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Following The Equator - Chapter XXIII Following The Equator - Chapter XXIII

Following The Equator - Chapter XXIII
Be careless in your dress if you must, but keep a tidy soul. --Pudd'nhead Wilson's New Calendar.We left Adelaide in due course, and went to Horsham, in the colony of Victoria; a good deal of a journey, if I remember rightly, but pleasant. Horsham sits in a plain which is as level as a floor--one of those famous dead levels which Australian books describe so often; gray, bare, sombre, melancholy, baked, cracked, in the tedious long drouths, but a horizonless ocean of vivid green grass the day after a rain. A country town, peaceful, reposeful, inviting, full of snug homes, with... Nonfictions - Post by : ccain - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 1542

Following The Equator - Chapter XXII Following The Equator - Chapter XXII

Following The Equator - Chapter XXII
Nothing is so ignorant as a man's left hand, except a lady's watch. --Pudd'nhead Wilson's New Calendar.You notice that Mrs. Praed knows her art. She can place a thing before you so that you can see it. She is not alone in that. Australia is fertile in writers whose books are faithful mirrors of the life of the country and of its history. The materials were surprisingly rich, both in quality and in mass, and Marcus Clarke, Ralph Boldrewood, Cordon, Kendall, and the others, have built out of them a brilliant and vigorous literature, and one which must endure. Materials--there is... Nonfictions - Post by : rlene - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 987

Following The Equator - Chapter XXI Following The Equator - Chapter XXI

Following The Equator - Chapter XXI
Man will do many things to get himself loved, he will do all things to get himself envied. --Pudd'nhead Wilson's New Calendar.Before I saw Australia I had never heard of the "weet-weet" at all. I met but few men who had seen it thrown--at least I met but few who mentioned having seen it thrown. Roughly described, it is a fat wooden cigar with its butt-end fastened to a flexible twig. The whole thing is only a couple of feet long, and weighs less than two ounces. This feather--so to call it--is not thrown through the air, but is flung with... Nonfictions - Post by : jasonmangrum - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 2139

Following The Equator - Chapter XX Following The Equator - Chapter XX

Following The Equator - Chapter XX
It is by the goodness of God that in our country we have those three unspeakably precious things: freedom of speech, freedom of conscience, and the prudence never to practice either of them. --Pudd'nhead Wilson's New Calendar.From diary:Mr. G. called. I had not seen him since Nauheim, Germany--several years ago; the time that the cholera broke out at Hamburg. We talked of the people we had known there, or had casually met; and G. said:"Do you remember my introducing you to an earl--the Earl of C.?""Yes. That was the last time I saw you. You and he were in a carriage,... Nonfictions - Post by : peerless - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 2883

Following The Equator - Chapter XIX Following The Equator - Chapter XIX

Following The Equator - Chapter XIX
Pity is for the living, Envy is for the dead. --Pudd'nhead Wilson's New Calendar.The successor of the sheet-iron hamlet of the mangrove marshes has that other Australian specialty, the Botanical Gardens. We cannot have these paradises. The best we could do would be to cover a vast acreage under glass and apply steam heat. But it would be inadequate, the lacks would still be so great: the confined sense, the sense of suffocation, the atmospheric dimness, the sweaty heat--these would all be there, in place of the Australian openness to the sky, the sunshine and the breeze. Whatever will grow under... Nonfictions - Post by : cherman - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 3614

Following The Equator - Chapter XVIII Following The Equator - Chapter XVIII

Following The Equator - Chapter XVIII
It is easier to stay out than get out. --Pudd'nhead Wilson's New Calendar.The train was now exploring a beautiful hill country, and went twisting in and out through lovely little green valleys. There were several varieties of gum trees; among them many giants. Some of them were bodied and barked like the sycamore; some were of fantastic aspect, and reminded one of the quaint apple trees in Japanese pictures. And there was one peculiarly beautiful tree whose name and breed I did not know. The foliage seemed to consist of big bunches of pine-spines, the lower half of each bunch a... Nonfictions - Post by : redbrad0 - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 1554

Following The Equator - Chapter XVII Following The Equator - Chapter XVII

Following The Equator - Chapter XVII
The English are mentioned in the Bible: Blessed are the meek, for they shall inherit the earth. --Pudd'nhead Wilson's New Calendar.When we consider the immensity of the British Empire in territory, population, and trade, it requires a stern exercise of faith to believe in the figures which represent Australasia's contribution to the Empire's commercial grandeur. As compared with the landed estate of the British Empire, the landed estate dominated by any other Power except one --Russia--is not very impressive for size. My authorities make the British Empire not much short of a fourth larger than the Russian Empire. Roughly proportioned, if... Nonfictions - Post by : PhotoCrib - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 1944

