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Passages From The English Notebooks - Volume II - London. Passages From The English Notebooks - Volume II - London.

Passages From The English Notebooks - Volume II - London.
24 Great Russell Street, November 10th.--We have been thinking and negotiating about taking lodgings in London lately, and this morning we left Leamington and reached London with no other misadventure than that of leaving the great bulk of our luggage behind us,--the van which we hired to take it to the railway station having broken down under its prodigious weight, in the middle of the street. On our journey we saw nothing particularly worthy of note,--but everywhere the immortal verdure of England, scarcely less perfect than in June, so far as the fields are concerned, though the foliage of the trees... Nonfictions - Post by : Kingly5 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Nathaniel Hawthorne - Read : 2542

Passages From The English Notebooks - Volume II - Leamington_ Passages From The English Notebooks - Volume II - Leamington_

Passages From The English Notebooks - Volume II - Leamington_
Lansdowne Circus, October 10th.--I returned hither from Liverpool last week, and have spent the time idly since then, reposing myself after the four years of unnatural restraint in the Consulate. Being already pretty well acquainted with the neighborhood of Leamington, I have little or nothing to record about the prettiest, cheerfullest, cleanest of English towns.On Saturday we took the rail for Coventry, about a half-hour's travel distant. I had been there before, more than two years ago. . . . No doubt I described it on my first visit; and it is not remarkable enough to be worth two descriptions,--a large... Nonfictions - Post by : Pam_Sharp - Date : May 2012 - Author : Nathaniel Hawthorne - Read : 2773

Passages From The English Notebooks - Volume II - Liverpool__ Passages From The English Notebooks - Volume II - Liverpool__

Passages From The English Notebooks - Volume II - Liverpool__
September 17th.--I took the train for Rugby, and thence to Liverpool. The most noticeable character at Mrs. Blodgett's now is Mr. T------, a Yankee, who has seen the world, and gathered much information and experience already, though still a young man,--a handsome man, with black curly hair, a dark, intelligent, bright face, and rather cold blue eyes, but a very pleasant air and address. His observing faculties are very strongly developed in his forehead, and his reflective ones seem to be adequate to making some, if not the deepest, use of what he sees. He has voyaged and travelled almost all... Nonfictions - Post by : joshua666 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Nathaniel Hawthorne - Read : 3043

Passages From The English Notebooks - Volume II - Kenilworth Passages From The English Notebooks - Volume II - Kenilworth

Passages From The English Notebooks - Volume II - Kenilworth
September 13th.--The weather was very uncertain through the last week, and yesterday morning, too, was misty and sunless; notwithstanding which we took the rail for Kenilworth before eleven. The distance from Leamington is less than five miles, and at the Kenilworth station we found a little bit of an omnibus, into which we packed ourselves, together with two ladies, one of whom, at least, was an American. I begin to agree partly with the English, that we are not a people of elegant manners. At all events there is sometimes a bare, hard, meagre sort of deportment, especially in our women,... Nonfictions - Post by : tderey - Date : May 2012 - Author : Nathaniel Hawthorne - Read : 2216

Passages From The English Notebooks - Volume II - Leamington Passages From The English Notebooks - Volume II - Leamington

Passages From The English Notebooks - Volume II - Leamington
Lansdowne Cirrus, September 10th.--We have become quite weary of our small, mean, uncomfortable, and unbeautiful lodgings at Chorlton Road, with poor and scanty furniture within doors, and no better prospect from the parlor windows than a mud-puddle, larger than most English lakes, on a vacant building-lot opposite our house. The Exhibition, too, was fast becoming a bore; for you must really love a picture, in order to tolerate the sight of it many times. Moreover, the smoky and sooty air of that abominable Manchester affected my wife's throat disadvantageously; so, on a Tuesday morning, we struck our tent and set forth... Nonfictions - Post by : ramon3309 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Nathaniel Hawthorne - Read : 1592

Passages From The French And Italian Notebooks - Volume 2 - LONDON Passages From The French And Italian Notebooks - Volume 2 - LONDON

