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The Green Carnation - Chapter XV The Green Carnation - Chapter XV

The Green Carnation - Chapter XV
CHAPTER XVIt was a romantic evening, and although Lord Reggie prided himself on being altogether impervious to the influences of Nature, he was not unaware that a warm and fantastic twilight may incline the average woman favourably to a suit that she might not be disposed to heed in the early morning, or during the garish sunshine of a summer afternoon. He presumed that Lady Locke was an average woman, simply because he considered all women exceedingly and distinctively average; and therefore, when he saw a soft expression steal into her dark face as she glanced at the faded turquoise of... Long Stories - Post by : wildwilly49707 - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Hichens - Read : 2988

The Green Carnation - Chapter XIV The Green Carnation - Chapter XIV

The Green Carnation - Chapter XIV
CHAPTER XIVWhen Lord Reggie asked Lady Locke to come with him into the yew tree walk that Sunday afternoon, he fully intended to tell her that he would be glad to marry her. It seemed to him that Sunday was a very appropriate day for such a confession, and would give to his remarks a solemnity that they might otherwise lack. But somehow the conversation became immediately unmanageable, as conversations have a knack of doing, and turned into channels which had less than nothing to do with marriage. By a series of ingenious modulations Lord Reggie might doubtless have contrived eventually... Long Stories - Post by : blit519 - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Hichens - Read : 1442

The Green Carnation - Chapter XIII The Green Carnation - Chapter XIII

The Green Carnation - Chapter XIII
CHAPTER XIIISunday afternoon is always a characteristic time. Even irreligious people, who have no principles to send them to sleep, or to cause them to take a weekly walk, or to induce them to write an unnecessary letter to New Zealand--why are unnecessary letters to New Zealand invariably written on Sunday afternoons?--even irreligious people are generally in an unusual frame of mind on the afternoon of the day of rest. They don't feel week-day. There is a certain atmosphere of orthodoxy which affects them. Possibly it causes them to feel peculiarly unorthodox. Still, it affects them. In the country, in summer... Long Stories - Post by : toycruiser - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Hichens - Read : 3570

The Green Carnation - Chapter XII The Green Carnation - Chapter XII

The Green Carnation - Chapter XII
CHAPTER XIIThe cottage was full of the curious suppressed rustling that seems to be inseparable from church-going in England. Good people invariably rustle, and so bad people, trying to be good, are inclined to rustle too. At least that was what Madame Valtesi said as she stood in the tiny, sage-green hall hung with fans, and finished buttoning her long Suede gloves. She still wore her big and shady hat. She declared it made her feel religious, and nobody was prepared to dispute the assertion. Tommy was clamouring for his promised green carnation; but Lord Reggie, in obedience to Lady Locke's... Long Stories - Post by : codend - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Hichens - Read : 1535

The Green Carnation - Chapter XI The Green Carnation - Chapter XI

The Green Carnation - Chapter XI
CHAPTER XILord Reggie had quite made up his mind to ask Lady Locke to marry him. He didn't in the least wish to be married, and felt that he never should. But he also felt that marriage did not matter much either way. In modern days it is a contract of no importance, as Esme Amarinth often said, and therefore a contract that can be entered into without searching of heart or loss of perfect liberty. To him it simply meant that a good-natured woman, who liked to kiss him, would open an account for him at her banker's, and let... Long Stories - Post by : pandj - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Hichens - Read : 1609

The Green Carnation - Chapter X The Green Carnation - Chapter X

The Green Carnation - Chapter X
CHAPTER XChoir-boys at a distance in their surplices are generally charming. Choir-boys close by in mundane suits, bought at a cheap tailor's, or sewed together at home, are not always so attractive. The cherubs' wings with which imagination has endowed them drop off, and they subside into cheeky, and sometimes scrubby, little boys, with a tendency towards peppermints, and a strong bias in favour of slang and tricks. The choir-boys of Chenecote, however, had been well-trained under Mr. Smith's ascetic eye; and though he had not drained the humanity entirely out of them, he had persuaded them to perfect cleanliness, if... Long Stories - Post by : Kommandant - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Hichens - Read : 2388

The Green Carnation - Chapter IX The Green Carnation - Chapter IX

The Green Carnation - Chapter IX
CHAPTER IX"Mother," said Tommy with exceeding great frankness, "I love Lord Reggie.""My dear boy," Lady Locke said, "what a sudden affection! Why, to-day is only Friday, and you never met him until Wednesday. That is quick work.""It's very easy," answered Tommy. "It doesn't take any time. Why should it?""Well, we generally get to like people very much gradually. We find out what they are by degrees, and consider whether they are worth caring for.""I don't," said Tommy. "Directly he came to play at ball with me I loved him. Why shouldn't I?""Tommy, you are very direct," his mother cried, laughing. "Now... Long Stories - Post by : colynbh - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Hichens - Read : 979