Following The Equator - Chapter XVI Following The Equator - Chapter XVI

Following The Equator - Chapter XVI
There is a Moral sense, and there is an Immoral Sense. History shows us that the Moral Sense enables us to perceive morality and how to avoid it, and that the Immoral Sense enables us to perceive immorality and how to enjoy it. -Pudd'nhead Wilson's New Calendar.Melbourne spreads around over an immense area of ground. It is a stately city architecturally as well as in magnitude. It has an elaborate system of cable-car service; it has museums, and colleges, and schools, and public gardens, and electricity, and gas, and libraries, and theaters, and mining centers, and wool centers, and centers of... Nonfictions - Post by : lotherin - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 839

Following The Equator - Chapter XV Following The Equator - Chapter XV

Following The Equator - Chapter XV
Truth is stranger than fiction--to some people, but I am measurably familiar with it. --Pudd'nhead Wilson's New Calendar.Truth is stranger than fiction, but it is because Fiction is obliged to stick to possibilities; Truth isn't. --Pudd'nhead Wilson's New Calendar.The air was balmy and delicious, the sunshine radiant; it was a charming excursion. In the course of it we came to a town whose odd name was famous all over the world a quarter of a century ago--Wagga-Wagga. This was because the Tichborne Claimant had kept a butcher-shop there. It was out of the midst of his humble collection of sausages and... Nonfictions - Post by : colleyp - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 1719

Following The Equator - Chapter XIV Following The Equator - Chapter XIV

Following The Equator - Chapter XIV
We can secure other people's approval, if we do right and try hard; but our own is worth a hundred of it, and no way has been found out ofsecuring that. --Pudd'nhead Wilson's New Calendar.My health had broken down in New York in May; it had remained in a doubtful but fairish condition during a succeeding period of 82 days; it broke again on the Pacific. It broke again in Sydney, but not until after I had had a good outing, and had also filled my lecture engagements. This latest break lost me the chance of seeing Queensland. In the circumstances,... Nonfictions - Post by : 66034 - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 2896

Following The Equator - Chapter XIII Following The Equator - Chapter XIII

Following The Equator - Chapter XIII
The timid man yearns for full value and asks a tenth. The bold man strikes for double value and compromises on par. --Pudd'nhead Wilson's New Calendar.One is sure to be struck by the liberal way in which Australasia spends money upon public works--such as legislative buildings, town halls, hospitals, asylums, parks, and botanical gardens. I should say that where minor towns in America spend a hundred dollars on the town hall and on public parks and gardens, the like towns in Australasia spend a thousand. And I think that this ratio will hold good in the matter of hospitals, also. I... Nonfictions - Post by : worksmartincome - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 1770

Following The Equator - Chapter XII Following The Equator - Chapter XII

Following The Equator - Chapter XII
There are those who scoff at the schoolboy, calling him frivolous and shallow: Yet it was the schoolboy who said "Faith is believing what you know ain't so." --Pudd'nhead Wilson's New Calendar.In Sydney I had a large dream, and in the course of talk I told it to a missionary from India who was on his way to visit some relatives in New Zealand. I dreamed that the visible universe is the physical person of God; that the vast worlds that we see twinkling millions of miles apart in the fields of space are the blood corpuscles in His veins; and... Nonfictions - Post by : snichols - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 1427

Following The Equator - Chapter XI Following The Equator - Chapter XI

Following The Equator - Chapter XI
We should be careful to get out of an experience only the wisdom that is in it--and stop there; lest we be like the cat that sits down on a hotstove-lid. She will never sit down on a hot stove-lid again--and that is well; but also she will never sit down on a cold one any more. --Pudd'nhead Wilson's New Calendar.All English-speaking colonies are made up of lavishly hospitable people, and New South Wales and its capital are like the rest in this. The English-speaking colony of the United States of America is always called lavishly hospitable by the English traveler.... Nonfictions - Post by : kenmat - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 3099