Passages From The French And Italian Notebooks - Volume 2 - LONDON
31 Hertford Street, Mayfair, May 16th, 1860.--I came hither from Bath on the 14th, and am staying with my friends, Mr. and Mrs. Motley. I would gladly journalize some of my proceedings, and describe things and people; but I find the same coldness and stiffness in my pen as always since our return to England. I dined with the Motleys at Lord Dufferin's, on Monday evening, and there met, among a few other notable people, the Honorable Mrs. Norton, a dark, comely woman, who doubtless was once most charming, and still has charms, at above fifty years of age. In fact,... Nonfictions - Post by : BMInvest - Date : April 2012 - Author : Nathaniel Hawthorne - Read : 2544

Passages From The French And Italian Notebooks - Volume 2 - ENGLAND Passages From The French And Italian Notebooks - Volume 2 - ENGLAND

Passages From The French And Italian Notebooks - Volume 2 - ENGLAND
Leamington, November 14th, 1859.--J---- and I walked to Lillington the other day. Its little church was undergoing renovation when we were here two years ago, and now seems to be quite renewed, with the exception of its square, gray, battlemented tower, which has still the aspect of unadulterated antiquity. On Saturday J----- and I walked to Warwick by the old road, passing over the bridge of the Avon, within view of the castle. It is as fine a piece of English scenery as exists anywhere,-- the quiet little river, shadowed with drooping trees, and, in its vista, the gray towers and... Nonfictions - Post by : jakyroodu - Date : April 2012 - Author : Nathaniel Hawthorne - Read : 1565

Passages From The French And Italian Notebooks - Volume 2 - HAVRE Passages From The French And Italian Notebooks - Volume 2 - HAVRE

Passages From The French And Italian Notebooks - Volume 2 - HAVRE
Hotel Wheeler, June 22d.--We arrived at this hotel last evening from Paris, and find ourselves on the borders of the Petit Quay Notre Dame, with steamers and boats right under our windows, and all sorts of dock-business going on briskly. There are barrels, bales, and crates of goods; there are old iron cannon for posts; in short, all that belongs to the Wapping of a great seaport. . . . The American partialities of the guests (of this hotel) are consulted by the decorations of the parlor, in which hang two lithographs and colored views of New York, from Brooklyn and... Nonfictions - Post by : CLTaylor - Date : April 2012 - Author : Nathaniel Hawthorne - Read : 2769

Passages From The French And Italian Notebooks - Volume 2 - VILLENEUVE Passages From The French And Italian Notebooks - Volume 2 - VILLENEUVE

Passages From The French And Italian Notebooks - Volume 2 - VILLENEUVE
Hotel de Byron, June 12th.--Yesterday afternoon we left Geneva by a steamer, starting from the quay at only a short distance from our hotel. The forenoon had been showery; but the suit now came out very pleasantly, although there were still clouds and mist enough to give infinite variety to the mountain scenery. At the commencement of our voyage the scenery of the lake was not incomparably superior to that of other lakes on which I have sailed, as Lake Windermere, for instance, or Loch Lomond, or our own Lake Champlain. It certainly grew more grand and beautiful, however, till at... Nonfictions - Post by : oxley - Date : April 2012 - Author : Nathaniel Hawthorne - Read : 2423

Passages From The French And Italian Notebooks - Volume 2 - GENEVA Passages From The French And Italian Notebooks - Volume 2 - GENEVA

Passages From The French And Italian Notebooks - Volume 2 - GENEVA
Hotel d'Angleterre, June 11th.--We left Avignon on Tuesday, 7th, and took the rail to Valence we arrived between four and five, and put up at the Hotel de la Poste, an ancient house, with dirty floors and dirt generally, but otherwise comfortable enough. . . . Valence is a stately old town, full of tall houses and irregular streets. We found a cathedral there, not very large, but with a high and venerable interior, a nave supported by tall pillars, from the height of which spring arches. This loftiness is characteristic of French churches, as distinguished from those of Italy.... Nonfictions - Post by : Alexei - Date : April 2012 - Author : Nathaniel Hawthorne - Read : 2539

Passages From The French And Italian Notebooks - Volume 2 - AVIGNON Passages From The French And Italian Notebooks - Volume 2 - AVIGNON

