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The Letters Of Montaigne The Letters Of Montaigne

The Letters Of Montaigne
(Translated by Charles Cotton) I. To Monsieur de MONTAIGNE(This account of the death of La Boetie begins imperfectly. It first appeared in a little volume of Miscellanies in 1571. See Hazlitt, ubi sup. p. 630.)--As to his last words, doubtless, if any man can give good account of them, it is I, both because, during the whole of his sickness he conversed as fully with me as with any one, and also because, in consequence of the singular and brotherly friendship which we had entertained for each other, I was perfectly acquainted with the intentions, opinions, and... Essays - Post by : Riley_Crayton - Date : April 2011 - Author : Montaigne - Read : 2761

That Men By Various Ways Arrive At The Same End That Men By Various Ways Arrive At The Same End

That Men By Various Ways Arrive At The Same End
(Translated by Charles Cotton) The most usual way of appeasing the indignation of such as we have any way offended, when we see them in possession of the power of revenge, and find that we absolutely lie at their mercy, is by submission, to move them to commiseration and pity; and yet bravery, constancy, and resolution, however quite contrary means, have sometimes served to produce the same effect.--(Florio's version begins thus: "The most vsuall waie to appease those minds wee have offended, when revenge lies in their hands, and that we stand at their mercie, is by submission to move them... Essays - Post by : demenev - Date : April 2011 - Author : Montaigne - Read : 3626

Of Sorrow Of Sorrow

Of Sorrow
(Translated by Charles Cotton) No man living is more free from this passion than I, who yet neither like it in myself nor admire it in others, and yet generally the world, as a settled thing, is pleased to grace it with a particular esteem, clothing therewith wisdom, virtue, and conscience. Foolish and sordid guise! --("No man is more free from this passion than I, for I neither love nor regard it: albeit the world hath undertaken, as it were upon covenant, to grace it with a particular favour. Therewith they adorne age, vertue, and conscience. Oh foolish... Essays - Post by : jeffk - Date : April 2011 - Author : Montaigne - Read : 1660

That Our Affections Carry Themselves Beyond Us That Our Affections Carry Themselves Beyond Us

That Our Affections Carry Themselves Beyond Us
(Translated by Charles Cotton) Such as accuse mankind of the folly of gaping after future things, and advise us to make our benefit of those which are present, and to set up our rest upon them, as having no grasp upon that which is to come, even less than that which we have upon what is past, have hit upon the most universal of human errors, if that may be called an error to which nature herself has disposed us, in order to the continuation of her own work, prepossessing us, amongst several others, with this deceiving imagination, as being more... Essays - Post by : svisj - Date : April 2011 - Author : Montaigne - Read : 3410

That The Soul Expends Its Passions Upon False Objects, Where The True Are Wantin That The Soul Expends Its Passions Upon False Objects, Where The True Are Wantin

That The Soul Expends Its Passions Upon False Objects, Where The True Are Wantin
(Translated by Charles Cotton) A gentleman of my country, marvellously tormented with the gout, being importuned by his physicians totally to abstain from all manner of salt meats, was wont pleasantly to reply, that in the extremity of his fits he must needs have something to quarrel with, and that railing at and cursing, one while the Bologna sausages, and another the dried tongues and the hams, was some mitigation to his pain. But, in good earnest, as the arm when it is advanced to strike, if it miss the blow, and goes by the wind, it pains us; and... Essays - Post by : MarcusYong - Date : April 2011 - Author : Montaigne - Read : 2923

Whether The Governor Of A Place Besieged Ought Himself To Go Out To Parley Whether The Governor Of A Place Besieged Ought Himself To Go Out To Parley

Whether The Governor Of A Place Besieged Ought Himself To Go Out To Parley
(Translated by Charles Cotton) Quintus Marcius, the Roman legate in the war against Perseus, King of Macedon, to gain time wherein to reinforce his army, set on foot some overtures of accommodation, with which the king being lulled asleep, concluded a truce for some days, by this means giving his enemy opportunity and leisure to recruit his forces, which was afterwards the occasion of the king's final ruin. Yet the elder senators, mindful of their forefathers' manners, condemned this proceeding as degenerating from their ancient practice, which, they said, was to fight by valour, and not by artifice, surprises, and... Essays - Post by : vdorazio - Date : April 2011 - Author : Montaigne - Read : 831

