewhat too hard methinks for age like yours.OLD MAN. Why yes! for one with such a weight of years Upon his back. I've lived here, man and boy, In this... Poems - Post by : jojac - Date : March 2011 - Author : Robert Southey - Read : 2908

Henry The Hermit Henry The Hermit

Henry The Hermit
It was a little island where he dwelt, Or rather a lone rock, barren and bleak, Short scanty herbage spotting with dark spots Its gray stone surface. Never mariner Approach'd that rude and uninviting coast, Nor ever fisherman his lonely bark Anchored beside its shore. It was a place Befitting well a rigid anchoret, Dead to the hopes, and vanities, and joys And purposes of life; and he had dwelt Many long years upon that lonely isle, For in ripe manhood he abandoned arms, Honours and friends and country... Poems - Post by : jvernon - Date : March 2011 - Author : Robert Southey - Read : 2586

The Surgeon's Warning The Surgeon's Warning

The Surgeon's Warning
The subject of this parody was given me by a friend, to whom also I am indebted for some of the stanzas. Respecting the patent coffins herein mentioned, after the manner of Catholic Poets, who confess the actions they attribute to their Saints and Deity to be but fiction, I hereby declare that it is by no means my design to depreciate that useful invention; and all persons to whom this Ballad shall come are requested to take notice, that nothing here asserted concerning the aforesaid Coffins is true, except that the maker and patentee lives by St. Martin's Lane. THE... Poems - Post by : sweetsuccess - Date : March 2011 - Author : Robert Southey - Read : 1110

A Ballad, Shewing How An Old Woman Rode Double, And Who Rode Before Her A Ballad, Shewing How An Old Woman Rode Double, And Who Rode Before Her

A Ballad, Shewing How An Old Woman Rode Double, And Who Rode Before Her
This story is also related by Olaus Magnus, and in the Nuremberg Chronicle, from which the wooden cut is taken. A BALLAD,SHEWING HOW AN OLD WOMAN RODE DOUBLE, AND WHO RODE BEFORE HER. The Raven croak'd as she sate at her meal, And the Old Woman knew what he said, And she grew pale at the Raven's tale, And sicken'd and went to her bed. Now fetch me my children, and fetch them with speed, The Old Woman of Berkeley said, The monk my son, and my... Poems - Post by : saumil_p - Date : March 2011 - Author : Robert Southey - Read : 790

Lord William Lord William

Lord William
No eye beheld when William plunged Young Edmund in the stream, No human ear but William's heard Young Edmund's drowning scream. Submissive all the vassals own'd The murderer for their Lord, And he, the rightful heir, possessed The house of Erlingford. The ancient house of Erlingford Stood midst a fair domain, And Severn's ample waters near Roll'd through the fertile plain. And often the way-faring man Would love to linger there, Forgetful of... Poems - Post by : wrayherring - Date : March 2011 - Author : Robert Southey - Read : 1200

Jaspar Jaspar

Jaspar
The stories of the two following ballads are wholly imaginary. I may say of each as John Bunyan did of his 'Pilgrim's Progress', "It came from mine own heart, so to my head, And thence into my fingers trickled; Then to my pen, from whence immediately On paper I did dribble it daintily." JASPAR Jaspar was poor, and want and vice Had made his heart like stone, And Jaspar look'd with envious eyes On riches not his own. On plunder bent abroad he went Towards the... Poems - Post by : thehypnotist - Date : March 2011 - Author : Robert Southey - Read : 3363

The Sailor, Who Had Served In The Slave Trade The Sailor, Who Had Served In The Slave Trade

The Sailor, Who Had Served In The Slave Trade
In September, 1798, a Dissenting Minister of Bristol, discovered a Sailor in the neighbourhood of that City, groaning and praying in a hovel. The circumstance that occasioned his agony of mind is detailed in the annexed Ballad, without the slightest addition or alteration. By presenting it as a Poem the story is made more public, and such stories ought to be made as public as possible.THE SAILOR,WHO HAD SERVED IN THE SLAVE-TRADE. He stopt,--it surely was a groan That from the hovel came! He stopt and listened anxiously Again it sounds the same.... Poems - Post by : Paddy - Date : March 2011 - Author : Robert Southey - Read : 1869

The Cross Roads The Cross Roads

The Cross Roads
The circumstance related in the following Ballad happened about forty years ago in a village adjacent to Bristol. A person who was present at the funeral, told me the story and the particulars of the interment, as I have versified them. THE CROSS ROADS. There was an old man breaking stones To mend the turnpike way, He sat him down beside a brook And out his bread and cheese he took, For now it was mid-day. He lent his back against a post, His feet the brook ran by;... Poems - Post by : add2it - Date : March 2011 - Author : Robert Southey - Read : 1280

