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The Art Of War - Seventh Book The Art Of War - Seventh Book

The Art Of War - Seventh Book
Seventh Book(Sidenote: Tounes and Fortresses maie be strong twoo waies; The place that now a daies is moste sought to fortifie in; How a Toune walle ought to bee made; The walle of a toune ought to bee high, and the diche within, and not without; The thickenes that a Toune walle ought to bee of, and the distaunces betwene everie flancker, and of what breadth and deapth the dich ought to bee; How the ordinaunce is planted, for the defence of a toune; The nature of the batterie.)You oughte to knowe, how that tounes and fortresses, maie bee strong either... Nonfictions - Post by : doitpower - Date : March 2012 - Author : Niccolo Machiavelli - Read : 1171

The Art Of War - Sixth Book The Art Of War - Sixth Book

The Art Of War - Sixth Book
Sixth BookZANOBI. I beleve that it is good, seyng the reasonyng must be chaunged, that Baptiste take his office, and I to resigne myne, and wee shall come in this case, to imitate the good Capitaines (accordyng as I have nowe here understoode of the gentilman) who place the beste souldiours, before and behinde the armie, semyng unto theim necessarie to have before, soche as maie lustely beginne the faight, and soche as behinde maie lustely sustaine it. Now seyng Cosimus began this reasonyng prudently, Baptiste prudently shall ende it. As for Luigi and I, have in this middeste intertained it,... Nonfictions - Post by : webforce - Date : March 2012 - Author : Niccolo Machiavelli - Read : 1133

The Art Of War - Fifth Book The Art Of War - Fifth Book

The Art Of War - Fifth Book
Fifth Book(Sidenote: How the Romaines marched with their armies; How the Romaines ordered their armie when it happened to be assaulted on the waie; How the main battailes ought to marche; The orderyng of an armie after soche sorte, that it maie marche safelie through the enemies countrie and be alwaies in a redines to faight; The place in the armie wher the bowmen and Harkabutters are appoincted; The place in the armie wher thextraordinarie Pikes are appoincted. The place in the armie wherthe generall capitain must be; Where the artillerie must be placed. The light horsmenne must be sente before... Nonfictions - Post by : Glen_Graham - Date : March 2012 - Author : Niccolo Machiavelli - Read : 1761

The Art Of War - Fourth Book The Art Of War - Fourth Book

The Art Of War - Fourth Book
Fourth BookLUIGI. Seng that under my governement, a field hath been wonne so honourably, I suppose that it is good, that I tempt not fortune any more, knowyng how variable, and unstable she is: and therefore, I desire to give up my governement, and that Zanobi do execute now this office of demaundyng, mindyng to followe the order, whiche concerneth the youngeste: and I knowe he will not refuse this honoure, or as we would saie, this labour, as well for to doe me pleasure, as also for beyng naturally of more stomach than I: nor it shall not make hym... Nonfictions - Post by : kwellman - Date : March 2012 - Author : Niccolo Machiavelli - Read : 2482

The Art Of War - Third Book The Art Of War - Third Book

The Art Of War - Third Book
Third BookCOSIMO. Seeing that we chaunge reasonyng, I will that the demaunder be chaunged: bicause I would not be thought presumptuous, the which I have alwaies blamed in other: therfore, I resigne the Dictatorship, and give this aucthoritie to hym that will have it, of these my other frendes.ZANOBI. We would be moste glad, that you should procede, but seyng that you will not, yet tell at leaste, whiche of us shall succede in your place.COSIMO. I will give this charge to signor Fabricio.FABRICIO. I am content to take it, and I will that we folowe the Venecian custome, that is,... Nonfictions - Post by : robrudd - Date : March 2012 - Author : Niccolo Machiavelli - Read : 2287

The Art Of War - Second Book The Art Of War - Second Book

The Art Of War - Second Book
Second Book(Sidenote: Howe the Romaines armed their souldiers and what weapons thei used.)I beleeve that it is necessarye, men being founde, to arme them, and minding to doo this, I suppose that it is a needefull thing to examine, what armoure the antiquitie used, and of the same to chose the best. The Romanes devided their foote men in heavie and lighte armed: Those that were light armed, they called by the name of Veliti: Under this name were understoode all those that threwe with Slinges, shot with Crossebowes, cast Dartes, and they used the most parte of them for their... Nonfictions - Post by : lewraw - Date : March 2012 - Author : Niccolo Machiavelli - Read : 2635

