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No. 454 (a Prize Fight -- From The Spectator) No. 454 (a Prize Fight -- From The Spectator)

No. 454 (a Prize Fight -- From The Spectator)
Being a Person of insatiable Curiosity, I could not forbear going on Wednesday last to a Place of no small Renown for the Gallantry of the lower Order of Britons, namely, to the Bear-Garden at Hockley in the Hole; where (as a whitish brown Paper, put into my Hands in the Street, inform'd me) there was to be a Tryal of Skill to be exhibited between two Masters of the Noble Science of Defence, at two of the Clock precisely. I was not a little charm'd with the Solemnity of the Challenge, which ran thus: "I James Miller, Serjeant, (lately come... Essays - Post by : Paul_Neilson - Date : October 2011 - Author : Richard Steele - Read : 1563

No. 454 (a Journey From Richmond -- From The Spectator) No. 454 (a Journey From Richmond -- From The Spectator)

No. 454 (a Journey From Richmond -- From The Spectator)
It is an inexpressible Pleasure to know a little of the World, and be of no Character or Significancy in it. To be ever unconcerned, and ever looking on new Objects with an endless Curiosity, is a Delight known only to those who are turned for Speculation: Nay, they who enjoy it, must value things only as they are the Objects of Speculation, without drawing any worldly Advantage to themselves from them, but just as they are what contribute to their Amusement, or the Improvement of the Mind. I lay one Night last Week at Richmond; and being restless, not out... Essays - Post by : kadmon - Date : October 2011 - Author : Richard Steele - Read : 2437

Jack Lizard (no. 24. Guardian) Jack Lizard (no. 24. Guardian)

Jack Lizard (no. 24. Guardian)
Jack Lizard was about Fifteen when he was first entered in the University, and being a Youth of a great deal of Fire, and a more than ordinary Application to his Studies, it gave his Conversation a very particular Turn. He had too much Spirit to hold his Tongue in Company; but at the same time so little Acquaintance with the World, that he did not know how to talk like other People. After a Year and half's stay at the University, he came down among us to pass away a Month or two in the Country. The first Night after... Essays - Post by : AlexR - Date : October 2011 - Author : Richard Steele - Read : 2954

No. 314 (from The Spectator) No. 314 (from The Spectator)

No. 314 (from The Spectator)
No. 314.Friday, February 29, 1712. Steele. Tandem desine Matrem Tempestiva sequi viro. Hor. Od. 23.Feb. 7, 1711-12. Mr. SPECTATOR, I am a young Man about eighteen Years of Age, and have been in Love with a young Woman of the same Age about this half Year. I go to see her six Days in the Week, but never could have the Happiness of being with her alone. If any of her Friends are at home, she will see me in their Company; but if they be not in the Way, she flies to her Chamber. I can discover no... Essays - Post by : markp - Date : September 2011 - Author : Richard Steele - Read : 1147

No. 318 (from The Spectator) No. 318 (from The Spectator)

No. 318 (from The Spectator)
No. 318. Wednesday, March 5, 1712. Steele. (--non omnia possumus omnes. Virg. (1)) Mr. SPECTATOR, A certain Vice which you have lately attacked, has not yet been considered by you as growing so deep in the Heart of Man, that the Affectation outlives the Practice of it. You must have observed that Men who have been bred in Arms preserve to the most extreme and feeble old Age a certain Daring in their Aspect: In like manner, they who have pass'd their Time in Gallantry and Adventure, keep up, as well as they can, the Appearance of it, and... Essays - Post by : mr_ragg - Date : September 2011 - Author : Richard Steele - Read : 3074

No. 320 (from The Spectator) No. 320 (from The Spectator)

No. 320 (from The Spectator)
No. 320Friday, March 7, 1712. Steele. (--non pronuba Juno, Non Hymenaeus adest, non illi Gratia lecto, Eumenides stravere torum. Ovid. (1))Mr. SPECTATOR, You have given many Hints in your Papers to the Disadvantage of Persons of your own Sex, who lay Plots upon Women. Among other hard Words you have published the Term Male-Coquets, and been very severe upon such as give themselves the Liberty of a little Dalliance of Heart, and playing fast and loose, between Love and Indifference, till perhaps an easie young Girl is reduced to Sighs, Dreams and... Essays - Post by : Simon_Grabowski - Date : September 2011 - Author : Richard Steele - Read : 2883

No. 322 (from The Spectator) No. 322 (from The Spectator)

No. 322 (from The Spectator)
No. 322Monday, March 10, 1712. Steele. Ad humum maerore gravi deducit et angit. Hor. It is often said, after a Man has heard a Story with extraordinary Circumstances, It is a very good one if it be true: But as for the following Relation, I should be glad were I sure it were false. It is told with such Simplicity, and there are so many artless Touches of Distress in it, that I fear it comes too much from the Heart. Mr. SPECTATOR, Some Years ago it happened that I lived in the same House with a young Gentleman of Merit;... Essays - Post by : exit9to5 - Date : September 2011 - Author : Richard Steele - Read : 1854

