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Puppets And Actors Puppets And Actors

Puppets And Actors
(Daily Telegraph, February 20, 1892.)To the Editor of the Daily Telegraph.SIR,--I have just been sent an article that seems to have appeared in your paper some days ago, {1} in which it is stated that, in the course of some remarks addressed to the Playgoers' Club on the occasion of my taking the chair at their last meeting, I laid it down as an axiom that the stage is only 'a frame furnished with a set of puppets.'Footnote:{1} February 12, 1892.Now, it is quite true that I hold that the stage is to a play no more than a picture-frame is... Essays - Post by : bikeinfo - Date : December 2010 - Author : Oscar Wilde - Read : 2570

A House Of Pomegranates A House Of Pomegranates

A House Of Pomegranates
I.(Speaker, December 5, 1891.)SIR.--I have just purchased, at a price that for any other English sixpenny paper I would have considered exorbitant, a copy of the Speaker at one of the charming kiosks that decorate Paris; institutions, by the way, that I think we should at once introduce into London. The kiosk is a delightful object, and, when illuminated at night from within, as lovely as a fantastic Chinese lantern, especially when the transparent advertisements are from the clever pencil of M. Cheret. In London we have merely the ill-clad newsvendor, whose voice, in spite of the admirable efforts of the... Essays - Post by : tramsguy - Date : December 2010 - Author : Oscar Wilde - Read : 2721

An Anglo-indian's Complaint An Anglo-indian's Complaint

An Anglo-indian's Complaint
(Times, September 26, 1891.)To the Editor of the Times.SIR,--The writer of a letter signed 'An Indian Civilian' that appears in your issue of today makes a statement about me which I beg you to allow me to correct at once.He says I have described the Anglo-Indians as being vulgar. This is not the case. Indeed, I have never met a vulgar Anglo-Indian. There may be many, but those whom I have had the pleasure of meeting here have been chiefly scholars, men interested in art and thought, men of cultivation; nearly all of them have been exceedingly brilliant talkers; some of... Essays - Post by : smashface - Date : December 2010 - Author : Oscar Wilde - Read : 3867

Letters On Dorian Gray Letters On Dorian Gray

Letters On Dorian Gray
I. MR. WILDE'S BAD CASE(St. James's Gazette, June 26, 1890.)To the Editor of the St. James's Gazette.SIR,--I have read your criticism of my story, The Picture of Dorian Gray; and I need hardly say that I do not propose to discuss its merits or demerits, its personalities or its lack of personality. England is a free country, and ordinary English criticism is perfectly free and easy. Besides, I must admit that, either from temperament or taste, or from both, I am quite incapable of understanding how any work of art can be criticised from a moral standpoint. The sphere of art... Essays - Post by : leesumm - Date : December 2010 - Author : Oscar Wilde - Read : 2422

Letter To Joaquin Miller Letter To Joaquin Miller

Letter To Joaquin Miller
Written to Mr. Joaquin Miller in reply to a letter, dated February 9, 1882, in reference to the behaviour of a section of the audience at Wilde's lecture on the English Renaissance at the Grand Opera House, Rochester, New York State, on February 7. It was first published in a volume called Decorative Art in America, containing unauthorised reprints of certain reviews and letters contributed by Wilde to English newspapers. (New York: Brentano's, 1906.)St. Louis, February 28, 1882.MY DEAR JOAQUIN MILLER,--I thank you for your chivalrous and courteous letter. Believe me, I would as lief judge of the strength and splendour... Essays - Post by : NiallR - Date : December 2010 - Author : Oscar Wilde - Read : 2264

English Poetesses English Poetesses

English Poetesses
(Queen, December 8, 1888.)England has given to the world one great poetess, Elizabeth Barrett Browning. By her side Mr. Swinburne would place Miss Christina Rossetti, whose New Year hymn he describes as so much the noblest of sacred poems in our language, that there is none which comes near it enough to stand second. 'It is a hymn,' he tells us, 'touched as with the fire, and bathed as in the light of sunbeams, tuned as to chords and cadences of refluent sea-music beyond reach of harp and organ, large echoes of the serene and sonorous tides of heaven.' Much as... Essays - Post by : gofermatch - Date : December 2010 - Author : Oscar Wilde - Read : 3366

The Close Of The Arts And Crafts The Close Of The Arts And Crafts

The Close Of The Arts And Crafts
(Pall Mall Gazette, November 30, 1888.)Mr. Walter Crane, the President of the Society of Arts and Crafts, was greeted last night by such an enormous audience that at one time the honorary secretary became alarmed for the safety of the cartoons, and many people were unable to gain admission at all. However, order was soon established, and Mr. Cobden-Sanderson stepped up on to the platform and in a few pleasantly sententious phrases introduced Mr. Crane as one who had always been 'the advocate of great and unpopular causes,' and the aim of whose art was 'joy in widest commonalty spread.' Mr.... Essays - Post by : igor888 - Date : December 2010 - Author : Oscar Wilde - Read : 3813

