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Pippa Passes - Epilogue Pippa Passes - Epilogue

Pippa Passes - Epilogue
(SCENE.--PIPPA'S chamber again. She enters it.) The bee with his comb, The mouse at her dray, The grub in his tomb, While winter away; But the firefly and hedge-shrew and lobworm, I pray, 5 How fare they? Ha, ha, thanks for your counsel, my Zanze! (1) "Feast upon lampreys, quaff Breganze"-- The summer of life so easy to spend, And care for tomorrow so soon put away!... Plays - Post by : scorpion - Date : May 2012 - Author : Robert Browning - Read : 2361

Pippa Passes - Scene 3. Evening Pippa Passes - Scene 3. Evening

Pippa Passes - Scene 3. Evening
SCENE III. EVENING(SCENE.--Inside the Turret on the Hill above Asolo. LUIGI and his Mother entering.) Mother. If there blew wind, you'd hear a long sigh, easing The utmost heaviness of music's heart. Luigi. Here in the archway? Mother. Oh, no, no--in farther, Where the echo is made, on the ridge. Luigi.... Plays - Post by : scorpion - Date : May 2012 - Author : Robert Browning - Read : 2713

Pippa Passes - Interlude 2 Pippa Passes - Interlude 2

Pippa Passes - Interlude 2
INTERLUDE II(Talk by the way, while PIPPA is passing from Orcana to the Turret. Two or three of the Austrian Police loitering with BLUPHOCKS, an English vagabond, just in view of the Turret.) Bluphocks. So, that is your Pippa, the little girl who passed us singing? Well, your Bishop's Intendant's money shall be honestly earned:--now, don't make me that sour face because I bring the Bishop's name into the business; we know he can have nothing to do with such 5... Plays - Post by : scorpion - Date : May 2012 - Author : Robert Browning - Read : 2969

Pippa Passes - Scene 2. Noon Pippa Passes - Scene 2. Noon

Pippa Passes - Scene 2. Noon
SCENE II. NOON(SCENE--_Over Orcana. The house of JULES, who crosses its threshold with PHENE: she is silent, on which JULES begins--) Do not die, Phene! I am yours now, you Are mine now; let fate reach me how she likes, If you'll not die: so, never die! Sit here-- My workroom's single seat. I over-lean This length of hair and lustrous front; they turn 5 Like an entire flower upward: eyes, lips, last Your chin--no,... Plays - Post by : scorpion - Date : May 2012 - Author : Robert Browning - Read : 2085

Pippa Passes - Interlude 1 Pippa Passes - Interlude 1

Pippa Passes - Interlude 1
INTERLUDE I(Talk by the way, while PIPPA is passing from the hillside to Orcana. Foreign Students of painting and sculpture, from Venice, assembled opposite the house of JULES, a young French statuary, at Possagno.) 1st Student. Attention! My own post is beneath this window, but the pomegranate clump yonder will hide three or four of you with a little squeezing, and Schramm and his pipe must lie flat in the balcony. Four, five--who's a defaulter? We want everybody, for Jules must not be... Plays - Post by : scorpion - Date : May 2012 - Author : Robert Browning - Read : 3675

Pippa Passes - Scene 1. Morning Pippa Passes - Scene 1. Morning

Pippa Passes - Scene 1. Morning
SCENE I. MORNING(SCENE.--Up the Hillside, inside the Shrub-house. LUCA'S wife, OTTIMA, and her paramour, the German SEBALD.) Sebald (_sings_). _Let the watching lids wink! Day's ablaze with eyes, think! Deep into the night, drink!_ Ottima. Night? Such may be your Rhineland nights, perhaps; But this blood-red beam through the shutter's chink 5... Plays - Post by : scorpion - Date : May 2012 - Author : Robert Browning - Read : 2898

Pippa Passes - Introduction Pippa Passes - Introduction

Pippa Passes - Introduction
NEW YEAR'S DAY AT ASOLO IN THE TREVISAN (A)(SCENE.-_A large, mean, airy chamber. A girl, PIPPA,from the silk-mills, springing out of bed.) Day! Faster and more fast, O'er night's brim, day boils at last; Boils, pure gold, o'er the cloud-cup's brim Where spurting and suppressed it lay, 5 For not a froth-flake touched the rim Of yonder gap in the solid gray... Plays - Post by : scorpion - Date : May 2012 - Author : Robert Browning - Read : 1189