No. 324 (from The Spectator) No. 324 (from The Spectator)

No. 324 (from The Spectator)
No. 324Wednesday, March 12, 1712. Steele. (O curvae in terris animae, et coelestium inanes. Pers (1).) Mr. SPECTATOR, The Materials you have collected together towards a general History of Clubs, make so bright a Part of your Speculations, that I think it is but a Justice we all owe the learned World to furnish you with such Assistances as may promote that useful Work. For this Reason I could not forbear communicating to you some imperfect Informations of a Set of Men (if you will allow them a place in that Species of Being) who have lately erected themselves... Essays - Post by : bruce7872 - Date : September 2011 - Author : Richard Steele - Read : 3153

No. 326 (from The Spectator) No. 326 (from The Spectator)

No. 326 (from The Spectator)
No. 326Friday, March 14, 1712. Steele. Inclusam Danaen turris ahenea Robustaeque fores, et vigilum canum Tristes exubiae, munierant satis Nocturnis ab adulteris; Si non-- Hor.Mr. SPECTATOR, Your Correspondents Letter relating to Fortune-Hunters, and your subsequent Discourse upon it, have given me Encouragement to send you a State of my Case, by which you will see, that the Matter complained of is a common Grievance both to City and Country. I am a Country Gentleman of between five and six thousand a Year. It is my Misfortune to have a very fine Park and an... Essays - Post by : Kuldip - Date : September 2011 - Author : Richard Steele - Read : 1612

No. 330 (from The Spectator) No. 330 (from The Spectator)

No. 330 (from The Spectator)
No. 330Wednesday, March 19, 1712. Steele. Maxima debetur pueris reverentia. Juv. The following Letters, written by two very considerate Correspondents, both under twenty Years of Age, are very good Arguments of the Necessity of taking into Consideration the many Incidents which affect the Education of Youth. SIR, I have long expected, that in the Course of your Observations upon the several Parts of human Life, you would one time or other fall upon a Subject, which, since you have not, I take the liberty to recommend to you. What I mean, is the Patronage of young modest Men to such as... Essays - Post by : P._Campbell - Date : September 2011 - Author : Richard Steele - Read : 3234

No. 332 (from The Spectator) No. 332 (from The Spectator)

No. 332 (from The Spectator)
No. 332Friday, March 21, 1712. Steele. Minus aptus acutis Naribus horum hominum. Hor.Dear Short-Face, In your Speculation of Wednesday last, you have given us some Account of that worthy Society of Brutes the Mohocks; wherein you have particularly specify'd the ingenious Performance of the Lion-Tippers, the Dancing-Masters, and the Tumblers: But as you acknowledge you had not then a perfect History of the whole Club, you might very easily omit one of the most notable Species of it, the Sweaters, which may be reckon'd a sort of Dancing-Masters too. It is it seems the Custom for... Essays - Post by : miscreed - Date : September 2011 - Author : Richard Steele - Read : 3455

No. 334 (from The Spectator) No. 334 (from The Spectator)

No. 334 (from The Spectator)
No. 334Monday, March 24, 1712. Steele Voluisti in suo Genere, unumquemque nostrum quasi quendam esse Roscium, dixistique non tam ea quae recta essent probari, quam quae prava sunt fastidiis adhaerescere. Cicero de Gestu. It is very natural to take for our whole Lives a light Impression of a thing which at first fell into Contempt with us for want of Consideration. The real Use of a certain Qualification (which the wiser Part of Mankind look upon as at best an indifferent thing, and generally a frivolous Circumstance) shews the ill Consequence of such Prepossessions. What I mean, is the Art,... Essays - Post by : trueblue - Date : September 2011 - Author : Richard Steele - Read : 2510

No. 336 (from The Spectator) No. 336 (from The Spectator)

No. 336 (from The Spectator)
No. 336 Wednesday, March 26, 1712. Steele. --Clament periisse pudorem Cuncti pene patres, ea cum reprehendere coner, Quae gravis AEsopus, quae doctus Roscius egit: Vel quia nil rectum, nisi quod placuit sibi, ducunt; Vel quia turpe putant parere minoribus, et, quae Imberbes didicere, senes perdenda fateri. Hor.Mr. SPECTATOR, As you are the daily Endeavourer to promote Learning and good Sense, I think myself obliged to suggest to your Consideration whatever may promote or prejudice them.. There is an Evil which has prevailed from Generation to Generation, which grey Hairs and tyrannical Custom... Essays - Post by : yisraelharris - Date : September 2011 - Author : Richard Steele - Read : 2931

No. 340 (from The Spectator) No. 340 (from The Spectator)