The Beauties Of Bookbinding The Beauties Of Bookbinding

The Beauties Of Bookbinding
(Pall Mall Gazette, November 23, 1888.)'The beginning of art,' said Mr. Cobden-Sanderson last night in his charming lecture on Bookbinding, 'is man thinking about the universe.' He desires to give expression to the joy and wonder that he feels at the marvels that surround him, and invents a form of beauty through which he utters the thought or feeling that is in him. And bookbinding ranks amongst the arts: 'through it a man expresses himself.'This elegant and pleasantly exaggerated exordium preceded some very practical demonstrations. 'The apron is the banner of the future!' exclaimed the lecturer, and he took his coat... Essays - Post by : tomcat - Date : December 2010 - Author : Oscar Wilde - Read : 3545

Printing And Printers Printing And Printers

Printing And Printers
(Pall Mall Gazette, November 16, 1888.)Nothing could have been better than Mr. Emery Walker's lecture on Letterpress Printing and Illustration, delivered last night at the Arts and Crafts. A series of most interesting specimens of old printed books and manuscripts was displayed on the screen by means of the magic-lantern, and Mr. Walker's explanations were as clear and simple as his suggestions were admirable. He began by explaining the different kinds of type and how they are made, and showed specimens of the old block-printing which preceded the movable type and is still used in China. He pointed out the intimate... Essays - Post by : westbourne - Date : December 2010 - Author : Oscar Wilde - Read : 3071

Sculpture At The Arts And Crafts Sculpture At The Arts And Crafts

Sculpture At The Arts And Crafts
(Pall Mall Gazette, November 9, 1888.)The most satisfactory thing in Mr. Simonds' lecture last night was the peroration, in which he told the audience that 'an artist cannot be made.' But for this well-timed warning some deluded people might have gone away under the impression that sculpture was a sort of mechanical process within the reach of the meanest capabilities. For it must be confessed that Mr. Simonds' lecture was at once too elementary and too elaborately technical. The ordinary art student, even the ordinary studio-loafer, could not have learned anything from it, while the 'cultured person,' of whom there were... Essays - Post by : catbalou_tess - Date : December 2010 - Author : Oscar Wilde - Read : 1558

Mr Morris On Tapestry Mr Morris On Tapestry

Mr Morris On Tapestry
(Pall Mall Gazette, November 2, 1888.)Yesterday evening Mr. William Morris delivered a most interesting and fascinating lecture on Carpet and Tapestry Weaving at the Arts and Crafts Exhibition now held at the New Gallery. Mr. Morris had small practical models of the two looms used, the carpet loom where the weaver sits in front of his work; the more elaborate tapestry loom where the weaver sits behind, at the back of the stuff, has his design outlined on the upright threads and sees in a mirror the shadow of the pattern and picture as it grows gradually to perfection. He spoke... Essays - Post by : imported_n/a - Date : December 2010 - Author : Oscar Wilde - Read : 3651

Art At Willis's Rooms Art At Willis's Rooms

Art At Willis's Rooms
(Sunday Times, December 25, 1887.)Accepting a suggestion made by a friendly critic last week, Mr. Selwyn Image began his second lecture by explaining more fully what he meant by literary art, and pointed out the difference between an ordinary illustration to a book and such creative and original works as Michael Angelo's fresco of The Expulsion from Eden and Rossetti's Beata Beatrix. In the latter case the artist treats literature as if it were life itself, and gives a new and delightful form to what seer or singer has shown us; in the former we have merely a translation which misses... Essays - Post by : jusrite - Date : December 2010 - Author : Oscar Wilde - Read : 3361

The Unity Of The Arts. A Lecture And A Five O'clock The Unity Of The Arts. A Lecture And A Five O'clock

The Unity Of The Arts. A Lecture And A Five O'clock
(Pall Mall Gazette, December 12, 1887.)Last Saturday afternoon, at Willis's Rooms, Mr. Selwyn Image delivered the first of a series of four lectures on Modern Art before a select and distinguished audience. The chief point on which he dwelt was the absolute unity of all the arts and, in order to convey this idea, he framed a definition wide enough to include Shakespeare's King Lear and Michael Angelo's Creation, Paul Veronese's picture of Alexander and Darius, and Gibbon's description of the entry of Heliogabalus into Rome. All these he regarded as so many expressions of man's thoughts and emotions on fine... Essays - Post by : howel - Date : December 2010 - Author : Oscar Wilde - Read : 2815

The American Invasion The American Invasion

The American Invasion
(Court and Society Review, March 23, 1887.)A terrible danger is hanging over the Americans in London. Their future and their reputation this season depend entirely on the success of Buffalo Bill and Mrs. Brown-Potter. The former is certain to draw; for English people are far more interested in American barbarism than they are in American civilisation. When they sight Sandy Hook they look to their rifles and ammunition; and, after dining once at Delmonico's, start off for Colorado or California, for Montana or the Yellow Stone Park. Rocky Mountains charm them more than riotous millionaires; they have been known to prefer... Essays - Post by : john_kennedy - Date : December 2010 - Author : Oscar Wilde - Read : 3844