Pippa Passes - Persons Pippa Passes - Persons

Pippa Passes - Persons
PIPPA. OTTIMA. SEBALD. Foreign Students. GOTTLIEB. SCHRAMM. JULES. PHENE. Austrian Police. BLUPHOCKS. LUIGI and his Mother. Poor Girls. MONSIGNOR and his Attendants.... Plays - Post by : scorpion - Date : May 2012 - Author : Robert Browning - Read : 2211

The Guardian-angel The Guardian-angel

The Guardian-angel
A PICTURE AT FANO Dear and great Angel, wouldst thou only leave That child, when thou hast done with him, for me! Let me sit all the day here, that when eve Shall find performed thy special ministry, And time come for departure, thou, suspending 5 Thy flight, mayst see another child for tending, Another still, to quiet and retrieve. Then I shall feel thee step one step,... Poems - Post by : submitking - Date : July 2011 - Author : Robert Browning - Read : 3465

The Flower's Name The Flower's Name

The Flower's Name
Here's the garden she walked across, Arm in my arm, such a short while since; Hark, now I push its wicket, the moss Hinders the hinges and makes them wince! She must have reached this shrub ere she turned, 5 As back with that murmur the wicket swung; For she laid the poor snail, my chance foot spurned, To feed and forget it the leaves among. Down this side... Poems - Post by : BizOpKing - Date : July 2011 - Author : Robert Browning - Read : 3496

Songs From Paracelsus Songs From Paracelsus

Songs From Paracelsus
I"HEAP CASSIA, SANDAL-BUDS, AND STRIPES" Heap cassia, sandal-buds, and stripes Of labdanum, and aloe-balls, Smeared with dull nard an Indian wipes From out her hair; such balsam falls Down sea-side mountain pedestals, 5 From tree-tops where tired winds are fain, Spent with the vast and howling main, To treasure half their island-gain. And strew faint sweetness from... Poems - Post by : wwzeitler - Date : July 2011 - Author : Robert Browning - Read : 1451

A Blot In The 'scutcheon - DRAMATIS PERSONAE A Blot In The 'scutcheon - DRAMATIS PERSONAE

A Blot In The 'scutcheon - DRAMATIS PERSONAE
DRAMATIS PERSONAE MILDRED TRESHAM.GUENDOLEN TRESHAM.THOROLD, Earl TRESHAM.AUSTIN TRESHAM.HENRY, Earl MERTOUN.GERARD, and other retainers of Lord TRESHAM.Time, 17--Content of DRAMATIS PERSONAE (Robert Browning's play/drama: A Blot In The 'Scutcheon)... Plays - Post by : hhistand - Date : June 2011 - Author : Robert Browning - Read : 1775

A Blot In The 'scutcheon - ACT III - SCENE II A Blot In The 'scutcheon - ACT III - SCENE II

A Blot In The 'scutcheon - ACT III - SCENE II
ACT III: SCENE II SCENE II.--MILDRED's Chamber (MILDRED alone)He comes not! I have heard of those who seemedResourceless in prosperity,--you thoughtSorrow might slay them when she listed; yetDid they so gather up their diffused strengthAt her first menace, that they bade her strike,And stood and laughed her subtlest skill to scorn.Oh, 'tis not so with me! The first woe fell,And the rest fall upon it, not on me:Else should I bear that Henry comes not?--failsJust this first night out of so many nights?Loving is done with. Were he sitting now,As... Plays - Post by : Tomas - Date : June 2011 - Author : Robert Browning - Read : 1639

A Blot In The 'scutcheon - ACT III - SCENE I A Blot In The 'scutcheon - ACT III - SCENE I

A Blot In The 'scutcheon - ACT III - SCENE I
ACT III: SCENE I SCENE I.--The end of the Yew-tree Avenue under MILDRED's Window. A light seen through a central red pane (Enter TRESHAM through the trees)Again here! But I cannot lose myself.The heath--the orchard--I have traversed gladesAnd dells and bosky paths which used to leadInto green wild-wood depths, bewilderingMy boy's adventurous step. And now they tendHither or soon or late; the blackest shadeBreaks up, the thronged trunks of the trees ope wide,And the dim turret I have fled from, frontsAgain my step; the very river putIts... Plays - Post by : resalin - Date : June 2011 - Author : Robert Browning - Read : 1020

A Blot In The 'scutcheon - ACT II - SCENE I A Blot In The 'scutcheon - ACT II - SCENE I

