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The Misadventures Of John Nicholson: A Christmas Story - Chapter VI. THE HOUSE AT MURRAYFIELD The Misadventures Of John Nicholson: A Christmas Story - Chapter VI. THE HOUSE AT MURRAYFIELD

The Misadventures Of John Nicholson: A Christmas Story - Chapter VI. THE HOUSE AT MURRAYFIELD
How John passed the evening, in what windy confusion of mind, in what squalls of anger and lulls of sick collapse, in what pacing of streets and plunging into public-houses, it would profit little to relate. His misery, if it were not progressive, yet tended in no way to diminish; for in proportion as grief and indignation abated, fear began to take their place. At first, his father's menacing words lay by in some safe drawer of memory, biding their hour. At first, John was all thwarted affection and blighted hope; next bludgeoned vanity raised its head again, with twenty mortal... Long Stories - Post by : gangsta - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 3536

The Misadventures Of John Nicholson: A Christmas Story - Chapter V. THE PRODIGAL'S RETURN The Misadventures Of John Nicholson: A Christmas Story - Chapter V. THE PRODIGAL'S RETURN

The Misadventures Of John Nicholson: A Christmas Story - Chapter V. THE PRODIGAL'S RETURN
BY a little after noon on the eve of Christmas, John had left his portmanteau in the cloak-room, and stepped forth into Princes Street with a wonderful expansion of the soul, such as men enjoy on the completion of long-nourished schemes. He was at home again, incognito and rich; presently he could enter his father's house by means of the pass-key, which he had piously preserved through all his wanderings; he would throw down the borrowed money; there would be a reconciliation, the details of which he frequently arranged; and he saw himself, during the next month, made welcome in many... Long Stories - Post by : webtracker - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 2254

The Misadventures Of John Nicholson: A Christmas Story - Chapter IV. THE SECOND SOWING The Misadventures Of John Nicholson: A Christmas Story - Chapter IV. THE SECOND SOWING

The Misadventures Of John Nicholson: A Christmas Story - Chapter IV. THE SECOND SOWING
IT is no part of mine to narrate the adventures of John Nicholson, which were many, but simply his more momentous misadventures, which were more than he desired, and, by human standards, more than he deserved; how he reached California, how he was rooked, and robbed, and beaten, and starved; how he was at last taken up by charitable folk, restored to some degree of self-complacency, and installed as a clerk in a bank in San Francisco, it would take too long to tell; nor in these episodes were there any marks of the peculiar Nicholsonic destiny, for they were just... Long Stories - Post by : Di_Weslio - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 1835

The Misadventures Of John Nicholson: A Christmas Story - Chapter III. IN WHICH JOHN ENJOYS THE HARVEST HOME The Misadventures Of John Nicholson: A Christmas Story - Chapter III. IN WHICH JOHN ENJOYS THE HARVEST HOME

The Misadventures Of John Nicholson: A Christmas Story - Chapter III. IN WHICH JOHN ENJOYS THE HARVEST HOME
SHORTLY after breakfast, at which he assisted with a highly tragical countenance, John sought his father where he sat, presumably in religious meditation, on the Sabbath mornings. The old gentleman looked up with that sour, inquisitive expression that came so near to smiling and was so different in effect.'This is a time when I do not like to be disturbed,' he said.'I know that,' returned John; 'but I have - I want - I've made a dreadful mess of it,' he broke out, and turned to the window.Mr. Nicholson sat silent for an appreciable time, while his unhappy son surveyed the... Long Stories - Post by : billbelfert - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 1502

The Misadventures Of John Nicholson: A Christmas Story - Chapter II. IN WHICH JOHN REAPS THE WHIRLWIND The Misadventures Of John Nicholson: A Christmas Story - Chapter II. IN WHICH JOHN REAPS THE WHIRLWIND

