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The Shopkeeper Turned Gentleman - Act 5 The Shopkeeper Turned Gentleman - Act 5

The Shopkeeper Turned Gentleman - Act 5
ACT VSCENE I.--MRS. JOURDAIN, MR. JOURDAIN. MRS. JOUR. Goodness gracious me! Lord, have mercy on us! What can this be? What a figure! Is it a _momon (Footnote: Apparently there is no English equivalent to _momon in this sense.) you have in hand, and is this carnival time? Do speak! What does all this mean? Who trussed you up in this manner? MR. JOUR. Just see the impertinent woman, to speak after such a manner to a _mamamouchi_. MRS. JOUR. What do you say? MR. JOUR. Yes, you must show me respect now; I have just been made a _mamamouchi_. MRS.... Plays - Post by : emb582 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Moliere - Read : 3339

The Shopkeeper Turned Gentleman - Act 1 The Shopkeeper Turned Gentleman - Act 1

The Shopkeeper Turned Gentleman - Act 1
ACT IThe overture is played by a great many instruments; and in the middle of the stage the PUPIL of the MUSIC MASTER is seated at a table composing a serenade which MR. JOURDAIN has asked for. SCENE I.--MUSIC MASTER, DANCING MASTER, THREE SINGERS, TWO VIOLIN PLAYERS, FOUR DANCERS. MUS. MAS. (_to the MUSICIANS). Come into this room, and rest till he comes. DAN. MAS. (_to the DANCERS). Come also, on this side. MUS. MAS. (_to his PUPIL). Have you finished? PUP. Yes. MUS. MAS. Let me see. Very good. DAN. MAS. Is it anything new? MUS. MAS. Yes; it is... Plays - Post by : emb582 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Moliere - Read : 2496

The Shopkeeper Turned Gentleman - Persons Represented The Shopkeeper Turned Gentleman - Persons Represented

The Shopkeeper Turned Gentleman - Persons Represented
THE SHOPKEEPER TURNED GENTLEMAN. (LE BOURGEOIS GENTILHOMME.) BY MOLIERE, TRANSLATED INTO ENGLISH PROSE. WITH SHORT INTRODUCTIONS AND EXPLANATORY NOTES. BY CHARLES HERON WALL. 'Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme' was acted before the King for the first time at Chambord, on October 14, 1670, and on November 28 at the Palais Royal. After the second representation, Louis XIV. said to Moliere, "You have never written anything which amused me more, and your play is excellent." But it obtained a still greater success in Paris the _bourgeois willingly and good-humouredly laughed at what they deemed their neighbours' weaknesses. The three first acts are the... Plays - Post by : emb582 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Moliere - Read : 2709

Sganarelle; Or, The Self-deceived Husband - Act 1 Sganarelle; Or, The Self-deceived Husband - Act 1

Sganarelle; Or, The Self-deceived Husband - Act 1
ACT ISGANARELLE: OR THE SELF-DECEIVED HUSBAND, (_SGANARELLE: OU LE COCU IMAGINAIRE_.) SCENE I.--GORGIBUS, CELIA, CELIA'S MAID. CEL. (_Coming out in tears, her father following her_). Ah! never expect my heart to consent to that. GORG. What do you mutter, you little impertinent girl? Do you suppose you can thwart my resolution? Have I not absolute power over you? And shall your youthful brain control my fatherly discretion by foolish arguments? Which of us two has most right to command the other? Which of us two, you or I, is, in your opinion, best able to judge what is advantageous for you?... Plays - Post by : emb582 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Moliere - Read : 2752

Sganarelle; Or, The Self-deceived Husband - Dramatis Personae Sganarelle; Or, The Self-deceived Husband - Dramatis Personae