The Art Of War - First Book The Art Of War - First Book

The Art Of War - First Book
First BookForasmuch as I beleve that after death, al men maie be praised without charge, al occasion and suspecte of flatterie beyng taken awaie, I shal not doubte to praise our Cosimo Ruchellay, whose name was never remembred of me without teares, havyng knowen in him those condicions, the whiche in a good frende or in a citezien, might of his freendes, or of his countrie, be desired: for that I doe not knowe what thyng was so muche his, not excepting any thing (saving his soule) which for his frendes willingly of him should not have been spent: I knowe... Nonfictions - Post by : David_Eck - Date : March 2012 - Author : Niccolo Machiavelli - Read : 3260

The Art Of War - Preface The Art Of War - Preface

The Art Of War - Preface
PrefaceTHE ARTE OF WARWRITTEN FIRST IN ITALIAN BY NICHOLAS MACHIAVELLAND SET FORTHE IN ENGLISHE BY PETER WHITEHORNESTUDIENT AT GRAIES INNEWITH AN ADDICION OF OTHER LIKE MARCIALLE FEATES AND EXPERIMENTES1560Menfss. Iulij.TO THE MOSTE HIGHE, AND EXCELLENT PRINCES,ELIZABETH, by the Grace of God, Queneof Englande, Fraunce, and Irelande,defender of the faithe, and of the Churcheof Englande, and Irelande, on yearthnext under God, the supreme Governour.Although commonlie every man, moste worthie and renoumed Soveraine, seketh specially to commend and extolle the thing unto he feleth hymself naturally bent and inclined, yet al soche parciallitie and private affection laid aside, it is to bee thought... Nonfictions - Post by : smbr03299 - Date : March 2012 - Author : Niccolo Machiavelli - Read : 2024

The Art Of War - Introduction The Art Of War - Introduction

The Art Of War - Introduction
Introduction(Sidenote: The Life of a Day.)'I am at my farm; and, since my last misfortunes, have not been in Florence twenty days. I spent September in snaring thrushes; but at the end of the month, even this rather tiresome sport failed me. I rise with the sun, and go into a wood of mine that is being cut I remain two hours inspecting the work of the previous day and conversing with the woodcutters, who have always some trouble on hand amongst themselves or with their neighbours. When I leave the wood, I go to a spring, and thence to... Nonfictions - Post by : robert77 - Date : March 2012 - Author : Niccolo Machiavelli - Read : 633

Discourses On The First Decade Of Titus Livius - BOOK III - Chapter XLIX Discourses On The First Decade Of Titus Livius - BOOK III - Chapter XLIX

Discourses On The First Decade Of Titus Livius - BOOK III - Chapter XLIX
BOOK III - CHAPTER XLIXCHAPTER XLIX - That a Commonwealth to preserve its Freedom has constant need of new Ordinances. Of the services in respect of which Quintius Fabius received the surname of Maximus.It must happen, as I have already said, in every great city, that disorders needing the care of the physician continually spring up; and the graver these disorders are, the greater will be the skill needed for their treatment. And if ever in any city, most assuredly in Rome, we see these disorders assume strange and unexpected shapes. As when it appeared that all the Roman wives had... Nonfictions - Post by : grahamlaurie - Date : March 2012 - Author : Niccolo Machiavelli - Read : 2431

Discourses On The First Decade Of Titus Livius - BOOK III - Chapter XLVIII Discourses On The First Decade Of Titus Livius - BOOK III - Chapter XLVIII