The Misadventures Of John Nicholson: A Christmas Story - Chapter II. IN WHICH JOHN REAPS THE WHIRLWIND
ABOUT half-past ten it was John's brave good fortune to offer his arm to Miss Mackenzie, and escort her home. The night was chill and starry; all the way eastward the trees of the different gardens rustled and looked black. Up the stone gully of Leith Walk, when they came to cross it, the breeze made a rush and set the flames of the street-lamps quavering; and when at last they had mounted to the Royal Terrace Captain Mackenzie lived, a great salt freshness came in their faces from the sea. These phases of the walk remained written on John's... Long Stories - Post by : johnegj - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 2145

The Misadventures Of John Nicholson: A Christmas Story - Chapter I. IN WHICH JOHN SOWS THE WIND The Misadventures Of John Nicholson: A Christmas Story - Chapter I. IN WHICH JOHN SOWS THE WIND

The Misadventures Of John Nicholson: A Christmas Story - Chapter I. IN WHICH JOHN SOWS THE WIND
JOHN VAREY NICHOLSON was stupid; yet, stupider men than he are now sprawling in Parliament, and lauding themselves as the authors of their own distinction. He was of a fat habit, even from boyhood, and inclined to a cheerful and cursory reading of the face of life; and possibly this attitude of mind was the original cause of his misfortunes. Beyond this hint philosophy is silent on his career, and superstition steps in with the more ready explanation that he was detested of the gods.His father - that iron gentleman - had long ago enthroned himself on the heights of the... Long Stories - Post by : gballard - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 1229

Familiar Studies Of Men & Books - Chapter IX. JOHN KNOX AND HIS RELATIONS TO WOMEN Familiar Studies Of Men & Books - Chapter IX. JOHN KNOX AND HIS RELATIONS TO WOMEN

Familiar Studies Of Men & Books - Chapter IX. JOHN KNOX AND HIS RELATIONS TO WOMEN
I. - THE CONTROVERSY ABOUT FEMALE RULE.WHEN first the idea became widely spread among men that the Word of God, instead of being truly the foundation of all existing institutions, was rather a stone which the builders had rejected, it was but natural that the consequent havoc among received opinions should be accompanied by the generation of many new and lively hopes for the future. Somewhat as in the early days of the French Revolution, men must have looked for an immediate and universal improvement in their condition. Christianity, up to that time, had been somewhat of a failure politically. The... Nonfictions - Post by : duskosavic - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 2122

Familiar Studies Of Men & Books - Chapter VIII. SAMUEL PEPYS Familiar Studies Of Men & Books - Chapter VIII. SAMUEL PEPYS

Familiar Studies Of Men & Books - Chapter VIII. SAMUEL PEPYS
IN two books a fresh light has recently been thrown on the character and position of Samuel Pepys. Mr. Mynors Bright has given us a new transcription of the Diary, increasing it in bulk by near a third, correcting many errors, and completing our knowledge of the man in some curious and important points. We can only regret that he has taken liberties with the author and the public. It is no part of the duties of the editor of an established classic to decide what may or may not be "tedious to the reader." The book is either an historical... Nonfictions - Post by : dantzer - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 1280

Familiar Studies Of Men & Books - Chapter VII. CHARLES OF ORLEANS Familiar Studies Of Men & Books - Chapter VII. CHARLES OF ORLEANS

Familiar Studies Of Men & Books - Chapter VII. CHARLES OF ORLEANS
FOR one who was no great politician, nor (as men go) especially wise, capable or virtuous, Charles of Orleans is more than usually enviable to all who love that better sort of fame which consists in being known not widely, but intimately. "To be content that time to come should know there was such a man, not caring whether they knew more of him, or to subsist under naked denominations, without deserts or noble acts," is, says Sir Thomas Browne, a frigid ambition. It is to some more specific memory that youth looks forward in its vigils. Old kings are sometimes... Nonfictions - Post by : ashwiz - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 2638

Familiar Studies Of Men & Books - Chapter VI. FRANCOIS VILLON, STUDENT, POET, AND HOUSEBREAKER Familiar Studies Of Men & Books - Chapter VI. FRANCOIS VILLON, STUDENT, POET, AND HOUSEBREAKER

