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Full Online Book HomeAuthor Oscar WildePage 1
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Miscellaneous Aphorisms Miscellaneous Aphorisms

Miscellaneous Aphorisms
The mystery of love is greater than the mystery of death. Women are made to be loved, not to be understood. It is absurd to have a hard and fast rule about what one should read and what one shouldn't. Moren than half of modern culture depends on what one shouldn't read. Women, as someone says, love with their ears, just as men love with their eyes, if they ever love at all. It is better to be beautiful than to be good, but it is better to be good than to be ugly. Nothing looks so like innocence as an... Essays - Post by : eLogo - Date : October 2011 - Author : Oscar Wilde - Read : 1699

Picture Of Dorian Gray - Chapter XIII: 94-100 Picture Of Dorian Gray - Chapter XIII: 94-100

Picture Of Dorian Gray - Chapter XIII: 94-100
Chapter XIII: 94-100(94) "There is no good telling me you are going to be good, Dorian,"cried Lord Henry, dipping his white fingers into a red copper bowlfilled with rose-water. "You are quite perfect. Pray don't change."Dorian shook his head. "No, Harry, I have done too many dreadfulthings in my life. I am not going to do any more. I began my goodactions yesterday.""Where were you yesterday?""In the country, Harry. I was staying at a little inn by myself.""My dear boy," said Lord Henry smiling, "anybody can be good in thecountry. There are no temptations... Long Stories - Post by : ferret - Date : June 2011 - Author : Oscar Wilde - Read : 1544

Picture Of Dorian Gray - Chapter XII: 86-93 Picture Of Dorian Gray - Chapter XII: 86-93

Picture Of Dorian Gray - Chapter XII: 86-93
Chapter XII: 86-93(...86) At nine o'clock the next morning his servant came in with acup of chocolate on a tray, and opened the shutters. Dorian wassleeping quite peacefully, lying on his right side, with one handunderneath his cheek. He looked like a boy who had been tired outwith play, or study.The man had to touch him twice on the shoulder before he woke, and ashe opened his eyes a faint smile passed across his lips, as though hehad been having some delightful dream. Yet he had not dreamed atall. His night had been untroubled by any images... Long Stories - Post by : rcroy - Date : June 2011 - Author : Oscar Wilde - Read : 1872

Picture Of Dorian Gray - Chapter XI: 81-86 Picture Of Dorian Gray - Chapter XI: 81-86

Picture Of Dorian Gray - Chapter XI: 81-86
Chapter XI: 81-86(...81) He passed out of the room, and began the ascent, BasilHallward following close behind. They walked softly, as meninstinctively do at night. The lamp cast fantastic shadows on thewall and staircase. A rising wind made some of the windows rattle.When they reached the top landing, Dorian set the lamp down on thefloor, and taking out the key turned it in the lock. "You insist onknowing, Basil?" he asked, in a low voice."Yes.""I am delighted," he murmured, smiling. Then he added, somewhatbitterly, "You are the one man in the world who is entitled to... Long Stories - Post by : mrhits - Date : June 2011 - Author : Oscar Wilde - Read : 2339

Picture Of Dorian Gray - Chapter X: 77-81 Picture Of Dorian Gray - Chapter X: 77-81

Picture Of Dorian Gray - Chapter X: 77-81
Chapter X: 77-81(...77) It was on the 7th of November, the eve of his own thirty-second birthday, as he often remembered afterwards.He was walking home about eleven o'clock from Lord Henry's hehad been dining, and was wrapped in heavy furs, as the night was coldand foggy. At the corner of Grosvenor Square and South Audley Streeta man passed him in the mist, walking very fast, and with the collarof his gray ulster turned up. He had a bag in his hand. Herecognized him. It was Basil Hallward. A strange sense of fear, forwhich he could... Long Stories - Post by : Hilton - Date : June 2011 - Author : Oscar Wilde - Read : 1755

Picture Of Dorian Gray - Chapter IX: 65-77 Picture Of Dorian Gray - Chapter IX: 65-77

