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Catriona (david Balfour) - PART II. FATHER AND DAUGHTER - CONCLUSION Catriona (david Balfour) - PART II. FATHER AND DAUGHTER - CONCLUSION

Catriona (david Balfour) - PART II. FATHER AND DAUGHTER - CONCLUSION
No sooner were we safe within the walls of Dunkirk than we held a very necessary council-of-war on our position. We had taken a daughter from her father at the sword's point; any judge would give her back to him at once, and by all likelihood clap me and Alan into jail; and though we had an argument upon our side in Captain Palliser's letter, neither Catriona nor I were very keen to be using it in public. Upon all accounts it seemed the most prudent to carry the girl to Paris to the hands of her own chieftain, Macgregor of... Long Stories - Post by : david_br - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 2327

Catriona (david Balfour) - PART II. FATHER AND DAUGHTER - Chapter XXX. THE LETTER FROM THE SHIP Catriona (david Balfour) - PART II. FATHER AND DAUGHTER - Chapter XXX. THE LETTER FROM THE SHIP

Catriona (david Balfour) - PART II. FATHER AND DAUGHTER - Chapter XXX. THE LETTER FROM THE SHIP
Daylight showed us how solitary the inn stood. It was plainly hard upon the sea, yet out of all view of it, and beset on every side with scabbit hills of sand. There was, indeed, only one thing in the nature of a prospect there stood out over a brae the two sails of a windmill, like an ass's ears, but with the ass quite hidden. It was strange (after the wind rose, for at first it was dead calm) to see the turning and following of each other of these great sails behind the hillock. Scarce any road came... Long Stories - Post by : RedSlug - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 1446

Catriona (david Balfour) - PART II. FATHER AND DAUGHTER - Chapter XXIX. WE MEET IN DUNKIRK Catriona (david Balfour) - PART II. FATHER AND DAUGHTER - Chapter XXIX. WE MEET IN DUNKIRK

Catriona (david Balfour) - PART II. FATHER AND DAUGHTER - Chapter XXIX. WE MEET IN DUNKIRK
Altogether, then, I was scare so miserable the next days but what I had many hopeful and happy snatches; threw myself with a good deal of constancy upon my studies; and made out to endure the time till Alan should arrive, or I might hear word of Catriona by the means of James More. I had altogether three letters in the time of our separation. One was to announce their arrival in the town of Dunkirk in France, from which place James shortly after started alone upon a private mission. This was to England and to see Lord Holderness; and it... Long Stories - Post by : littleRock - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 776

Catriona (david Balfour) - PART II. FATHER AND DAUGHTER - Chapter XXVIII. IN WHICH I AM LEFT ALONE Catriona (david Balfour) - PART II. FATHER AND DAUGHTER - Chapter XXVIII. IN WHICH I AM LEFT ALONE

Catriona (david Balfour) - PART II. FATHER AND DAUGHTER - Chapter XXVIII. IN WHICH I AM LEFT ALONE
I opened the door to Catriona and stopped her on the threshold."Your father wishes us to take our walk," said I.She looked to James More, who nodded, and at that, like a trained soldier, she turned to go with me.We took one of our old ways we had gone often together, and been more happy than I can tell of in the past. I came a half a step behind, so that I could watch her unobserved. The knocking of her little shoes upon the way sounded extraordinary pretty and sad; and I thought it a strange moment that I... Long Stories - Post by : pharper - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 1204

Catriona (david Balfour) - PART II. FATHER AND DAUGHTER - Chapter XXVII. A TWOSOME Catriona (david Balfour) - PART II. FATHER AND DAUGHTER - Chapter XXVII. A TWOSOME

Catriona (david Balfour) - PART II. FATHER AND DAUGHTER - Chapter XXVII. A TWOSOME
I believe it was about the fifth day, and I know at least that James was in one of his fits of gloom, when I received three letters. The first was from Alan, offering to visit me in Leyden; the other two were out of Scotland and prompted by the same affair, which was the death of my uncle and my own complete accession to my rights. Rankeillor's was, of course, wholly in the business view; Miss Grant's was like herself, a little more witty than wise, full of blame to me for not having written (though how was I to... Long Stories - Post by : bumper9 - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 1737

Catriona (david Balfour) - PART II. FATHER AND DAUGHTER - Chapter XXVI. THE THREESOME Catriona (david Balfour) - PART II. FATHER AND DAUGHTER - Chapter XXVI. THE THREESOME