Familiar Studies Of Men & Books - Chapter VI. FRANCOIS VILLON, STUDENT, POET, AND HOUSEBREAKER
PERHAPS one of the most curious revolutions in literary history is the sudden bull's-eye light cast by M. Longnon on the obscure existence of Francois Villon. (1) His book is not remarkable merely as a chapter of biography exhumed after four centuries. To readers of the poet it will recall, with a flavour of satire, that characteristic passage in which he bequeaths his spectacles - with a humorous reservation of the case - to the hospital for blind paupers known as the Fifteen-Score. Thus equipped, let the blind paupers go and separate the good from the bad in the cemetery of... Nonfictions - Post by : Mateo1721 - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 3470

Familiar Studies Of Men & Books - Chapter V. YOSHIDA-TORAJIRO Familiar Studies Of Men & Books - Chapter V. YOSHIDA-TORAJIRO

Familiar Studies Of Men & Books - Chapter V. YOSHIDA-TORAJIRO
THE name at the head of this page is probably unknown to the English reader, and yet I think it should become a household word like that of Garibaldi or John Brown. Some day soon, we may expect to hear more fully the details of Yoshida's history, and the degree of his influence in the transformation of Japan; even now there must be Englishmen acquainted with the subject, and perhaps the appearance of this sketch may elicit something more complete and exact. I wish to say that I am not, rightly speaking, the author of the present paper: I tell the... Nonfictions - Post by : Sylvain34 - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 1363

Familiar Studies Of Men & Books - Chapter IV. HENRY DAVID THOREAU: HIS CHARACTER AND OPINIONS Familiar Studies Of Men & Books - Chapter IV. HENRY DAVID THOREAU: HIS CHARACTER AND OPINIONS

Familiar Studies Of Men & Books - Chapter IV. HENRY DAVID THOREAU: HIS CHARACTER AND OPINIONS
I.THOREAU'S thin, penetrating, big-nosed face, even in a bad woodcut, conveys some hint of the limitations of his mind and character. With his almost acid sharpness of insight, with his almost animal dexterity in act, there went none of that large, unconscious geniality of the world's heroes. He was not easy, not ample, not urbane, not even kind; his enjoyment was hardly smiling, or the smile was not broad enough to be convincing; he had no waste lands nor kitchen-midden in his nature, but was all improved and sharpened to a point. "He was bred to no profession," says Emerson; "he... Nonfictions - Post by : SuzanneKnight - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 2714

Familiar Studies Of Men & Books - Chapter III. WALT WHITMAN Familiar Studies Of Men & Books - Chapter III. WALT WHITMAN

Familiar Studies Of Men & Books - Chapter III. WALT WHITMAN
OF late years the name of Walt Whitman has been a good deal bandied about in books and magazines. It has become familiar both in good and ill repute. His works have been largely bespattered with praise by his admirers, and cruelly mauled and mangled by irreverent enemies. Now, whether his poetry is good or bad as poetry, is a matter that may admit of a difference of opinion without alienating those who differ. We could not keep the peace with a man who should put forward claims to taste and yet depreciate the choruses in SAMSON AGONISTES; but, I think,... Nonfictions - Post by : FatGuy - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 1912

Familiar Studies Of Men & Books - Chapter II. SOME ASPECTS OF ROBERT BURNS Familiar Studies Of Men & Books - Chapter II. SOME ASPECTS OF ROBERT BURNS

Familiar Studies Of Men & Books - Chapter II. SOME ASPECTS OF ROBERT BURNS
To write with authority about another man, we must have fellow-feeling and some common ground of experience with our subject. We may praise or blame according as we find him related to us by the best or worst in ourselves; but it is only in virtue of some relationship that we can be his judges, even to condemn. Feelings which we share and understand enter for us into the tissue of the man's character; those to which we are strangers in our own experience we are inclined to regard as blots, exceptions, inconsistencies, and excursions of the diabolic; we conceive them... Nonfictions - Post by : F_Jeff - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 1765

Familiar Studies Of Men & Books - Chapter I. VICTOR HUGO'S ROMANCES Familiar Studies Of Men & Books - Chapter I. VICTOR HUGO'S ROMANCES