Sganarelle; Or, The Self-deceived Husband - Dramatis Personae
GORGIBUS, _a citizen of Paris_. LELIO, _in love with Celia_. SGANARELLE, _a citizen of Paris and the self-deceived husband_. (Footnote: Moliere acted this part himself. In the inventory of his dresses taken after his death, and given by M. Eudore Soulie in his _Recherches sur Moliere_, 1863. we find: "a ... dress for the _Cocu imaginaire_, consisting of knee-breeches, doublet, cloak, collar, and shoes, all in crimson red satin.") VILLEBREQUIN, _father to Valere_. GROS-RENE, _servant to Lelio_. A RELATIVE OF SGANARELLE'S WIFE. CELIA, _daughter of Gorgibus_. SGANARELLE'S WIFE. CELIA'S MAID. _Scene_.--A PUBLICK PLACE IN PARIS.... Plays - Post by : emb582 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Moliere - Read : 3451

Sganarelle; Or, The Self-deceived Husband - Introductory Notice Sganarelle; Or, The Self-deceived Husband - Introductory Notice

Sganarelle; Or, The Self-deceived Husband - Introductory Notice
SGANARELLE: OR THE SELF-DECEIVED HUSBAND. A COMEDY IN ONE ACT. (_THE ORIGINAL IN VERSE_.) 28TH MAY, 1660. INTRODUCTORY NOTICE. Six months after the brilliant success of the _Precieuses Ridicules_, Moliere brought out at the Theatre du Petit-Bourbon a new comedy, called _Sganarelle, ou le Cocu Imaginaire_, which I have translated by _Sganarelle, or the self-deceived Husband_. It has been said that Moliere owed the first idea of this piece to an Italian farce, _Il Ritratto ovvero Arlichino cornuto per opinione_, but, as it has never been printed, it is difficult to decide at the present time whether or not this be... Plays - Post by : emb582 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Moliere - Read : 2710

The Middle Class Gentleman - Act 5 The Middle Class Gentleman - Act 5

The Middle Class Gentleman - Act 5
ACT VSCENE I (Madame Jourdaine, Monsieur Jourdain) MADAME JOURDAIN. Ah, My God! Mercy! What is all of this? What a spectacle! Are you dressed for a masquerade, and is this a time to go masked? Speak then, what is this? Who has bundled you up like that? MONSIEUR JOURDAIN. See the impertinent woman, to speak in this way to a Mamamouchi! MADAME JOURDAIN. How's that? MONSIEUR JOURDAIN. Yes, you must show me respect now, as I've just been made a Mamamouchi. MADAME JOURDAIN. What are you trying to say with your Mamamouchi? MONSIEUR JOURDAIN. Mamamouchi, I tell you. I'm a Mamamouchi.... Plays - Post by : emb582 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Moliere - Read : 3642

The Middle Class Gentleman - Act 4 The Middle Class Gentleman - Act 4

The Middle Class Gentleman - Act 4
ACT IVSCENE I (Dorimene, Monsieur Jourdain, Dorante, two Male Musicians, a Female Musician, Lackeys) DORIMENE. Why, Dorante, that is really a magnificent repast! MONSIEUR JOURDAIN. You jest, Madame; I wish it were worthy of being offered to you. (All sit at the table). DORANTE. Monsieur Jourdain is right, Madame, to speak so, and he obliges me by making you so welcome. I agree with him that the repast is not worthy of you. Since it was I who ordered it, and since I do not have the accomplishments of our friends in this matter, you do not have here a very... Plays - Post by : emb582 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Moliere - Read : 1236

The Middle Class Gentleman - The Cast The Middle Class Gentleman - The Cast

The Middle Class Gentleman - The Cast
THE MIDDLE CLASS GENTLEMAN (Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme) By MOLIERE (Jean-Baptiste Poquelin, 1622-1673) Translated by Philip Dwight Jones Comedy-Ballet presented at Chambord, for the entertainment of the King, in the month of October 1670, and to the public in Paris for the first time at the Palais-Royal Theater 23 November 1670 The Cast Monsieur Jourdain, bourgeois. Madame Jourdain, his wife. Lucile, their daughter. Nicole, maid. Cleonte, suitor of Lucile. Covielle, Cleonte's valet.... Plays - Post by : emb582 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Moliere - Read : 1998