Discourses On The First Decade Of Titus Livius - BOOK III - Chapter XLVIII
BOOK III - CHAPTER XLVIIICHAPTER XLVIII - That on finding an Enemy make what seems a grave blunder, we should suspect some fraud to lurk behind.The consul having gone to Rome to perform certain ceremonial rites, and Fulvius being left in charge of the Roman army in Etruria, the Etruscans, to see whether they could not circumvent the new commander, planting an ambush not far from the Roman camp, sent forward soldiers disguised as shepherds driving large flocks of sheep so as to pass in sight of the Roman army. These pretended shepherds coming close to the wall of his camp,... Nonfictions - Post by : abundance4usall - Date : March 2012 - Author : Niccolo Machiavelli - Read : 2643

Discourses On The First Decade Of Titus Livius - BOOK III - Chapter XLVII Discourses On The First Decade Of Titus Livius - BOOK III - Chapter XLVII

Discourses On The First Decade Of Titus Livius - BOOK III - Chapter XLVII
BOOK III - CHAPTER XLVIICHAPTER XLVII - That love of his Country should lead a good Citizen to forget private Wrongs.While commanding as consul against the Samnites, Manlius was wounded in a skirmish. His army being thereby endangered, the senate judged it expedient to send Papirius Cursor as dictator to supply his place. But as it was necessary that the dictator should be nominated by Fabius, the other consul, who was with the army in Etruria, and as a doubt was felt that he might refuse to nominate Papirius, who was his enemy, the senate sent two messengers to entreat him... Nonfictions - Post by : gmcarr1 - Date : March 2012 - Author : Niccolo Machiavelli - Read : 1132

Discourses On The First Decade Of Titus Livius - BOOK III - Chapter XLVI Discourses On The First Decade Of Titus Livius - BOOK III - Chapter XLVI

Discourses On The First Decade Of Titus Livius - BOOK III - Chapter XLVI
BOOK III - CHAPTER XLVICHAPTER XLVI - How the Characteristics of Families come to be perpetuated.Manners and institutions differing in different cities, seem here to produce a harder and there a softer race; and a like difference may also be discerned in the character of different families in the same city. And while this holds good of all cities, we have many instances of it in reading the history of Rome. For we find the Manlii always stern and stubborn; the Valerii kindly and courteous; the Claudii haughty and ambitious; and many families besides similarly distinguished from one another by their... Nonfictions - Post by : searson - Date : March 2012 - Author : Niccolo Machiavelli - Read : 555

Discourses On The First Decade Of Titus Livius - BOOK III - Chapter XLV Discourses On The First Decade Of Titus Livius - BOOK III - Chapter XLV

Discourses On The First Decade Of Titus Livius - BOOK III - Chapter XLV
BOOK III - CHAPTER XLVCHAPTER XLV - Whether in battle it is better to await and repel the Enemy's attack, or to anticipate it by an impetuous onset.Decius and Fabius, the Roman consuls, were each of them in command of a separate army, one directed against the Samnites, the other against the Etruscans: and as both delivered battle, we have to pronounce, in respect of the two engagements, which commander followed the better method. Decius attacked his enemy at once with the utmost fury and with his whole strength. Fabius was content, at first, merely to maintain his ground; for judging... Nonfictions - Post by : alfathomas30 - Date : March 2012 - Author : Niccolo Machiavelli - Read : 2582

Discourses On The First Decade Of Titus Livius - BOOK III - Chapter XLIV Discourses On The First Decade Of Titus Livius - BOOK III - Chapter XLIV

Discourses On The First Decade Of Titus Livius - BOOK III - Chapter XLIV
BOOK III - CHAPTER XLIVCHAPTER XLIV - That where ordinary methods fail, Hardihood and Daring often succeed.When attacked by the Romans, the Samnites as they could not without help stand against them in the field, resolved to leave garrisons in the towns of Samnium, and to pass with their main army into Etruria, that country being then at truce with Rome, and thus ascertain whether their actual presence in arms might not move the Etruscans to renew hostilities against Rome, which they had refused to renew when invited through envoys. During the negotiations which, on this occasion, passed between the two... Nonfictions - Post by : Tony_Wigley - Date : March 2012 - Author : Niccolo Machiavelli - Read : 1925

Discourses On The First Decade Of Titus Livius - BOOK III - Chapter XLIII Discourses On The First Decade Of Titus Livius - BOOK III - Chapter XLIII