Familiar Studies Of Men & Books - Chapter I. VICTOR HUGO'S ROMANCES
Apres le roman pittoresque mais prosaique de Walter Scott il lestera un autre roman a creer, plus beau et plus complet encore selon nous. C'est le roman, a la fois drame et epopee, pittoresque mais poetique, reel mais ideal, vrai mais grand, qui enchassera Walter Scott dans Homere. - Victor Hugo on QUENTIN DURWARD.VICTOR HUGO'S romances occupy an important position in the history of literature; many innovations, timidly made elsewhere, have in them been carried boldly out to their last consequences; much that was indefinite in literary tendencies has attained to definite maturity; many things have come to a point and... Nonfictions - Post by : tabernacle - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 3083

Familiar Studies Of Men & Books - PREFACE BY WAY OF CRITICISM Familiar Studies Of Men & Books - PREFACE BY WAY OF CRITICISM

Familiar Studies Of Men & Books - PREFACE BY WAY OF CRITICISM
THESE studies are collected from the monthly press. One appeared in the NEW QUARTERLY, one in MACMILLAN'S, and the rest in the CORNHILL MAGAZINE. To the CORNHILL I owe a double debt of thanks; first, that I was received there in the very best society, and under the eye of the very best of editors; and second, that the proprietors have allowed me to republish so considerable an amount of copy.These nine worthies have been brought together from many different ages and countries. Not the most erudite of men could be perfectly prepared to deal with so many and such various... Nonfictions - Post by : msm7000 - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 1242

Vailima Letters - Chapter XLIV Vailima Letters - Chapter XLIV

Vailima Letters - Chapter XLIV
VAILIMA, SAMOA,OCT. 6TH, 1894.MY DEAR COLVIN, - We have had quite an interesting month and mostly in consideration of that road which I think I told you was about to be made. It was made without a hitch, though I confess I was considerably surprised. When they got through, I wrote a speech to them, sent it down to a Missionary to be translated, and invited the lot to a feast. I thought a good deal of this feast. The occasion was really interesting. I wanted to pitch it in hot. And I wished to have as many influential witnesses present... Nonfictions - Post by : jdburrus - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 3119

Vailima Letters - Chapter XLIII Vailima Letters - Chapter XLIII

Vailima Letters - Chapter XLIII
VAILIMA, 1894.MY DEAR COLVIN, - This must be a very measly letter. I have been trying hard to get along with ST. IVES. I should now lay it aside for a year and I daresay I should make something of it after all. Instead of that, I have to kick against the pricks, and break myself, and spoil the book, if there were anything to spoil, which I am far from saying. I'm as sick of the thing as ever any one can be; it's a rudderless hulk; it's a pagoda, and you can just feel - or I can feel... Nonfictions - Post by : RonDesorcy - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 1300

Vailima Letters - Chapter XLII Vailima Letters - Chapter XLII

Vailima Letters - Chapter XLII
AUG. 7THMY DEAR COLVIN, - This is to inform you, sir, that on Sunday last (and this is Tuesday) I attained my ideal here, and we had a paper chase in Vailele Plantation, about 15 miles, I take it, from us; and it was all that could be wished. It is really better fun than following the hounds, since you have to be your own hound, and a precious bad hound I was, following every false scent on the whole course to the bitter end; but I came in 3rd at the last on my little Jack, who stuck to it... Nonfictions - Post by : henrymarty - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 2853

Vailima Letters - Chapter XLI Vailima Letters - Chapter XLI

Vailima Letters - Chapter XLI
JULY, 1894.MY DEAR COLVIN, - I have to thank you this time for a very good letter, and will announce for the future, though I cannot now begin to put in practice, good intentions for our correspondence. I will try to return to the old system and write from time to time during the month; but truly you did not much encourage me to continue! However, that is all by- past. I do not know that there is much in your letter that calls for answer. Your questions about ST. IVES were practically answered in my last; so were your wails... Nonfictions - Post by : sphead - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 2868