The Magnificent Lovers - Act 5 The Magnificent Lovers - Act 5

The Magnificent Lovers - Act 5
ACT VSCENE I.--ERIPHYLE, CLITIDAS. CLI. Where shall I go? which way shall I turn? Where am I likely to find the Princess Eriphyle? It is no small pleasure to be the first to bring news. Ah! here she is! Madam, I come to tell you that heaven has just now given you the husband it reserved for you. ERI. Alas! leave me, Clitidas, to my gloomy sorrow. CLI. Madam, I beg your pardon, I thought I did well to come and tell you that heaven has given you Sostratus for a husband; but, since it is unpleasant to you, I will... Plays - Post by : emb582 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Moliere - Read : 2667

The Magnificent Lovers - Act 4 The Magnificent Lovers - Act 4

The Magnificent Lovers - Act 4
ACT IVSCENE I.--ARISTIONE, ERIPHYLE. ARI. Nothing can be more gallant or better contrived. My daughter, I wished to come alone here with you, so that we may have a little quiet talk together; and I hope that you will in nothing hide the truth from me. Have you in your heart no secret inclination which you are unwilling to reveal to me? ERI. I, Madam? ARI. Speak openly, daughter; what I have done for you well deserves that you should be frank and open with me. To make you the sole object of all my thoughts, to prefer you above all... Plays - Post by : emb582 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Moliere - Read : 2176

The Magnificent Lovers - Act 3 The Magnificent Lovers - Act 3

The Magnificent Lovers - Act 3
ACT III(ARISTIONE, IPHICRATES, TIMOCLES, ERIPHYLE, ANAXARCHUS, SOSTRATUS, CLITIDAS.) ARI. We must always repeat the same words. We have always to exclaim: This is admirable! Wonderful! It is beyond all that has ever been seen. TIM. You bestow too much praise on these trifles, Madam. ARI. Such trifles may agreeably engage the thoughts of the most serious people. Indeed, my daughter, you have cause to be thankful to these princes, and you can never repay all the trouble they take for you. ERI. I am deeply grateful for it, Madam. ARI. And yet you make them languish a long time for what... Plays - Post by : emb582 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Moliere - Read : 3300

The Magnificent Lovers - Act 2 The Magnificent Lovers - Act 2

The Magnificent Lovers - Act 2
ACT IISCENE I.--ERIPHYLE, CLEONICE. ERI. This is admirable! I do not think any dancing could ever be better; and I am glad to have them belonging to me. CLEON. And I am very glad, Madam, for you to see that my taste is not so bad as you thought. ERI. Do not be so triumphant. You won't be long before giving me my revenge. Leave me alone here.  SCENE II.--ERIPHYLE, CLEONICE, CLITIDAS. CLEON. (_going to meet CLITIDAS). I warn you, Clitidas, that the princess wishes to be alone. CLI. Leave that to me. I understand court etiquette.  SCENE III.--ERIPHYLE, CLITIDAS. CLI.... Plays - Post by : emb582 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Moliere - Read : 2098

The Magnificent Lovers - Act 1 The Magnificent Lovers - Act 1

The Magnificent Lovers - Act 1
ACT ISCENE I.--SOSTRATUS, CLITIDAS. CLI. (_aside_). He is buried in thought. SOS. (_believing himself alone_). No, Sostratus, I do not see where you can look for help, and your troubles are of a kind to leave you no hope. CLI. (_aside_). He is talking to himself. SOS. (_believing himself alone_). Alas! CLI. These sighs must mean something, and my surmise will prove correct. SOS. (_believing himself alone_). Upon what fancies can you build any hope? And what else can you expect but the protracted length of a miserable existence, and sorrow to end only with life itself. CLI. (_aside_). His head... Plays - Post by : emb582 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Moliere - Read : 3206

The Magnificent Lovers - Preface The Magnificent Lovers - Preface

The Magnificent Lovers - Preface
THE MAGNIFICENT LOVERS (LES AMANTS MAGNIFIQUES) by MOLIERE Translated into English Prose. With Short Introductions and Explanatory Notes. by CHARLES HERON WALL The subject of this play was given by Louis XIV. It was acted before him at Saint-Germain-en-Laye, on February 4, 1670, but was never represented in Paris, and was only printed after Moliere's death. It is one of the weakest plays of Moliere, upon whom unfortunately now rested the whole responsibility of the court entertainments. His attack upon astrology is the most interesting part. Moliere acted the part of Clitidas.  PREFACE BY THE AUTHOR. The King, who will have... Plays - Post by : emb582 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Moliere - Read : 2284