Picture Of Dorian Gray - Chapter IX: 65-77
Chapter IX: 65-77(65) For years, Dorian Gray could not free himself from the memory ofthis book. Or perhaps it would be more accurate to say that he neversought to free himself from it. He procured from Paris no less thanfive large-paper copies of the first edition, and had them bound indifferent colors, so that they might suit his various moods and thechanging fancies of a nature over which he seemed, at times, to havealmost entirely lost control. The hero, the wonderful youngParisian, in whom the romantic temperament and the scientifictemperament were so strangely blended, became to him a... Long Stories - Post by : profitb2 - Date : June 2011 - Author : Oscar Wilde - Read : 3241

Picture Of Dorian Gray - Chapter VIII: 58-64 Picture Of Dorian Gray - Chapter VIII: 58-64

Picture Of Dorian Gray - Chapter VIII: 58-64
Chapter VIII: 58-64(...58) When his servant entered, he looked at him steadfastly, andwondered if he had thought of peering behind the screen. The man wasquite impassive, and waited for his orders. Dorian lit a cigarette,(59) and walked over to the glass and glanced into it. He could seethe reflection of Victor's face perfectly. It was like a placid maskof servility. There was nothing to be afraid of, there. Yet hethought it best to be on his guard.Speaking very slowly, he told him to tell the housekeeper that hewanted to see her, and then to go... Long Stories - Post by : dburt49 - Date : June 2011 - Author : Oscar Wilde - Read : 3078

Picture Of Dorian Gray - Chapter VII: 52-58 Picture Of Dorian Gray - Chapter VII: 52-58

Picture Of Dorian Gray - Chapter VII: 52-58
Chapter VII: 52-58(...52) As he was sitting at breakfast next morning, Basil Hallwardwas shown into the room."I am so glad I have found you, Dorian," he said, gravely. "I calledlast night, and they told me you were at the Opera. Of course I knewthat was impossible. But I wish you had left word where you hadreally gone to. I passed a dreadful evening, half afraid that onetragedy might be followed by another. I think you might havetelegraphed for me when you heard of it first. I read of it quite bychance in a late edition... Long Stories - Post by : GBoyd - Date : June 2011 - Author : Oscar Wilde - Read : 3245

Picture Of Dorian Gray - Chapter VI: 43-52 Picture Of Dorian Gray - Chapter VI: 43-52

Picture Of Dorian Gray - Chapter VI: 43-52
Chapter VI: 43-52(...43) It was long past noon when he awoke. His valet had creptseveral times into the room on tiptoe to see if he was stirring, andhad wondered what made his young master sleep so late. Finally hisbell sounded, and Victor came in softly with a cup of tea, and a pileof letters, on a small tray of old Sevres china, and drew back theolive-satin curtains, with their shimmering blue lining, that hung infront of the three tall windows."Monsieur has well slept this morning," he said, smiling."What o'clock is it, Victor?" asked Dorian Gray, sleepily."One hour and a... Long Stories - Post by : Akogo - Date : June 2011 - Author : Oscar Wilde - Read : 1303

Picture Of Dorian Gray - Chapter V: 36-43 Picture Of Dorian Gray - Chapter V: 36-43

Picture Of Dorian Gray - Chapter V: 36-43
Chapter V: 36-43(...36) For some reason or other, the house was crowded that night,and the fat Jew manager who met them at the door was beaming from earto ear with an oily, tremulous smile. He escorted them to their boxwith a sort of pompous humility, waving his fat jewelled hands, andtalking at the top of his voice. Dorian Gray loathed him more thanever. He felt as if he had come to look for Miranda and had been metby Caliban. Lord Henry, upon the other hand, rather liked him. Atleast he declared he did, and insisted on... Long Stories - Post by : temudry - Date : June 2011 - Author : Oscar Wilde - Read : 2500

Picture Of Dorian Gray - Chapter IV: 32-36 Picture Of Dorian Gray - Chapter IV: 32-36

Picture Of Dorian Gray - Chapter IV: 32-36
Chapter IV: 32-36(...32) "I suppose you have heard the news, Basil?" said Lord Henryon the following evening, as Hallward was shown into a little privateroom at the Bristol where dinner had been laid for three."No, Harry," answered Hallward, giving his hat and coat to the bowingwaiter. "What is it? Nothing about politics, I hope? They don'tinterest me. There is hardly a single person in the House of Commonsworth painting; though many of them would be the better for a littlewhitewashing.""Dorian Gray is engaged to be married," said Lord Henry, watching himas he spoke.Hallward turned perfectly pale, and... Long Stories - Post by : dpd1998 - Date : June 2011 - Author : Oscar Wilde - Read : 1058