A Blot In The 'scutcheon - ACT II - SCENE I
ACT II: SCENE I SCENE.--The Library Enter LORD TRESHAM, hastilyTRESHAM. This way! In, GERARD, quick! (As GERARD enters, TRESHAM secures the door.) Now speak! or, wait--I'll bid you speak directly. (Seats himself.)... Plays - Post by : noniman - Date : June 2011 - Author : Robert Browning - Read : 2422

A Blot In The 'scutcheon - ACT I - SCENE III A Blot In The 'scutcheon - ACT I - SCENE III

A Blot In The 'scutcheon - ACT I - SCENE III
ACT I: SCENE III MILDRED's Chamber. A Painted Window overlooks the Park MILDRED and GUENDOLENGUENDOLEN. Now, MILDRED, spare those pains. I have not leftOur talkers in the library, and climbedThe wearisome ascent to this your bowerIn company with you,--I have not dared...Nay, worked such prodigies as sparing youLord MERTOUN's pedigree before the flood,Which Thorold seemed in very act to tell--Or bringing AUSTIN to pluck up that mostFirm-rooted heresy--your suitor's eyes,He would maintain, were grey instead of blue--I think I brought him to contrition!--Well,I have not done such things, (all to... Plays - Post by : Robert_Newton - Date : June 2011 - Author : Robert Browning - Read : 3252

A Blot In The 'scutcheon - ACT I - SCENE II A Blot In The 'scutcheon - ACT I - SCENE II

A Blot In The 'scutcheon - ACT I - SCENE II
ACT I: SCENE II SCENE II.--A Saloon in the Mansion Enter LORD TRESHAM, LORD MERTOUN, AUSTIN, and GUENDOLENTRESHAM. I welcome you, Lord MERTOUN, yet once more,To this ancestral roof of mine. Your name--Noble among the noblest in itself,Yet taking in your person, fame avers,New price and lustre,--(as that gem you wear,Transmitted from a hundred knightly breasts,Fresh chased and set and fixed by its last lord,Seems to re-kindle at the core)--your nameWould win you welcome!--MERTOUN.... Plays - Post by : pete88cu - Date : June 2011 - Author : Robert Browning - Read : 2490

A Blot In The 'scutcheon - ACT I - SCENE I A Blot In The 'scutcheon - ACT I - SCENE I

A Blot In The 'scutcheon - ACT I - SCENE I
ACT I: SCENE I SCENE I.--The Interior of a Lodge in Lord TRESHAM's Park. Many Retainers crowded at the window, supposed to command a view of the entrance to his Mansion. GERARD, the Warrener, his back to a table on which are flagons, etc.FIRST RETAINER. Ay, do! push, friends, and then you'll push down me!--What for? Does any hear a runner's footOr a steed's trample or a coach-wheel's cry?Is the Earl come or his least poursuivant?But there's no breeding... Plays - Post by : smokenmo - Date : June 2011 - Author : Robert Browning - Read : 2654

A Blot In The 'scutcheon - INTRODUCTORY NOTE A Blot In The 'scutcheon - INTRODUCTORY NOTE

A Blot In The 'scutcheon - INTRODUCTORY NOTE
INTRODUCTORY NOTEROBERT BROWNING stands, in respect to his origin and his career,in marked contrast to the two aristocratic poets beside whose dramashis "Blot in the 'Scutcheon" is here printed. His father was a bankclerk and a dissenter at a time when dissent meant exclusionfrom Society; the poet went neither to one of the great public schoolsnor to Oxford or Cambridge; and no breath of scandal touched his name.Born in London in 1812, he was educated largely by private tutors,and spent two years at London University, but the influence of hisfather, a man of wide reading and cultivated tastes, was probablythe... Plays - Post by : guria - Date : June 2011 - Author : Robert Browning - Read : 1814

Heap Cassia, Sandal-buds, And Stripes Heap Cassia, Sandal-buds, And Stripes

Heap Cassia, Sandal-buds, And Stripes
Heap cassia, sandal-buds, and stripes Of labdanum, and aloe-balls, Smeared with dull nard an Indian wipes From out her hair; such balsam falls Down sea-side mountain pedestals, From tree-tops where tired winds are fain, Spent with the vast and howling main, To treasure half their island-gain. And strew faint sweetness from some old Egyptian's fine worm-eaten shroud Which breaks to dust when once unrolled; Or shredded... Poems - Post by : goldstar - Date : February 2011 - Author : Robert Browning - Read : 2511