The Green Carnation - Chapter VIII The Green Carnation - Chapter VIII

The Green Carnation - Chapter VIII
CHAPTER VIIIEsme Amarinth was generally amusing and whimsical in conversation, but, like other men, he had his special moments, and the half-hour after dinner, when the ladies, longing to remain as invisible listeners, had retired to the bald deserts of feminine society, was usually his time of triumph. His mental stays were then unfastened. He could breathe forth his stories freely. His wittiest jokes, nude, no longer clad in the shadowy garments of more or less conventional propriety, danced like bacchanals through the conversation, and kicked up heels to fire even the weary men of society. He expanded into fantastic anecdote,... Long Stories - Post by : SiteMiracle - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Hichens - Read : 2409

The Green Carnation - Chapter VII The Green Carnation - Chapter VII

The Green Carnation - Chapter VII
CHAPTER VII"Well, what would you all like to do with yourselves to-day?" asked Mrs. Windsor on the following morning after breakfast, which was over at half-past ten, for they all got up early as a mark of respect to the country air; and indeed, Mr. Amarinth declared that he had been awake before five, revelling in the flame-coloured music of the farmyard cocks."I should like to go out shopping," remarked Madame Valtesi, who was dressed in a white serge dress, figured with innocent pink flowers."But, my dear, there are no shops!""There is always a linen-draper's in every village," said Madame Valtesi;... Long Stories - Post by : Bon508 - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Hichens - Read : 760

The Green Carnation - Chapter VI The Green Carnation - Chapter VI

The Green Carnation - Chapter VI
CHAPTER VILady Locke and Lord Reggie were left alone together for the time. Mrs. Windsor had gone into the cottage to write a note, asking the curate of Chenecote to dine the next day. She always asked the curate to dine during the Surrey week. She thought it made things so deliciously rustic. Lord Reggie was still looking very tired, and eating a great many strawberries. He did both mechanically, and as if he didn't know he was doing them. As Lady Locke glanced at him, she felt that he certainly fulfilled her expectations, so far as being cool and young... Long Stories - Post by : expeditebiz - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Hichens - Read : 2449

The Green Carnation - Chapter V The Green Carnation - Chapter V

The Green Carnation - Chapter V
CHAPTER VMrs. Windsor's cottage in Surrey stood on the outskirts of a perfectly charming village called Chenecote, a village just like those so often described in novels of the day. The homes of the poor people were model homes, with lattice windows, and modern improvements. The church was very small, but very trim. The windows were filled with stained glass, designed by Burne-Jones and executed by Morris, and there was a lovely little organ built by Willis, with a _vox humana stop in it, that was like the most pathetic sheep that ever bleated to its lamb. The church and the... Long Stories - Post by : uld4u - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Hichens - Read : 2693

The Green Carnation - Chapter IV The Green Carnation - Chapter IV

The Green Carnation - Chapter IV
CHAPTER IVDuring the few days that elapsed before the advent of the Surrey week, Lady Locke saw a great deal of Lord Reggie, and became a good deal troubled in her mind about him. He was strangely different from all the men and boys whom she had ever known, almost monstrously different, and yet he attracted her. There was something so young about him, and so sensitive, despite the apparent indifference to the opinion of the world, of which he spoke so often, and with such unguarded emphasis. Sometimes she tried to think that he was masquerading, and that a travesty... Long Stories - Post by : nancy - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Hichens - Read : 1922

The Green Carnation - Chapter III The Green Carnation - Chapter III

The Green Carnation - Chapter III
CHAPTER IIIMr. Amarinth and Lord Reggie did not go to bed so early. After the performance of "Faust" was over they strolled arm in arm towards a certain small club that they much affected, a little house tucked into a corner not far from Covent Garden, with a narrow passage instead of a hall, and a long supper-room filled with tiny tables. They made their way gracefully to their own particular table at the end of the room they could converse unheard, and see all that was to be seen. An obsequious waiter--one of the restaurant race that has no... Long Stories - Post by : E-Bookbiz4u - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Hichens - Read : 451