Picture Of Dorian Gray - Chapter III: 22-32 Picture Of Dorian Gray - Chapter III: 22-32

Picture Of Dorian Gray - Chapter III: 22-32
Chapter III: 22-32(...22) One afternoon, a month later, Dorian Gray was reclining in aluxurious arm-chair, in the little library of Lord Henry's house inCurzon Street. It was, in its way, a very charming room, with itshigh panelled wainscoting of olive-stained oak, its cream-coloredfrieze and ceiling of raised plaster-work, and its brick-dust feltcarpet strewn with long-fringed silk Persian rugs. On a tinysatinwood table stood a statuette by Clodion, and beside it lay acopy of "Les Cent Nouvelles," bound for Margaret of Valois by ClovisEve, and powdered with the gilt daisies that the queen had selectedfor her device. Some large... Long Stories - Post by : Softland - Date : June 2011 - Author : Oscar Wilde - Read : 1893

Picture Of Dorian Gray - Chapter II: 12-22 Picture Of Dorian Gray - Chapter II: 12-22

Picture Of Dorian Gray - Chapter II: 12-22
Chapter II: 12-22(...12) As they entered they saw Dorian Gray. He was seated at thepiano, with his back to them, turning over the pages of a volume ofSchumann's "Forest Scenes." "You must lend me these, Basil," hecried. "I want to learn them. They are perfectly charming.""That entirely depends on how you sit to-day, Dorian.""Oh, I am tired of sitting, and I don't want a life-sized portrait ofmyself," answered the lad, swinging round on the music-stool, in awilful, petulant manner. When he caught sight of Lord Henry, a faintblush colored his cheeks for a moment, and he... Long Stories - Post by : pendoc - Date : June 2011 - Author : Oscar Wilde - Read : 1024

Picture Of Dorian Gray - Chapter I: 3-12 Picture Of Dorian Gray - Chapter I: 3-12

Picture Of Dorian Gray - Chapter I: 3-12
Chapter I: 3-12(3) The studio was filled with the rich odor of roses, and when thelight summer wind stirred amidst the trees of the garden there camethrough the open door the heavy scent of the lilac, or the moredelicate perfume of the pink-flowering thorn.From the corner of the divan of Persian saddle-bags on which he waslying, smoking, as usual, innumerable cigarettes, Lord Henry Wottoncould just catch the gleam of the honey-sweet and honey-coloredblossoms of the laburnum, whose tremulous branches seemed hardly ableto bear the burden of a beauty so flame-like as theirs; and now andthen the fantastic shadows of birds in... Long Stories - Post by : ladyfaith - Date : June 2011 - Author : Oscar Wilde - Read : 3157

Lady Windermere's Fan - ACT IV Lady Windermere's Fan - ACT IV

Lady Windermere's Fan - ACT IV
ACT IVSCENE--Same as in Act I. LADY WINDERMERE. (Lying on sofa.) How can I tell him? I can'ttell him. It would kill me. I wonder what happened after Iescaped from that horrible room. Perhaps she told them the truereason of her being there, and the real meaning of that--fatal fanof mine. Oh, if he knows--how can I look him in the face again?He would never forgive me. (Touches bell.) How securely onethinks one lives--out of reach of temptation, sin, folly. And thensuddenly--Oh! Life is terrible. It rules us, we do... Plays - Post by : spiral - Date : June 2011 - Author : Oscar Wilde - Read : 3080

Lady Windermere's Fan - ACT III Lady Windermere's Fan - ACT III

Lady Windermere's Fan - ACT III
ACT IIISCENELord Darlington's Rooms. A large sofa is in front of fireplace R.At the back of the stage a curtain is drawn across the window.Doors L. and R. Table R. with writing materials. Table C. withsyphons, glasses, and Tantalus frame. Table L. with cigar andcigarette box. Lamps lit. LADY WINDERMERE. (Standing by the fireplace.) Why doesn't hecome? This waiting is horrible. He should be here. Why is he nothere, to wake by passionate words some fire within me? I am cold--cold as a loveless thing. Arthur must have read my... Plays - Post by : Supapro - Date : June 2011 - Author : Oscar Wilde - Read : 1002