Following The Equator - Chapter X Following The Equator - Chapter X

Following The Equator - Chapter X
Everything human is pathetic. The secret source of Humor itself is not joy but sorrow. There is no humor in heaven. --Pudd'nhead Wilson's New Calendar.Captain Cook found Australia in 1770, and eighteen years later the British Government began to transport convicts to it. Altogether, New South Wales received 83,000 in 53 years. The convicts wore heavy chains; they were ill-fed and badly treated by the officers set over them; they were heavily punished for even slight infractions of the rules; "the cruelest discipline ever known" is one historian's description of their life.--(The Story of Australasia. J. S. Laurie.)English law was hard-hearted... Nonfictions - Post by : Thomas_Trotts - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 1826

Following The Equator - Chapter IX Following The Equator - Chapter IX

Following The Equator - Chapter IX
It is your human environment that makes climate. --Pudd'nhead Wilson's New Calendar.Sept. 15--Night. Close to Australia now. Sydney 50 miles distant.That note recalls an experience. The passengers were sent for, to come up in the bow and see a fine sight. It was very dark. One could not follow with the eye the surface of the sea more than fifty yards in any direction it dimmed away and became lost to sight at about that distance from us. But if you patiently gazed into the darkness a little while, there was a sure reward for you. Presently, a quarter of a... Nonfictions - Post by : helmer - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 2676

Following The Equator - Chapter VIII Following The Equator - Chapter VIII

Following The Equator - Chapter VIII
It could probably be shown by facts and figures that there is nodistinctly native American criminal class except Congress. --Pudd'nhead Wilson's New Calendar.When one glances at the map the members of the stupendous island wilderness of the Pacific seem to crowd upon each other; but no, there is no crowding, even in the center of a group; and between groups there are lonely wide deserts of sea. Not everything is known about the islands, their peoples and their languages. A startling reminder of this is furnished by the fact that in Fiji, twenty years ago, were living two strange and solitary... Nonfictions - Post by : wellnesscoach - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 2764

Following The Equator - Chapter VII Following The Equator - Chapter VII

Following The Equator - Chapter VII
Truth is the most valuable thing we have. Let us economize it. --Pudd'nhead Wilson's New Calendar.From Diary:--For a day or two we have been plowing among an invisible vast wilderness of islands, catching now and then a shadowy glimpse of a member of it. There does seem to be a prodigious lot of islands this year; the map of this region is freckled and fly-specked all over with them. Their number would seem to be uncountable. We are moving among the Fijis now--224 islands and islets in the group. In front of us, to the west, the wilderness stretches toward Australia,... Nonfictions - Post by : GuruGazette - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 1041

Following The Equator - Chapter VI Following The Equator - Chapter VI

Following The Equator - Chapter VI
He was as shy as a newspaper is when referring to its own merits. --Pudd'nhead Wilson's New Calendar.Captain Wawn is crystal-clear on one point: He does not approve of missionaries. They obstruct his business. They make "Recruiting," as he calls it ("Slave-Catching," as they call it in their frank way) a trouble when it ought to be just a picnic and a pleasure excursion. The missionaries have their opinion about the manner in which the Labor Traffic is conducted, and about the recruiter's evasions of the law of the Traffic, and about the traffic itself--and it is distinctly uncomplimentary to the... Nonfictions - Post by : hunter - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 633

Following The Equator - Chapter V Following The Equator - Chapter V

Following The Equator - Chapter V
Noise proves nothing. Often a hen who has merely laid an egg cackles as if she had laid an asteroid. --Pudd'nhead Wilson's New Calendar.WEDNESDAY, Sept. 11. In this world we often make mistakes of judgment. We do not as a rule get out of them sound and whole, but sometimes we do. At dinner yesterday evening-present, a mixture of Scotch, English, American, Canadian, and Australasian folk--a discussion broke out about the pronunciation of certain Scottish words. This was private ground, and the non-Scotch nationalities, with one exception, discreetly kept still. But I am not discreet, and I took a hand. I... Nonfictions - Post by : Adam_Davis - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 1543

Following The Equator - Chapter IV Following The Equator - Chapter IV

Following The Equator - Chapter IV
A dozen direct censures are easier to bear than one morganatic compliment. --Pudd'nhead Wilson's New Calendar.Sailed from Honolulu.--From diary:Sept. 2. Flocks of flying fish-slim, shapely, graceful, and intensely white. With the sun on them they look like a flight of silver fruit-knives. They are able to fly a hundred yards.Sept. 3. In 9 deg. 50' north latitude, at breakfast. Approaching the equator on a long slant. Those of us who have never seen the equator are a good deal excited. I think I would rather see it than any other thing in the world. We entered the "doldrums" last night--variable winds,... Nonfictions - Post by : Jonathon_Mays - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 2072