Catriona (david Balfour) - PART II. FATHER AND DAUGHTER - Chapter XXVI. THE THREESOME
Whether or not I was to be so much blamed, or rather perhaps pitied, I must leave others to judge. My shrewdness (of which I have a good deal, too) seems not so great with the ladies. No doubt, at the moment when I awaked her, I was thinking a good deal of the effect upon James More; and similarly when I returned and we were all sat down to breakfast, I continued to behave to the young lady with deference and distance; as I still think to have been most wise. Her father had cast doubts upon the innocence of... Long Stories - Post by : goldensuccess - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 997

Catriona (david Balfour) - PART II. FATHER AND DAUGHTER - Chapter XXV. THE RETURN OF JAMES MORE Catriona (david Balfour) - PART II. FATHER AND DAUGHTER - Chapter XXV. THE RETURN OF JAMES MORE

Catriona (david Balfour) - PART II. FATHER AND DAUGHTER - Chapter XXV. THE RETURN OF JAMES MORE
I was called on the morrow out of a late and troubled slumber by a knocking on my door, ran to open it, and had almost swooned with the contrariety of my feelings, mostly painful; for on the threshold, in a rough wraprascal and an extraordinary big laced hat, there stood James More.I ought to have been glad perhaps without admixture, for there was a sense in which the man came like an answer to prayer. I had been saying till my head was weary that Catriona and I must separate, and looking till my head ached for any possible means... Long Stories - Post by : klikmd - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 2395

Catriona (david Balfour) - PART II. FATHER AND DAUGHTER - Chapter XXIV. FULL STORY OF A COPY OF HEINECCIUS Catriona (david Balfour) - PART II. FATHER AND DAUGHTER - Chapter XXIV. FULL STORY OF A COPY OF HEINECCIUS

Catriona (david Balfour) - PART II. FATHER AND DAUGHTER - Chapter XXIV. FULL STORY OF A COPY OF HEINECCIUS
The place found was in the upper part of a house backed on a canal. We had two rooms, the second entering from the first; each had a chimney built out into the floor in the Dutch manner; and being alongside, each had the same prospect from the window of the top of a tree below us in a little court, of a piece of the canal, and of houses in the Hollands architecture and a church spire upon the further side. A full set of bells hung in that spire and made delightful music; and when there was any sun... Long Stories - Post by : dorothy7 - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 3031

Catriona (david Balfour) - PART II. FATHER AND DAUGHTER - Chapter XXIII. TRAVELS IN HOLLAND Catriona (david Balfour) - PART II. FATHER AND DAUGHTER - Chapter XXIII. TRAVELS IN HOLLAND

Catriona (david Balfour) - PART II. FATHER AND DAUGHTER - Chapter XXIII. TRAVELS IN HOLLAND
The rattel-waggon, which is a kind of a long waggon set with benches, carried us in four hours of travel to the great city of Rotterdam. It was long past dark by then, but the streets were pretty brightly lighted and thronged with wild-like, outlandish characters--bearded Hebrews, black men, and the hordes of courtesans, most indecently adorned with finery and stopping seamen by their very sleeves; the clash of talk about us made our heads to whirl; and what was the most unexpected of all, we appeared to be no more struck with all these foreigners than they with us. I... Long Stories - Post by : Allen - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 1081

Catriona (david Balfour) - PART II. FATHER AND DAUGHTER - Chapter XXII. HELVOETSLUYS Catriona (david Balfour) - PART II. FATHER AND DAUGHTER - Chapter XXII. HELVOETSLUYS

Catriona (david Balfour) - PART II. FATHER AND DAUGHTER - Chapter XXII. HELVOETSLUYS
The weather in the end considerably worsened; the wind sang in the shrouds, the sea swelled higher, and the ship began to labour and cry out among the billows. The song of the leadsman in the chains was now scarce ceasing, for we thrid all the way among shoals. About nine in the morning, in a burst of wintry sun between two squalls of hail, I had my first look of Holland--a line of windmills birling in the breeze. It was besides my first knowledge of these daft-like contrivances, which gave me a near sense of foreign travel and a new... Long Stories - Post by : mrushing - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 2559

Catriona (david Balfour) - PART II. FATHER AND DAUGHTER - Chapter XXI. THE VOYAGE INTO HOLLAND Catriona (david Balfour) - PART II. FATHER AND DAUGHTER - Chapter XXI. THE VOYAGE INTO HOLLAND