Keats's Sonnet On Blue Keats's Sonnet On Blue

Keats's Sonnet On Blue
(Century Guild Hobby Horse, July 1886.)During my tour in America I happened one evening to find myself in Louisville, Kentucky. The subject I had selected to speak on was the Mission of Art in the Nineteenth Century, and in the course of my lecture I had occasion to quote Keats's Sonnet on Blue as an example of the poet's delicate sense of colour-harmonies. When my lecture was concluded there came round to see me a lady of middle age, with a sweet gentle manner and a most musical voice. She introduced herself to me as Mrs. Speed, the daughter of George... Essays - Post by : CaptainLou - Date : December 2010 - Author : Oscar Wilde - Read : 1494

The Relation Of Dress To Art. A Note In Black And White On Mr. Whistler's Lecture The Relation Of Dress To Art. A Note In Black And White On Mr. Whistler's Lecture

The Relation Of Dress To Art. A Note In Black And White On Mr. Whistler's Lecture
(Pall Mall Gazette, February 28, 1885.)'How can you possibly paint these ugly three-cornered hats?' asked a reckless art critic once of Sir Joshua Reynolds. 'I see light and shade in them,' answered the artist. 'Les grands coloristes,' says Baudelaire, in a charming article on the artistic value of frock coats, 'les grands coloristes savent faire de la couleur avec un habit noir, une cravate blanche, et un fond gris.''Art seeks and finds the beautiful in all times, as did her high priest Rembrandt, when he saw the picturesque grandeur of the Jews' quarter of Amsterdam, and lamented not that its inhabitants... Essays - Post by : sweetsuccess - Date : December 2010 - Author : Oscar Wilde - Read : 2324

Mr Whistler's Ten O'clock Mr Whistler's Ten O'clock

Mr Whistler's Ten O'clock
(Pall Mall Gazette, February 21, 1885.)Last night, at Prince's Hall, Mr. Whistler made his first public appearance as a lecturer on art, and spoke for more than an hour with really marvellous eloquence on the absolute uselessness of all lectures of the kind. Mr. Whistler began his lecture with a very pretty aria on prehistoric history, describing how in earlier times hunter and warrior would go forth to chase and foray, while the artist sat at home making cup and bowl for their service. Rude imitations of nature they were first, like the gourd bottle, till the sense of beauty and... Essays - Post by : bsmbahamas - Date : December 2010 - Author : Oscar Wilde - Read : 1618

More Radical Ideas Upon Dress Reform More Radical Ideas Upon Dress Reform

More Radical Ideas Upon Dress Reform
(Pall Mall Gazette, November 11, 1884.)I have been much interested at reading the large amount of correspondence that has been called forth by my recent lecture on Dress. It shows me that the subject of dress reform is one that is occupying many wise and charming people, who have at heart the principles of health, freedom, and beauty in costume, and I hope that 'H. B. T.' and 'Materfamilias' will have all the real influence which their letters--excellent letters both of them--certainly deserve.I turn first to Mr. Huyshe's second letter, and the drawing that accompanies it; but before entering into any... Essays - Post by : BMInvest - Date : December 2010 - Author : Oscar Wilde - Read : 1502

Women's Dress Women's Dress

Women's Dress
(Pall Mall Gazette, October 14, 1884.)Mr. Oscar Wilde, who asks us to permit him 'that most charming of all pleasures, the pleasure of answering one's critics,' sends us the following remarks:--The 'Girl Graduate' must of course have precedence, not merely for her sex but for her sanity: her letter is extremely sensible. She makes two points: that high heels are a necessity for any lady who wishes to keep her dress clean from the Stygian mud of our streets, and that without a tight corset 'the ordinary number of petticoats and etceteras' cannot be properly or conveniently held up. Now, it... Essays - Post by : rlscott - Date : December 2010 - Author : Oscar Wilde - Read : 2785

Mrs. Langtry As Hester Grazebrook Mrs. Langtry As Hester Grazebrook

Mrs. Langtry As Hester Grazebrook
(New York World, November 7, 1882.)It is only in the best Greek gems, on the silver coins of Syracuse, or among the marble figures of the Parthenon frieze, that one can find the ideal representation of the marvellous beauty of that face which laughed through the leaves last night as Hester Grazebrook.Pure Greek it is, with the grave low forehead, the exquisitely arched brow; the noble chiselling of the mouth, shaped as if it were the mouthpiece of an instrument of music; the supreme and splendid curve of the cheek; the augustly pillared throat which bears it all: it is Greek,... Essays - Post by : Panky - Date : December 2010 - Author : Oscar Wilde - Read : 1597