That The Hour Of Parley Is Dangerous That The Hour Of Parley Is Dangerous

That The Hour Of Parley Is Dangerous
(Translated by Charles Cotton) I saw, notwithstanding, lately at Mussidan, a place not far from my house, that those who were driven out thence by our army, and others of their party, highly complained of treachery, for that during a treaty of accommodation, and in the very interim that their deputies were treating, they were surprised and cut to pieces: a thing that, peradventure, in another age, might have had some colour of foul play; but, as I have just said, the practice of arms in these days is quite another thing, and there is now no confidence in an enemy... Essays - Post by : Case_Stevens - Date : April 2011 - Author : Montaigne - Read : 1341

That The Intention Is Judge Of Our Actions That The Intention Is Judge Of Our Actions

That The Intention Is Judge Of Our Actions
(Translated by Charles Cotton)  'Tis a saying, "That death discharges us of all our obligations." I know some who have taken it in another sense. Henry VII., King of England, articled with Don Philip, son to Maximilian the emperor, or (to place him more honourably) father to the Emperor Charles V., that the said Philip should deliver up the Duke of Suffolk of the White Rose, his enemy, who was fled into the Low Countries, into his hands; which Philip accordingly did, but upon condition, nevertheless, that Henry should attempt nothing against the life of the said Duke; but... Essays - Post by : lawvest - Date : April 2011 - Author : Montaigne - Read : 1655

Of Idleness Of Idleness

Of Idleness
(Translated by Charles Cotton) As we see some grounds that have long lain idle and untilled, when grown rich and fertile by rest, to abound with and spend their virtue in the product of innumerable sorts of weeds and wild herbs that are unprofitable, and that to make them perform their true office, we are to cultivate and prepare them for such seeds as are proper for our service; and as we see women that, without knowledge of man, do sometimes of themselves bring forth inanimate and formless lumps of flesh, but that to cause a natural and perfect generation they... Essays - Post by : joelmon - Date : April 2011 - Author : Montaigne - Read : 1340

Of Liars Of Liars

Of Liars
(Translated by Charles Cotton) There is not a man living whom it would so little become to speak from memory as myself, for I have scarcely any at all, and do not think that the world has another so marvellously treacherous as mine. My other faculties are all sufficiently ordinary and mean; but in this I think myself very rare and singular, and deserving to be thought famous. Besides the natural inconvenience I suffer by it (for, certes, the necessary use of memory considered, Plato had reason when he called it a great and powerful goddess), in my country, when... Essays - Post by : laffe - Date : April 2011 - Author : Montaigne - Read : 1441

Of Quick Or Slow Speech Of Quick Or Slow Speech

Of Quick Or Slow Speech
(Translated by Charles Cotton) "Onc ne furent a touts toutes graces donnees." ("All graces were never yet given to any one man."--A verse in one of La Brebis' Sonnets.)So we see in the gift of eloquence in some have such a facility and promptness, and that which we call a present wit so easy, that they are ever ready upon all occasions, and never to be surprised; and others more heavy and slow, never venture to utter anything but what they have long premeditated, and taken great care and pains to fit and prepare. Now, as we... Essays - Post by : Pennejac - Date : April 2011 - Author : Montaigne - Read : 2864

Of Prognostications Of Prognostications

Of Prognostications
(Translated by Charles Cotton) For what concerns oracles, it is certain that a good while before the coming of Jesus Christ they had begun to lose their credit; for we see that Cicero troubled to find out the cause of their decay, and he has these words: "Cur isto modo jam oracula Delphis non eduntur, non modo nostro aetate, sed jam diu; ut nihil possit esse contemptius?"("What is the reason that the... Essays - Post by : DrRich - Date : April 2011 - Author : Montaigne - Read : 2208

Of Constancy Of Constancy

Of Constancy
(Translated by Charles Cotton) The law of resolution and constancy does not imply that we ought not, as much as in us lies, to decline and secure ourselves from the mischiefs and inconveniences that threaten us; nor, consequently, that we shall not fear lest they should surprise us: on the contrary, all decent and honest ways and means of securing ourselves from harms, are not only permitted, but, moreover, commendable, and the business of constancy chiefly is, bravely to stand to, and stoutly to suffer those inconveniences which are not possibly to be avoided. So that there is no supple... Essays - Post by : pedro - Date : April 2011 - Author : Montaigne - Read : 3459

The Ceremony Of The Interview Of Princes The Ceremony Of The Interview Of Princes

The Ceremony Of The Interview Of Princes
(Translated by Charles Cotton) There is no subject so frivolous that does not merit a place in this rhapsody. According to our common rule of civility, it would be a notable affront to an equal, and much more to a superior, to fail being at home when he has given you notice he will come to visit you. Nay, Queen Margaret of Navarre--(Marguerite de Valois, authoress of the 'Heptameron')--further adds, that it would be a rudeness in a gentleman to go out, as we so often do, to meet any that is coming to see him, let him be... Essays - Post by : Tammy - Date : April 2011 - Author : Montaigne - Read : 2769