Passages From The French And Italian Notebooks - Volume 2 - AVIGNON
Hotel de l'Europe, June 1st.--I remember nothing very special to record about Marseilles; though it was really like passing from death into life, to find ourselves in busy, cheerful, effervescing France, after living so long between asleep and awake in sluggish Italy. Marseilles is a very interesting and entertaining town, with its bold surrounding heights, its wide streets,--so they seemed to us after the Roman alleys,--its squares, shady with trees, its diversified population of sailors, citizens, Orientals, and what not; but I have no spirit for description any longer; being tired of seeing things, and still more of telling myself about... Nonfictions - Post by : KrazyFree - Date : April 2012 - Author : Nathaniel Hawthorne - Read : 996

Passages From The French And Italian Notebooks - Volume 2 - FRANCE Passages From The French And Italian Notebooks - Volume 2 - FRANCE

Passages From The French And Italian Notebooks - Volume 2 - FRANCE
Hotel des Colonies, Marseilles, May 29th, Saturday.--Wednesday was the day fixed for our departure from Rome, and after breakfast I walked to the Pincian, and saw the garden and the city, and the Borghese grounds, and St. Peter's in an earlier sunlight than ever before. Methought they never looked so beautiful, nor the sky so bright and blue. I saw Soracte on the horizon, and I looked at everything as if for the last time; nor do I wish ever to see any of these objects again, though no place ever took so strong a hold of my being as Rome,... Nonfictions - Post by : cash5000 - Date : April 2012 - Author : Nathaniel Hawthorne - Read : 2884

Passages From The French And Italian Notebooks - Volume 2 - ROME Passages From The French And Italian Notebooks - Volume 2 - ROME

Passages From The French And Italian Notebooks - Volume 2 - ROME
68 Piazza Poli, October 17th.--We left Viterbo on the 15th, and proceeded, through Monterosi, to Sette Verse. There was nothing interesting at Sette Verse, except an old Roman bridge, of a single arch, which had kept its sweep, composed of one row of stones, unbroken for two or more thousand years, and looked just as strong as ever, though gray with age, and fringed with plants that found it hard to fix themselves in its close crevices.The next day we drove along the Cassian Way towards Rome. It was a most delightful morning, a genial atmosphere; the more so, I suppose,... Nonfictions - Post by : eyalhalimi - Date : April 2012 - Author : Nathaniel Hawthorne - Read : 2801

Passages From The French And Italian Notebooks - Volume 2 - SETTE VENE Passages From The French And Italian Notebooks - Volume 2 - SETTE VENE

Passages From The French And Italian Notebooks - Volume 2 - SETTE VENE
October 15th.--We left Radicofani long before sunrise, and I saw that ceremony take place from the coupe of the vettura for the first time in a long while. A sunset is the better sight of the two. I have always suspected it, and have been strengthened in the idea whenever I have had an opportunity of comparison. Our departure from Radicofani was most dreary, except that we were very glad to get away; but, the cold discomfort of dressing in a chill bedroom by candlelight, and our uncertain wandering through the immense hotel with a dim taper in search of the... Nonfictions - Post by : kristyc - Date : April 2012 - Author : Nathaniel Hawthorne - Read : 633

Passages From The French And Italian Notebooks - Volume 2 - VITERBO Passages From The French And Italian Notebooks - Volume 2 - VITERBO

Passages From The French And Italian Notebooks - Volume 2 - VITERBO
The Black Eagle, October 14th.--Perhaps I had something more to say of San Quirico, but I shall merely add that there is a stately old palace of the Piccolomini close to the church above described. It is built in the style of the Roman palaces, and looked almost large enough to be one of them. Nevertheless, the basement story, or part of it, seems to be used as a barn and stable, for I saw a yoke of oxen in the entrance. I cannot but mention a most wretched team of vettura-horses which stopped at the door of our albergo: poor,... Nonfictions - Post by : vonathon - Date : April 2012 - Author : Nathaniel Hawthorne - Read : 3398

Passages From The French And Italian Notebooks - Volume 2 - RADICOFANI Passages From The French And Italian Notebooks - Volume 2 - RADICOFANI