Metrical Letter Metrical Letter

Metrical Letter
Written from London.  Margaret! my Cousin!--nay, you must not smile; I love the homely and familiar phrase; And I will call thee Cousin Margaret, However quaint amid the measured line The good old term appears. Oh! it looks ill When delicate tongues disclaim old terms of kin, Sirring and Madaming as civilly As if the road between the heart and lips Were such a weary and Laplandish way That the poor travellers came to the red gates Half frozen. Trust me Cousin Margaret, For many a day my Memory... Poems - Post by : dopom9 - Date : March 2011 - Author : Robert Southey - Read : 1060

The Complaints Of The Poor The Complaints Of The Poor

The Complaints Of The Poor
And wherefore do the Poor complain? The rich man asked of me,-- Come walk abroad with me, I said And I will answer thee. Twas evening and the frozen streets Were cheerless to behold, And we were wrapt and coated well, And yet we were a-cold. We met an old bare-headed man, His locks were few and white, I ask'd him what he did abroad In that cold winter's night: 'Twas bitter keen indeed, he said,... Poems - Post by : Jeff_M - Date : March 2011 - Author : Robert Southey - Read : 810

The Vision Of The Maid Of Orleans: The Third Book The Vision Of The Maid Of Orleans: The Third Book

The Vision Of The Maid Of Orleans: The Third Book
The Maiden, musing on the Warrior's words, Turn'd from the Hall of Glory. Now they reach'd A cavern, at whose mouth a Genius stood, In front a beardless youth, whose smiling eye Beam'd promise, but behind, withered and old, And all unlovely. Underneath his feet Lay records trampled, and the laurel wreath Now rent and faded: in his hand he held An hour-glass, and as fall the restless sands, So pass the lives of men. By him they past Along the darksome cave, and reach'd a stream, Still rolling onward... Poems - Post by : cyberbob - Date : March 2011 - Author : Robert Southey - Read : 757

The Vision Of The Maid Of Orleans: The Second Book The Vision Of The Maid Of Orleans: The Second Book

The Vision Of The Maid Of Orleans: The Second Book
She spake, and lo! celestial radiance beam'dAmid the air, such odors wafting nowAs erst came blended with the evening gale,From Eden's bowers of bliss. An angel formStood by the Maid; his wings, etherial white,Flash'd like the diamond in the noon-tide sun,Dazzling her mortal eye: all else appear'dHer THEODORE. Amazed she saw: the FiendWas fled, and on her ear the well-known voiceSounded, tho' now more musically sweetThan ever yet had thrill'd her charmed soul,When eloquent Affection fondly toldThe day-dreams of delight.... Poems - Post by : jthomas - Date : March 2011 - Author : Robert Southey - Read : 3148

The Vision Of The Maid Of Orleans: The First Book The Vision Of The Maid Of Orleans: The First Book

The Vision Of The Maid Of Orleans: The First Book
Orleans was hush'd in sleep. Stretch'd on her couch The delegated Maiden lay: with toil Exhausted and sore anguish, soon she closed Her heavy eye-lids; not reposing then, For busy Phantasy, in other scenes Awakened. Whether that superior powers, By wise permission, prompt the midnight dream, Instructing so the passive (1) faculty; Or that the soul, escaped its fleshly clog, Flies free, and soars amid the invisible world, And all things 'are' that (2) 'seem'.... Poems - Post by : rsagers - Date : March 2011 - Author : Robert Southey - Read : 1041

Hymn To The Penates Hymn To The Penates

Hymn To The Penates
Remove far from me vanity and lies; give me neither poverty nor riches; feed me with food convenient for me.The words of Agur. The Title of the following Poem will probably remind the Reader of Akenside's Hymn to the Naiads, but the manner in which I have treated the subject fortunately precludes comparison.HYMN to the PENATES.Yet one Song more! one high and solemn strainEre PAEAN! on thy temple's ruined wallI hang the silent harp: there may its strings,When the rude tempest shakes the aged pile,Make melancholy music. One Song more!PENATES! hear me! for to you I hymnThe votive lay. Whether, as sages... Poems - Post by : Jeff_Carter - Date : March 2011 - Author : Robert Southey - Read : 2026

Rudiger Rudiger

Rudiger
Divers Princes and Noblemen being assembled in a beautiful and fair Palace, which was situate upon the river Rhine, they beheld a boat or small barge make toward the shore, drawn by a Swan in a silver chain, the one end fastened about her neck, the other to the vessel; and in it an unknown soldier, a man of a comely personage and graceful presence, who stept upon the shore; which done, the boat guided by the Swan left him, and floated down the river. This man fell afterward in league with a fair gentlewoman, married her, and by her had... Poems - Post by : janislynn - Date : March 2011 - Author : Robert Southey - Read : 2873