Monsieur De Pourceaugnac - Persons Represented Monsieur De Pourceaugnac - Persons Represented

Monsieur De Pourceaugnac - Persons Represented
MR. DE POURCEAUGNAC. by MOLIERE Translated by Charles Heron WallTranslated into English Prose. With Short Introductions and Explanatory Notes. by CHARLES HERON WALL 'Monsieur de Pourceaugnac', acted on October 6, 1669, is nothing but a farce. But Moliere excels in farce as well as in higher comedy, and 'Monsieur de Pourceaugnac' is one of the best of its kind. The attacks upon the doctors of the time are not exaggerated. Moliere acted the part of Mr. de Pourceaugnac. PERSONS REPRESENTED. MR. DE POURCEAUGNAC. ORONTE, _father to JULIA. ERASTE, _lover to JULIA. SBRIGANI, _a Neapolitan adventurer_. FIRST PHYSICIAN. SECOND PHYSICIAN. AN... Plays - Post by : emb582 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Moliere - Read : 2751

The School For Husbands - Act 3 The School For Husbands - Act 3

The School For Husbands - Act 3
ACT IIISCENE I.--ISABELLA, _alone_. Yes, death seems to me a hundred times less dreadful than this fatal marriage into which I am forced; all that I am doing to escape its horrors should excuse me in the eyes of those who blame me. Time presses; it is night; now, then, let me fearlessly entrust my fate to a lover's fidelity.  SCENE II.--SGANARELLE, ISABELLA. SGAN. (_Speaking to those inside the house_). Here I am once more; to-morrow they are going, in my name... ISA. O Heaven! SGAN. Is it you, darling? Where are you going so late? You said when I left... Plays - Post by : prospertogether - Date : May 2012 - Author : Moliere - Read : 1431

The School For Husbands - Act 2 The School For Husbands - Act 2

The School For Husbands - Act 2
ACT IISCENE I.--ISABELLA, SGANARELLE. SGAN. That will do; I know the house, and the person, simply from the description you have given me. ISA. (_Aside_). Heaven, be propitious, and favour to-day the artful contrivance of an innocent love! SGAN. Do you say they have told you that his name is Valère? ISA. Yes. SGAN. That will do; do not make yourself uneasy about it. Go inside, and leave me to act. I am going at once to talk to this young madcap. ISA. (_As she goes in_). For a girl, I am planning a pretty bold scheme. But the unreasonable severity... Plays - Post by : prospertogether - Date : May 2012 - Author : Moliere - Read : 2122

The School For Husbands - Act 1 The School For Husbands - Act 1

The School For Husbands - Act 1
ACT ISCENE I.--SGANARELLE, ARISTE. SGAN. Pray, brother, let us talk less, and let each of us live as he likes. Though you have the advantage of me in years, and are old enough to be wise, yet I tell you that I mean to receive none of your reproofs; that my fancy is the only counsellor I shall follow, and that I am quite satisfied with my way of living. AR. But every one condemns it. SGAN. Yes, fools like yourself, brother. AR. Thank you very much. It is a pleasant compliment. SGAN. I should like to know, since one ought... Plays - Post by : prospertogether - Date : May 2012 - Author : Moliere - Read : 574

The School For Husbands - Dramatis Personae The School For Husbands - Dramatis Personae

The School For Husbands - Dramatis Personae
SGANARELLE, (Footnote: This part was played by Molière himself. In the inventory taken after Molière's death, and given by M. Soulié, we find: "A dress for _The School for Husbands_, consisting of breeches, doublet, cloak, collar, purse and girdle, all of a kind of brown coloured (_couleur de muse_) satin.") } } _brothers_. ARISTE, )VALÈRE, _lover to Isabella_. ERGASTE, _servant to Valère_. A MAGISTRATE. (Footnote: The original has _un Commissaire_, who in Molière's time, appears to have been a... Plays - Post by : prospertogether - Date : May 2012 - Author : Moliere - Read : 2170