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Full Online Book HomeAuthor Paul Laurence DunbarPage 20
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The Race Question The Race Question

The Race Question
Scene--Race track. _Enter old coloured man, seating himself._"Oomph, oomph. De work of de devil sho' do p'ospah. How 'do, suh? Des tol'able, thankee, suh. How you come on? Oh, I was des a-sayin' how de wo'k of de ol' boy do p'ospah. Doesn't I frequent the racetrack? No, suh; no, suh. I's Baptis' myse'f, an' I 'low hit's all devil's doin's. Wouldn't 'a' be'n hyeah to-day, but I got a boy named Jim dat's long gone in sin an' he gwine ride one dem hosses. Oomph, dat boy! I sut'ny has talked to him and labohed wid him night an' day,... Short Stories - Post by : rubyfusion - Date : January 2011 - Author : Paul Laurence Dunbar - Read : 3433

A Defender Of The Faith A Defender Of The Faith

A Defender Of The Faith
There was a very animated discussion going on, on the lower floor of the house Number Ten "D" Street. House Number Ten was the middle one of a row of more frames, which formed what was put down on the real estate agent's list as a coloured neighbourhood. The inhabitants of the little cottages were people so poor that they were constantly staggering on the verge of the abyss, which they had been taught to dread and scorn, and why, clearly. Life with them was no dream, but a hard, terrible reality, which meant increasing struggle, and little wonder then that... Short Stories - Post by : Jay_Jennings - Date : January 2011 - Author : Paul Laurence Dunbar - Read : 2918

Cahoots Cahoots

Cahoots
In the centre of the quaint old Virginia grave-yard stood two monuments side by side--two plain granite shafts exactly alike. On one was inscribed the name Robert Vaughan Fairfax and the year 1864. On the other was the simple and perplexing inscription, "Cahoots." Nothing more.The place had been the orchard of one of the ante-bellum mansions before the dead that were brought back from the terrible field of Malvern Hill and laid there had given it a start as a cemetery. Many familiar names were chiselled on the granite head-stones, and anyone conversant with Virginia genealogy would have known them to... Short Stories - Post by : Makers_Mark - Date : January 2011 - Author : Paul Laurence Dunbar - Read : 3566

The Promoter The Promoter

The Promoter
Even as early as September, in the year of 1870, the newly emancipated had awakened to the perception of the commercial advantages of freedom, and had begun to lay snares to catch the fleet and elusive dollar. Those controversialists who say that the Negro's only idea of freedom was to live without work are either wrong, malicious, or they did not know Little Africa when the boom was on; when every little African, fresh from the fields and cabins, dreamed only of untold wealth and of mansions in which he would have been thoroughly uncomfortable. These were the devil's sunny days,... Short Stories - Post by : almills - Date : January 2011 - Author : Paul Laurence Dunbar - Read : 2629

The Wisdom Of Silence The Wisdom Of Silence

The Wisdom Of Silence
Jeremiah Anderson was free. He had been free for ten years, and he was proud of it. He had been proud of it from the beginning, and that was the reason that he was one of the first to cast off the bonds of his old relations, and move from the plantation and take up land for himself. He was anxious to cut himself off from all that bound him to his former life. So strong was this feeling in him that he would not consent to stay on and work for his one-time owner even for a full wage.To the... Short Stories - Post by : trout1 - Date : January 2011 - Author : Paul Laurence Dunbar - Read : 3037

The Triumph Of Ol' Mis' Pease The Triumph Of Ol' Mis' Pease

The Triumph Of Ol' Mis' Pease
Between the two women, the feud began in this way: When Ann Pease divorced her handsome but profligate spouse, William, Nancy Rogers had, with reprehensible haste, taken him for better or for worse. Of course, it proved for worse, but Ann Pease had never forgiven her."'Pears lak to me," she said, "dat she was des a-waitin' fu' to step inter my shoes, no mattah how I got outen 'em, whethah I died or divo'ced."It was in the hey-day of Nancy Rogers' youth, and she was still hot-tempered, so she retorted that "Ann Pease sut'ny did unmind huh' o' de dawg in... Short Stories - Post by : Romero - Date : January 2011 - Author : Paul Laurence Dunbar - Read : 2189

The Lynching Of Jube Benson The Lynching Of Jube Benson

The Lynching Of Jube Benson
Gordon Fairfax's library held but three men, but the air was dense with clouds of smoke. The talk had drifted from one topic to another much as the smoke wreaths had puffed, floated, and thinned away. Then Handon Gay, who was an ambitious young reporter, spoke of a lynching story in a recent magazine, and the matter of punishment without trial put new life into the conversation."I should like to see a real lynching," said Gay rather callously."Well, I should hardly express it that way," said Fairfax, "but if a real, live lynching were to come my way, I should not... Short Stories - Post by : katsu - Date : January 2011 - Author : Paul Laurence Dunbar - Read : 2769

Schwalliger's Philanthropy Schwalliger's Philanthropy

Schwalliger's Philanthropy
There is no adequate reason why Schwalliger's name should appear upon the pages of history. He was decidedly not in good society. He was not even respectable as respectability goes. But certain men liked him and certain women loved him. He is dead. That is all that will be said of the most of us after a while. He was but a weak member of the community, but those who loved him did not condemn him, and they shut their eyes to his shortcomings because they were a part of him. Without his follies he would not have been himself.Schwalliger was... Short Stories - Post by : KirkM - Date : January 2011 - Author : Paul Laurence Dunbar - Read : 1806

The Interference Of Patsy Ann The Interference Of Patsy Ann

The Interference Of Patsy Ann
Patsy Ann Meriweather would have told you that her father, or more properly her "pappy," was a "widover," and she would have added in her sad little voice, with her mournful eyes upon you, that her mother had "bin daid fu' nigh onto fou' yeahs." Then you could have wept for Patsy, for her years were only thirteen now, and since the passing away of her mother she had been the little mother for her four younger brothers and sisters, as well as her father's house-keeper.But Patsy Ann never complained; she was quite willing to be all that she had been... Short Stories - Post by : mlfrenzy - Date : January 2011 - Author : Paul Laurence Dunbar - Read : 1595

The Home-coming Of 'rastus Smith The Home-coming Of 'rastus Smith

The Home-coming Of 'rastus Smith
There was a great commotion in that part of town which was known as "Little Africa," and the cause of it was not far to seek. Contrary to the usual thing, this cause was not an excursion down the river, nor a revival, baptising, nor an Emancipation Day celebration. None of these was it that had aroused the denizens of "Little Africa," and kept them talking across the street from window to window, from door to door, through alley gates, over backyard fences they stood loud-mouthed and arms akimboed among laden clothes lines. No, the cause of it all was... Short Stories - Post by : wshi88 - Date : January 2011 - Author : Paul Laurence Dunbar - Read : 1414

The Boy And The Bayonet The Boy And The Bayonet

The Boy And The Bayonet
It was June, and nearing the closing time of school. The air was full of the sound of bustle and preparation for the final exercises, field day, and drills. Drills especially, for nothing so gladdens the heart of the Washington mother, be she black or white, as seeing her boy in the blue cadet's uniform, marching proudly to the huzzas of an admiring crowd. Then she forgets the many nights when he has come in tired out and dusty from his practice drill, and feels only the pride and elation of the result.Although Tom did all he could outside of study... Short Stories - Post by : dontworkforever - Date : January 2011 - Author : Paul Laurence Dunbar - Read : 3413