Catriona (david Balfour) - PART II. FATHER AND DAUGHTER - Chapter XXI. THE VOYAGE INTO HOLLAND
The ship lay at a single anchor, well outside the pier of Leith, so that all we passengers must come to it by the means of skiffs. This was very little troublesome, for the reason that the day was a flat calm, very frosty and cloudy, and with a low shifting fog upon the water. The body of the vessel was thus quite hid as I drew near, but the tall spars of her stood high and bright in a sunshine like the flickering of a fire. She proved to be a very roomy, commodious merchant, but somewhat blunt in the... Long Stories - Post by : promarketing - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 1620

Catriona (david Balfour) - PART I. THE LORD ADVOCATE - Chapter XX. I CONTINUE TO MOVE IN GOOD SOCIETY Catriona (david Balfour) - PART I. THE LORD ADVOCATE - Chapter XX. I CONTINUE TO MOVE IN GOOD SOCIETY

Catriona (david Balfour) - PART I. THE LORD ADVOCATE - Chapter XX. I CONTINUE TO MOVE IN GOOD SOCIETY
For about exactly two months I remained a guest in Prestongrange's family I bettered my acquaintance with the bench, the bar, and the flower of Edinburgh company. You are not to suppose my education was neglected; on the contrary, I was kept extremely busy. I studied the French, so as to be more prepared to go to Leyden; I set myself to the fencing, and wrought hard, sometimes three hours in the day, with notable advancement; at the suggestion of my cousin, Pilrig, who was an apt musician, I was put to a singing class; and by the orders of... Long Stories - Post by : astire - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 1561

Catriona (david Balfour) - PART I. THE LORD ADVOCATE - Chapter XIX. I AM MUCH IN THE HANDS OF THE LADIES Catriona (david Balfour) - PART I. THE LORD ADVOCATE - Chapter XIX. I AM MUCH IN THE HANDS OF THE LADIES

Catriona (david Balfour) - PART I. THE LORD ADVOCATE - Chapter XIX. I AM MUCH IN THE HANDS OF THE LADIES
The copying was a weary business, the more so as I perceived very early there was no sort of urgency in the matters treated, and began very early to consider my employment a pretext. I had no sooner finished than I got to horse, used what remained of daylight to the best purpose, and being at last fairly benighted, slept in a house by Almond-Water side. I was in the saddle again before the day, and the Edinburgh booths were just opening when I clattered in by the West Bow and drew up a smoking horse at my lord Advocate's door.... Long Stories - Post by : peterlionel - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 773

Catriona (david Balfour) - PART I. THE LORD ADVOCATE - Chapter XVIII. THE TEE'D BALL Catriona (david Balfour) - PART I. THE LORD ADVOCATE - Chapter XVIII. THE TEE'D BALL

Catriona (david Balfour) - PART I. THE LORD ADVOCATE - Chapter XVIII. THE TEE'D BALL
On the morrow, from the justices' private room none could see me, I heard the verdict given in and judgment rendered upon James. The Duke's words I am quite sure I have correctly; and since that famous passage has been made a subject of dispute, I may as well commemorate my version. Having referred to the year '45, the chief of the Campbells, sitting as Justice-General upon the bench, thus addressed the unfortunate Stewart before him: "If you had been successful in that rebellion, you might have been giving the law where you have now received the judgment of it;... Long Stories - Post by : phildemarco - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 984

Catriona (david Balfour) - PART I. THE LORD ADVOCATE - Chapter XVII. THE MEMORIAL Catriona (david Balfour) - PART I. THE LORD ADVOCATE - Chapter XVII. THE MEMORIAL

Catriona (david Balfour) - PART I. THE LORD ADVOCATE - Chapter XVII. THE MEMORIAL
The last word of the blessing was scarce out of the minister's mouth before Stewart had me by the arm. We were the first to be forth of the church, and he made such extraordinary expedition that we were safe within the four walls of a house before the street had begun to be thronged with the home-going congregation."Am I yet in time?" I asked."Ay and no," said he. "The case is over; the jury is enclosed, and will so kind as let us ken their view of it to-morrow in the morning, the same as I could have told it... Long Stories - Post by : Jakob - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 715