That Men Are Justly Punished For Being Obstinate In The Defence Of A Fort That Men Are Justly Punished For Being Obstinate In The Defence Of A Fort

That Men Are Justly Punished For Being Obstinate In The Defence Of A Fort
(Translated by Charles Cotton) THAT MEN ARE JUSTLY PUNISHED FOR BEING OBSTINATE IN THE DEFENCE OF A FORT THAT IS NOT IN REASON TO BE DEFENDED Valour has its bounds as well as other virtues, which, once transgressed, the next step is into the territories of vice; so that by having too large a proportion of this heroic virtue, unless a man be very perfect in its limits, which upon the confines are very hard to discern, he may very easily unawares run into temerity, obstinacy, and folly. From this consideration it is that we have derived the custom, in... Essays - Post by : Romerojr - Date : April 2011 - Author : Montaigne - Read : 3131

Of The Punishment Of Cowardice Of The Punishment Of Cowardice

Of The Punishment Of Cowardice
(Translated by Charles Cotton) I once heard of a prince, and a great captain, having a narration given him as he sat at table of the proceeding against Monsieur de Vervins, who was sentenced to death for having surrendered Boulogne to the English, --(To Henry VIII. in 1544)--openly maintaining that a soldier could not justly be put to death for want of courage. And, in truth, 'tis reason that a man should make a great difference betwixt faults that merely proceed from infirmity, and those that are visibly the effects of treachery and malice: for, in the last, we act... Essays - Post by : Brandy - Date : April 2011 - Author : Montaigne - Read : 2894

A Proceeding Of Some Ambassadors A Proceeding Of Some Ambassadors

A Proceeding Of Some Ambassadors
(Translated by Charles Cotton) I observe in my travels this custom, ever to learn something from the information of those with whom I confer (which is the best school of all others), and to put my company upon those subjects they are the best able to speak of:-- "Basti al nocchiero ragionar de' venti,Al bifolco dei tori; et le sue piagheConti'l guerrier; conti'l pastor gli armenti." ("Let the sailor content himself with talking of the winds; the cowherd of his oxen; the soldier of his wounds; the shepherd of his flocks."--An Italian translation of Propertius, ii. i, 43) For it often... Essays - Post by : Paperboy - Date : April 2011 - Author : Montaigne - Read : 3606

Of Fear Of Fear

Of Fear
(Translated by Charles Cotton) "Obstupui, steteruntque comae et vox faucibus haesit."("I was amazed, my hair stood on end, and my voice stuck in my throat." Virgil, AEneid, ii. 774.)I am not so good a naturalist (as they call it) as to discern by what secret springs fear has its motion in us; but, be this as it may, 'tis a strange passion, and such a one that the physicians say there is no other whatever that sooner dethrones our judgment from its proper seat; which is so true, that I myself have seen very many become... Essays - Post by : susan - Date : April 2011 - Author : Montaigne - Read : 3327

That Men Are Not To Judge Of Our Happiness Till After Death That Men Are Not To Judge Of Our Happiness Till After Death

That Men Are Not To Judge Of Our Happiness Till After Death
(Translated by Charles Cotton) (Charron has borrowed with unusual liberality from this and the succeeding chapter. See Nodier, Questions, p. 206.) "Scilicet ultima semperExspectanda dies homini est; dicique beatusAnte obitum nemo supremaque funera debet." ("We should all look forward to our last day: no one can be called happy till he is dead and buried."--Ovid, Met, iii. 135) The very children know the story of King Croesus to this purpose, who being taken prisoner by Cyrus, and by him condemned to die, as he was going to execution cried out, "O Solon, Solon!" which being presently reported... Essays - Post by : Valenti - Date : April 2011 - Author : Montaigne - Read : 1797

That To Study Philosophy Is To Learn To Die That To Study Philosophy Is To Learn To Die

That To Study Philosophy Is To Learn To Die
(Translated by Charles Cotton) Cicero says--(Tusc., i. 31.)--"that to study philosophy is nothing but to prepare one's self to die." The reason of which is, because study and contemplation do in some sort withdraw from us our soul, and employ it separately from the body, which is a kind of apprenticeship and a resemblance of death; or, else, because all the wisdom and reasoning in the world do in the end conclude in this point, to teach us not to fear to die. And to say the truth, either our reason mocks us, or it ought to have... Essays - Post by : jardo - Date : April 2011 - Author : Montaigne - Read : 3345