Discourses On The First Decade Of Titus Livius - BOOK III - Chapter XLIII
BOOK III - CHAPTER XLIIICHAPTER XLIII - That Men born in the same Province retain through all Times nearly the same Character.The wise are wont to say, and not without reason or at random, that he who would forecast what is about to happen should look to what has been; since all human events, whether present or to come, have their exact counterpart in the past. And this, because these events are brought about by men, whose passions and dispositions remaining in all ages the same naturally give rise to the same effects; although, doubtless, the operation of these causes takes... Nonfictions - Post by : wigbrs - Date : March 2012 - Author : Niccolo Machiavelli - Read : 1491

Discourses On The First Decade Of Titus Livius - BOOK III - Chapter XLII Discourses On The First Decade Of Titus Livius - BOOK III - Chapter XLII

Discourses On The First Decade Of Titus Livius - BOOK III - Chapter XLII
BOOK III - CHAPTER XLIICHAPTER XLII - That Promises made on Compulsion are not to be observed.When, after being subjected to this disgrace, the consuls returned to Rome with their disarmed legions, Spurius Posthumius, himself one of the consuls, was the first to contend in the senate that the terms made in the Caudine Valley were not to be observed. For he argued that the Roman people were not bound by them, though he himself doubtless was, together with all the others who had promised peace; wherefore, if the people desired to set themselves free from every engagement, he and all... Nonfictions - Post by : erikedin - Date : March 2012 - Author : Niccolo Machiavelli - Read : 1283

Discourses On The First Decade Of Titus Livius - BOOK III - Chapter XLI Discourses On The First Decade Of Titus Livius - BOOK III - Chapter XLI

Discourses On The First Decade Of Titus Livius - BOOK III - Chapter XLI
BOOK III - CHAPTER XLICHAPTER XLI - That our Country is to be defended by Honour or by Dishonour; and in either way is well defended.The consuls together with the whole Roman army fell, as I have related, into the hands of the Samnites, who imposed on them the most ignominious terms, insisting that they should be stripped of their arms, and pass under the yoke before they were allowed to return to Rome. The consuls being astounded by the harshness of these conditions and the whole army overwhelmed with dismay, Lucius Lentulus, the Roman lieutenant, stood forward and said, that... Nonfictions - Post by : marmottan - Date : March 2012 - Author : Niccolo Machiavelli - Read : 2836

Discourses On The First Decade Of Titus Livius - BOOK III - Chapter XL Discourses On The First Decade Of Titus Livius - BOOK III - Chapter XL

Discourses On The First Decade Of Titus Livius - BOOK III - Chapter XL
BOOK III - CHAPTER XLCHAPTER XL - That Fraud is fair in War.Although in all other affairs it be hateful to use fraud, in the operations of war it is praiseworthy and glorious; so that he who gets the better of his enemy by fraud, is as much extolled as he who prevails by force. This appears in the judgments passed by such as have written of the lives of great warriors, who praise Hannibal and those other captains who have been most noted for acting in this way. But since we may read of many instances of such frauds, I... Nonfictions - Post by : vall74 - Date : March 2012 - Author : Niccolo Machiavelli - Read : 3151

Discourses On The First Decade Of Titus Livius - BOOK III - Chapter XXXIX Discourses On The First Decade Of Titus Livius - BOOK III - Chapter XXXIX

Discourses On The First Decade Of Titus Livius - BOOK III - Chapter XXXIX
BOOK III - CHAPTER XXXIXCHAPTER XXXIX - That a Captain should have good knowledge of Places.Among other qualifications essential in a good captain is a knowledge, both general and particular, of places and countries, for without such knowledge it is impossible for him to carry out any enterprise in the best way. And while practice is needed for perfection in every art, in this it is needed in the highest degree. Such practice, or particular knowledge as it may be termed, is sooner acquired in the chase than in any other exercise; and, accordingly, we find it said by ancient historians... Nonfictions - Post by : Reseller_Center - Date : March 2012 - Author : Niccolo Machiavelli - Read : 2031