Lady Windermere's Fan - ACT II Lady Windermere's Fan - ACT II

Lady Windermere's Fan - ACT II
ACT IISCENEDrawing-room in Lord Windermere's house. Door R.U. opening intoball-room band is playing. Door L. through which guests areentering. Door L.U. opens on to illuminated terrace. Palms,flowers, and brilliant lights. Room crowded with guests. LadyWindermere is receiving them. DUCHESS OF BERWICK. (Up C.) So strange Lord Windermere isn'there. Mr. Hopper is very late, too. You have kept those fivedances for him, Agatha? (Comes down.)LADY AGATHA. Yes, mamma.DUCHESS OF BERWICK. (Sitting on sofa.) Just let me see your card.I'm so glad LADY WINDERMERE has revived cards.--They're a mother'sonly... Plays - Post by : intprom - Date : June 2011 - Author : Oscar Wilde - Read : 953

Lady Windermere's Fan - ACT I Lady Windermere's Fan - ACT I

Lady Windermere's Fan - ACT I
ACT ISCENEMorning-room of Lord Windermere's house in Carlton House Terrace.Doors C. and R. Bureau with books and papers R. Sofa with smalltea-table L. Window opening on to terrace L. Table R. (LADY WINDERMERE is at table R., arranging roses in a blue bowl.)(Enter PARKER.)PARKER. Is your ladyship at home this afternoon?LADY WINDERMERE. Yes--who has called?PARKER. Lord Darlington, my lady.LADY WINDERMERE. (Hesitates for a moment.) Show him up--and I'mat home to any one who calls.PARKER. Yes, my lady.(Exit C.)LADY WINDERMERE. It's best for me to see him before to-night. I'mglad he's... Plays - Post by : Kellygirl13 - Date : June 2011 - Author : Oscar Wilde - Read : 1865

Lady Windermere's Fan - THE PERSONS OF THE PLAY Lady Windermere's Fan - THE PERSONS OF THE PLAY

Lady Windermere's Fan - THE PERSONS OF THE PLAY
THE PERSONS OF THE PLAY Lord WindermereLord DarlingtonLord Augustus LortonMr. DumbyMr. Cecil GrahamMr. HopperParker, ButlerLady WindermereThe Duchess of BerwickLady Agatha CarlisleLady PlymdaleLady StutfieldLady JedburghMrs. Cowper-CowperMrs. ErlynneRosalie, MaidTHE SCENES OF THE PLAYACT I. Morning-room in Lord Windermere's house.ACT II. Drawing-room in Lord Windermere's house.ACT III. Lord Darlington's rooms.ACT IV. Same as Act I.TIME: The PresentPLACE: London.The action of the play takes place within twenty-four hours,beginning on a Tuesday afternoon at five o'clock, and ending thenext day at 1.30 p.m.LONDON: ST. JAMES'S THEATRELessee and Manager:... Plays - Post by : Larry_Duncan - Date : June 2011 - Author : Oscar Wilde - Read : 1098

The Duchess Of Padua - ACT V The Duchess Of Padua - ACT V

The Duchess Of Padua - ACT V
ACT VSCENEA dungeon in the public prison of Padua; Guido lies asleep on apallet (L.C.); a table with a goblet on it is set (L.C.); fivesoldiers are drinking and playing dice in the corner on a stonetable; one of them has a lantern hung to his halbert; a torch isset in the wall over Guido's head. Two grated windows behind, oneon each side of the door which is (C.), look out into the passage;the stage is rather dark.FIRST SOLDIER(throws dice)Sixes again! good Pietro.SECOND SOLDIERI' faith, lieutenant, I will play with thee no more. I will loseeverything.THIRD SOLDIERExcept thy wits;... Plays - Post by : rsbombard - Date : June 2011 - Author : Oscar Wilde - Read : 2806