No. 340 (from The Spectator)
No. 340 Monday, March 31, 1712. Steele. Quis novus hic nostris successit sedibus Hospes? Quem sese Ore ferens! quam forti Pectore et Armis! Virg.I take it to be the highest Instance of a noble Mind, to bear great Qualities without discovering in a Man's Behaviour any Consciousness that he is superior to the rest of the World. Or, to say it otherwise, it is the Duty of a great Person so to demean himself, as that whatever Endowments he may have, he may appear to value himself upon no Qualities but such as any Man may arrive... Essays - Post by : ksuth - Date : September 2011 - Author : Richard Steele - Read : 916

No. 342 (from The Spectator) No. 342 (from The Spectator)

No. 342 (from The Spectator)
No. 342Wednesday, April 2, 1712. Steele. Justitiae partes sunt non violare homines: Verecundiae non offendere. Tull. As Regard to Decency is a great Rule of Life in general, but more especially to be consulted by the Female World, I cannot overlook the following Letter which describes an egregious Offender. Mr. SPECTATOR, I was this Day looking over your Papers, and reading in that of December the 6th with great delight, the amiable Grief of Asteria for the Absence of her Husband, it threw me into a great deal of Reflection. I cannot say but this arose very much from the Circumstances... Essays - Post by : mediae - Date : September 2011 - Author : Richard Steele - Read : 2133

No. 344 (from The Spectator) No. 344 (from The Spectator)

No. 344 (from The Spectator)
No. 344 Friday, April 4, 1712. Steele. In solo vivendi causa palato est. Juv. Mr. SPECTATOR, I think it has not yet fallen into your Way to discourse on little Ambition, or the many whimsical Ways Men fall into, to distinguish themselves among their Acquaintance: Such Observations, well pursued, would make a pretty History of low Life. I my self am got into a great Reputation, which arose (as most extraordinary Occurrences in a Man's Life seem to do) from a mere Accident. I was some Days ago unfortunately engaged among a Set of Gentlemen, who esteem a Man according... Essays - Post by : siamrick - Date : September 2011 - Author : Richard Steele - Read : 1216

No. 346 (from The Spectator) No. 346 (from The Spectator)

No. 346 (from The Spectator)
No. 346 Monday, April 7, 1712. Steele. Consuetudinem benignitatis largitioni Munerum longe antepono. Haec est Gravium hominum atque Magnorum; Illa quasi assentatorum populi, multitudinis levitatem voluptate quasi titillantium. Tull. When we consider the Offices of humane Life, there is, methinks, something in what we ordinarily call Generosity, which when carefully examined, seems to flow rather from a loose and unguarded Temper, than an honest and liberal Mind. For this reason it is absolutely necessary that all Liberality should have for its Basis and Support Frugality. By this means the beneficent Spirit works in a Man from the Convictions of Reason,... Essays - Post by : puthranv - Date : August 2011 - Author : Richard Steele - Read : 1566

No. 348 (from The Spectator) No. 348 (from The Spectator)

No. 348 (from The Spectator)
No. 348Wednesday, April 9, 1712. Steele. Invidiam placare paras virtute relicta? Hor.Mr. SPECTATOR, I have not seen you lately at any of the Places where I visit, so that I am afraid you are wholly unacquainted with what passes among my part of the World, who are, tho I say it, without Controversy, the most accomplished and best bred of the Town. Give me leave to tell you, that I am extremely discomposed when I hear Scandal, and am an utter Enemy to all manner of Detraction, and think it the greatest Meanness that People of Distinction can be guilty... Essays - Post by : bsnrjones - Date : August 2011 - Author : Richard Steele - Read : 1661

No. 350 (from The Spectator) No. 350 (from The Spectator)

No. 350 (from The Spectator)
No. 350 Friday, April 11, 1712. Steele. Ea animi elatio quae cernitur in periculis, si Justitia vacat pugnatque pro suis commodis, in vitio est. Tull. CAPTAIN SENTREY was last Night at the Club, and produced a Letter from Ipswich, which his Correspondent desired him to communicate to his Friend the SPECTATOR. It contained an Account of an Engagement between a French Privateer, commanded by one Dominick Pottiere, and a little Vessel of that Place laden with Corn, the Master whereof, as I remember, was one Goodwin. The Englishman defended himself with incredible Bravery, and beat off the French,... Essays - Post by : Spider - Date : August 2011 - Author : Richard Steele - Read : 1451

No. 352 (from The Spectator) No. 352 (from The Spectator)

No. 352 (from The Spectator)
No. 352 Monday, April 14, 1712. Steele. Si ad honestatem nati sumus, ea aut sola expetenda est, aut certe omni pondere gravior est habenda quam reliqua omnia. Tull. Will. Honeycomb was complaining to me yesterday, that the Conversation of the Town is so altered of late Years, that a fine Gentleman is at a loss for Matter to start Discourse, as well as unable to fall in with the Talk he generally meets with. WILL. takes notice, that there is now an Evil under the Sun which he supposes to be entirely new, because not mentioned by any Satyrist or Moralist... Essays - Post by : Netprenaurial - Date : August 2011 - Author : Richard Steele - Read : 3090