Passages From The French And Italian Notebooks - Volume 2 - RADICOFANI
October 13th.--We arranged to begin our journey at six. . . . It was a chill, lowering morning, and the rain blew a little in our faces before we had gone far, but did not continue long. The country soon lost the pleasant aspect which it wears immediately about Siena, and grew very barren and dreary. Then it changed again for the better, the road leading us through a fertility of vines and olives, after which the dreary and barren hills came back again, and formed our prospect throughout most of the day. We stopped for our dejeuner a la fourchette... Nonfictions - Post by : nethania - Date : April 2012 - Author : Nathaniel Hawthorne - Read : 3107

Passages From The French And Italian Notebooks - Volume 2 - SIENA Passages From The French And Italian Notebooks - Volume 2 - SIENA

Passages From The French And Italian Notebooks - Volume 2 - SIENA
October 2d.--Yesterday morning, at six o'clock, we left our ancient tower, and threw a parting glance--and a rather sad one--over the misty Val d' Arno. This summer will look like a happy one in our children's retrospect, and also, no doubt, in the years that remain to ourselves; and, in truth, I have found it a peaceful and not uncheerful one.It was not a pleasant morning, and Monte Morello, looking down on Florence, had on its cap, betokening foul weather, according to the proverb. Crossing the suspension-bridge, we reached the Leopoldo railway without entering the city. By some mistake,--or perhaps because... Nonfictions - Post by : mercuryalliance - Date : April 2012 - Author : Nathaniel Hawthorne - Read : 585

Passages From The French And Italian Notebooks - Volume 2 - VILLA MONTANTO. MONTE BENI Continued Passages From The French And Italian Notebooks - Volume 2 - VILLA MONTANTO. MONTE BENI Continued

Passages From The French And Italian Notebooks - Volume 2 - VILLA MONTANTO. MONTE BENI Continued
A great many other wonders took place within the knowledge and experience of Mrs. P------. She saw, not one pair of hands only, but many. The head of one of her dead children, a little boy, was laid in her lap, not in ghastly fashion, as a head out of the coffin and the grave, but just as the living child might have laid it on his mother's knees. It was invisible, by the by, and she recognized it by the features and the character of the hair, through the sense of touch. Little hands grasped hers. In short, these soberly... Nonfictions - Post by : varun - Date : April 2012 - Author : Nathaniel Hawthorne - Read : 1757

Passages From The French And Italian Notebooks - Volume 2 - VILLA MONTANTO. MONTE BENI Passages From The French And Italian Notebooks - Volume 2 - VILLA MONTANTO. MONTE BENI

Passages From The French And Italian Notebooks - Volume 2 - VILLA MONTANTO. MONTE BENI
August 2d.--We had grown weary of the heat of Florence within the walls, . . . . there being little opportunity for air and exercise except within the precincts of our little garden, which, also, we feared might breed malaria, or something akin to it. We have therefore taken this suburban villa for the two next months, and, yesterday morning, we all came out hither. J----- had preceded us with B. P------. The villa is on a hill called Bellosguardo, about a mile beyond the Porta Romana. Less than half an hour's walk brought us, who were on foot, to the... Nonfictions - Post by : outsourcing - Date : April 2012 - Author : Nathaniel Hawthorne - Read : 2138

Passages From The French And Italian Notebooks - Volume 2 - FLORENCE Continued 3 Passages From The French And Italian Notebooks - Volume 2 - FLORENCE Continued 3

Passages From The French And Italian Notebooks - Volume 2 - FLORENCE Continued 3
All the time we were in the church some great religious ceremony had been going forward; the organ playing and the white-robed priests bowing, gesticulating, and making Latin prayers at the high altar at least a hundred wax tapers were burning in constellations. Everybody knelt, except ourselves, yet seemed not to be troubled by the echoes of our passing footsteps, nor to require that we should pray along with them. They consider us already lost irrevocably, no doubt, and therefore right enough in taking no heed of their devotions; not but what we took so much heed, however, as to... Nonfictions - Post by : Barry13 - Date : April 2012 - Author : Nathaniel Hawthorne - Read : 3176