The Green Carnation - Chapter II The Green Carnation - Chapter II

The Green Carnation - Chapter II
CHAPTER II"Jim won't be back till very late, I expect," said Mrs. Windsor to her cousin, as they passed through the hall that night about twelve o'clock, after their return from the opera. "I am tired, and cannot go to my parties. Come to my room, Emily, and we will drink some Bovril, and have a talk. I love drinking Bovril in secret. It seems like a vice. And then it is wholesome, and vices always do something to one--make one's nose red, or bring out wrinkles, or spots, or some horror. Two cups of Bovril, Henderson," she added to the... Long Stories - Post by : monstercovers - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Hichens - Read : 2777

The Green Carnation - Chapter I The Green Carnation - Chapter I

The Green Carnation - Chapter I
CHAPTER IHe slipped a green carnation into his evening coat, fixed it in its place with a pin, and looked at himself in the glass, the long glass that stood near the window of his London bedroom. The summer evening was so bright that he could see his double clearly, even though it was just upon seven o'clock. There he stood in his favourite and most characteristic attitude, with his left knee slightly bent, and his arms hanging at his sides, gazing, as a woman gazes at herself before she starts for a party. The low and continuous murmur of Piccadilly,... Long Stories - Post by : nennito - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Hichens - Read : 3481

Smain; And Safti's Summer Day Smain; And Safti's Summer Day

Smain; And Safti's Summer Day
SMAIN Far away in the desert I heard the sound of a flute, pure sound in the pure air, delicate, sometimes almost comic with the comicality of a child who bends women to kisses and to nonsense-words. We had passed through the sandstorm, Safti and I, over the wastes of saltpetre, and come into a land of palm gardens where there was almost breathless calm. The feet of the camels paddled over the soft brown earth of the narrow alleys between the brown earth walls, and we looked down to right and left into the shady enclosed spaces, seamed with water... Short Stories - Post by : Randal - Date : June 2011 - Author : Robert Hichens - Read : 2498

The Return Of The Soul The Return Of The Soul

The Return Of The Soul
I. _Tuesday Night, November 3rd_. Theories! What is the good of theories? They are the scourges that lash our minds in modern days, lash them into confusion, perplexity, despair. I have never been troubled by them before. Why should I be troubled by them now? And the absurdity of Professor Black's is surely obvious. A child would laugh at it. Yes, a child! I have never been a diary writer. I have never been able to understand the amusement of sitting down late at night and scrawling minutely in some hidden book every paltry incident of one's paltry days. People say... Short Stories - Post by : jasey - Date : June 2011 - Author : Robert Hichens - Read : 2352

The Princess And The Jewel Doctor The Princess And The Jewel Doctor

The Princess And The Jewel Doctor
In St. Petersburg society there may be met at the present time a certain Russian Princess, who is noted for her beauty, for an ugly defect--she has lost the forefinger of her left hand--and for her extraordinary attachment to the city of Tunis she has spent at least three months of each year since 1890--the year in which she suffered the accident that deprived her of a finger. What that accident was, and why she is so passionately attached to Tunis, nobody in Russia seems to know, not even her doting husband, who bows to all her caprices. But two... Short Stories - Post by : merkur - Date : June 2011 - Author : Robert Hichens - Read : 882

The Mission Of Mr. Eustace Greyne The Mission Of Mr. Eustace Greyne

The Mission Of Mr. Eustace Greyne
I Mrs. Eustace Greyne (pronounced Green) wrinkled her forehead--that noble, that startling forehead which had been written about in the newspapers of two hemispheres--laid down her American Squeezer pen, and sighed. It was an autumn day, nipping and melancholy, full of the rustle of dying leaves and the faint sound of muffin bells, and Belgrave Square looked sad even to the great female novelist who had written her way into a mansion there. Fog hung about with the policeman on the pavement. The passing motor cars were like shadows. Their stertorous pantings sounded to Mrs. Greyne's ears like the asthma of... Short Stories - Post by : jackman - Date : June 2011 - Author : Robert Hichens - Read : 1181

Halima And The Scorpions Halima And The Scorpions

Halima And The Scorpions
In travelling about the world one collects a number of those trifles of all sorts, usually named "curiosities," many of them worthless if it were not for the memories they recall. The other day I was clearing out a bureau before going abroad, and in one of the drawers I came across a hedgehog's foot, set in silver, and hung upon a tarnished silver chain. I picked it up in the Sahara, and here is its history. ***** Mohammed El Aid Ben Ali Tidjani, marabout of Tamacine, is a great man in the Sahara Desert. His reputation for piety reaches as... Short Stories - Post by : novice - Date : June 2011 - Author : Robert Hichens - Read : 3071