Catriona (david Balfour) - PART I. THE LORD ADVOCATE - Chapter XVI. THE MISSING WITNESS Catriona (david Balfour) - PART I. THE LORD ADVOCATE - Chapter XVI. THE MISSING WITNESS

Catriona (david Balfour) - PART I. THE LORD ADVOCATE - Chapter XVI. THE MISSING WITNESS
On the seventeenth, the day I was trysted with the Writer, I had much rebellion against fate. The thought of him waiting in the King's Arms, and of what he would think, and what he would say when next we met, tormented and oppressed me. The truth was unbelievable, so much I had to grant, and it seemed cruel hard I should be posted as a liar and a coward, and have never consciously omitted what it was possible that I should do. I repeated this form of words with a kind of bitter relish, and re-examined in that light the... Long Stories - Post by : dingo1 - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 2049

Catriona (david Balfour) - PART I. THE LORD ADVOCATE - Chapter XV. BLACK ANDIE'S TALE OF TOD LAPRAIK Catriona (david Balfour) - PART I. THE LORD ADVOCATE - Chapter XV. BLACK ANDIE'S TALE OF TOD LAPRAIK

Catriona (david Balfour) - PART I. THE LORD ADVOCATE - Chapter XV. BLACK ANDIE'S TALE OF TOD LAPRAIK
I have yet said little of the Highlanders. They were all three of the followers of James More, which bound the accusation very tight about their master's neck. All understood a word or two of English, but Neil was the only one who judged he had enough of it for general converse, in which (when once he got embarked) his company was often tempted to the contrary opinion. They were tractable, simple creatures; showed much more courtesy than might have been expected from their raggedness and their uncouth appearance, and fell spontaneously to be like three servants for Andie and myself.Dwelling... Long Stories - Post by : mcouncil - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 1625

Catriona (david Balfour) - PART I. THE LORD ADVOCATE - Chapter XIV. THE BASS Catriona (david Balfour) - PART I. THE LORD ADVOCATE - Chapter XIV. THE BASS

Catriona (david Balfour) - PART I. THE LORD ADVOCATE - Chapter XIV. THE BASS
I had no thought where they were taking me; only looked here and there for the appearance of a ship; and there ran the while in my head a word of Ransome's--the TWENTY-POUNDERS. If I were to be exposed a second time to that same former danger of the plantations, I judged it must turn ill with me; there was no second Alan; and no second shipwreck and spare yard to be expected now; and I saw myself hoe tobacco under the whip's lash. The thought chilled me; the air was sharp upon the water, the stretchers of the boat drenched... Long Stories - Post by : jalarie - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 1152

Catriona (david Balfour) - PART I. THE LORD ADVOCATE - Chapter XIII. GILLANE SANDS Catriona (david Balfour) - PART I. THE LORD ADVOCATE - Chapter XIII. GILLANE SANDS

Catriona (david Balfour) - PART I. THE LORD ADVOCATE - Chapter XIII. GILLANE SANDS
I did not profit by Alan's pilotage as he had done by his marchings under General Cope; for I can scarce tell what way we went. It is my excuse that we travelled exceeding fast. Some part we ran, some trotted, and the rest walked at a vengeance of a pace. Twice, while we were at top speed, we ran against country-folk; but though we plumped into the first from round a corner, Alan was as ready as a loaded musket."Has ye seen my horse?" he gasped."Na, man, I haenae seen nae horse the day," replied the countryman.And Alan spared the... Long Stories - Post by : efanz - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 3157

Catriona (david Balfour) - PART I. THE LORD ADVOCATE - Chapter XII. ON THE MARCH AGAIN WITH ALAN Catriona (david Balfour) - PART I. THE LORD ADVOCATE - Chapter XII. ON THE MARCH AGAIN WITH ALAN

Catriona (david Balfour) - PART I. THE LORD ADVOCATE - Chapter XII. ON THE MARCH AGAIN WITH ALAN
It was likely between one and two; the moon (as I have said) was down; a strongish wind, carrying a heavy wrack of cloud, had set in suddenly from the west; and we began our movement in as black a night as ever a fugitive or a murderer wanted. The whiteness of the path guided us into the sleeping town of Broughton, thence through Picardy, and beside my old acquaintance the gibbet of the two thieves. A little beyond we made a useful beacon, which was a light in an upper window of Lochend. Steering by this, but a good deal... Long Stories - Post by : Got_Pez - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 1056