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Following The Equator - Chapter III Following The Equator - Chapter III

Following The Equator - Chapter III
It is more trouble to make a maxim than it is to do right. --Pudd'nhead Wilson's New Calendar.On the seventh day out we saw a dim vast bulk standing up out of the wastes of the Pacific and knew that that spectral promontory was Diamond Head, a piece of this world which I had not seen before for twenty-nine years. So we were nearing Honolulu, the capital city of the Sandwich Islands--those islands which to me were Paradise; a Paradise which I had been longing all those years to see again. Not any other thing in the world could have stirred... Nonfictions - Post by : Clifford - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 2658

Following The Equator - Chapter II Following The Equator - Chapter II

Following The Equator - Chapter II
When in doubt, tell the truth. --Pudd'nhead Wilson's New Calendar.About four days out from Victoria we plunged into hot weather, and all the male passengers put on white linen clothes. One or two days later we crossed the 25th parallel of north latitude, and then, by order, the officers of the ship laid away their blue uniforms and came out in white linen ones. All the ladies were in white by this time. This prevalence of snowy costumes gave the promenade deck an invitingly cool, and cheerful and picnicky aspect.From my diary:There are several sorts of ills in the world from... Nonfictions - Post by : DaveMercer - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 3053

Following The Equator - Chapter I Following The Equator - Chapter I

Following The Equator - Chapter I
A man may have no bad habits and have worse. --Pudd'nhead Wilson's New Calendar.The starting point of this lecturing-trip around the world was Paris we had been living a year or two.We sailed for America, and there made certain preparations. This took but little time. Two members of my family elected to go with me. Also a carbuncle. The dictionary says a carbuncle is a kind of jewel. Humor is out of place in a dictionary.We started westward from New York in midsummer, with Major Pond to manage the platform-business as far as the Pacific. It was warm work, all... Nonfictions - Post by : gmangin - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 803

Personal Recollections Of Joan Of Arc - BOOK III. TRIAL AND MARTYRDOM - CONCLUSION Personal Recollections Of Joan Of Arc - BOOK III. TRIAL AND MARTYRDOM - CONCLUSION

Personal Recollections Of Joan Of Arc - BOOK III. TRIAL AND MARTYRDOM - CONCLUSION
JOAN'S BROTHER Jacques died in Domremy during the Great Trial at Rouen. This was according to the prophecy which Joan made that day in the pastures the time that she said the rest of us would go to the great wars.When her poor old father heard of the martyrdom it broke his heart, and he died.The mother was granted a pension by the city of Orleans, and upon this she lived out her days, which were many. Twenty-four years after her illustrious child's death she traveled all the way to Paris in the winter-time and was present at the opening of... Long Stories - Post by : curious_publish - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 1145

Personal Recollections Of Joan Of Arc - BOOK III. TRIAL AND MARTYRDOM - Chapter 24. Joan the Martyr Personal Recollections Of Joan Of Arc - BOOK III. TRIAL AND MARTYRDOM - Chapter 24. Joan the Martyr

Personal Recollections Of Joan Of Arc - BOOK III. TRIAL AND MARTYRDOM - Chapter 24. Joan the Martyr
AT NINE o'clock the Maid of Orleans, Deliverer of France, went forth in the grace of her innocence and her youth to lay down her life for the country she loved with such devotion, and for the King that had abandoned her. She sat in the cart that is used only for felons. In one respect she was treated worse than a felon; for whereas she was on her way to be sentenced by the civil arm, she already bore her judgment inscribed in advance upon a miter-shaped cap which she wore:HERETIC, RELAPSED, APOSTATE, IDOLATERIn the cart with her sat the... Long Stories - Post by : Robin - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 1078

Personal Recollections Of Joan Of Arc - BOOK III. TRIAL AND MARTYRDOM - Chapter 23. The Time Is at Hand Personal Recollections Of Joan Of Arc - BOOK III. TRIAL AND MARTYRDOM - Chapter 23. The Time Is at Hand

Personal Recollections Of Joan Of Arc - BOOK III. TRIAL AND MARTYRDOM - Chapter 23. The Time Is at Hand
THE YOUNG can sink into abysses of despondency, and it was so with Noel and me now; but the hopes of the young are quick to rise again, and it was so with ours. We called back that vague promise of the Voices, and said the one to the other that the glorious release was to happen at "the last moment"--"that other time was not the last moment, but this is; it will happen now; the King will come, La Hire will come, and with them our veterans, and behind them all France!" And so we were full of heart again,... Long Stories - Post by : mkollerup - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 2117

Personal Recollections Of Joan Of Arc - BOOK III. TRIAL AND MARTYRDOM - Chapter 22. Joan Gives the Fatal Answer Personal Recollections Of Joan Of Arc - BOOK III. TRIAL AND MARTYRDOM - Chapter 22. Joan Gives the Fatal Answer

Personal Recollections Of Joan Of Arc - BOOK III. TRIAL AND MARTYRDOM - Chapter 22. Joan Gives the Fatal Answer
FRIDAY and Saturday were happy days for Noel and me. Our minds were full of our splendid dream of France aroused--France shaking her mane--France on the march--France at the gates--Rouen in ashes, and Joan free! Our imagination was on fire; we were delirious with pride and joy. For we were very young, as I have said.We knew nothing about what had been happening in the dungeon in the yester-afternoon. We supposed that as Joan had abjured and been taken back into the forgiving bosom of the Church, she was being gently used now, and her captivity made as pleasant and comfortable... Long Stories - Post by : Jerry_Zhou - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 3274

Personal Recollections Of Joan Of Arc - BOOK III. TRIAL AND MARTYRDOM - Chapter 21. Respited Only for Torture Personal Recollections Of Joan Of Arc - BOOK III. TRIAL AND MARTYRDOM - Chapter 21. Respited Only for Torture

Personal Recollections Of Joan Of Arc - BOOK III. TRIAL AND MARTYRDOM - Chapter 21. Respited Only for Torture
THERE IS no certainty that any one in all Rouen was in the secret of the deep game which Cauchon was playing except the Cardinal of Winchester. Then you can imagine the astonishment and stupefaction of that vast mob gathered there and those crowds of churchmen assembled on the two platforms, when they saw Joan of Arc moving away, alive and whole--slipping out of their grip at last, after all this tedious waiting, all this tantalizing expectancy.Nobody was able to stir or speak for a while, so paralyzing was the universal astonishment, so unbelievable the fact that the stake was actually... Long Stories - Post by : shedevil13 - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 725

Personal Recollections Of Joan Of Arc - BOOK III. TRIAL AND MARTYRDOM - Chapter 20. The Betrayal Personal Recollections Of Joan Of Arc - BOOK III. TRIAL AND MARTYRDOM - Chapter 20. The Betrayal

Personal Recollections Of Joan Of Arc - BOOK III. TRIAL AND MARTYRDOM - Chapter 20. The Betrayal
IN THE MORNING I was at my official post. It was on a platform raised the height of a man, in the churchyard, under the eaves of St. Ouen. On this same platform was a crowd of priests and important citizens, and several lawyers. Abreast it, with a small space between, was another and larger platform, handsomely canopied against sun and rain, and richly carpeted; also it was furnished with comfortable chairs, and with two which were more sumptuous than the others, and raised above the general level. One of these two was occupied by a prince of the royal blood... Long Stories - Post by : Finner - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 2084

Personal Recollections Of Joan Of Arc - BOOK III. TRIAL AND MARTYRDOM - Chapter 19. Our Last Hopes of Rescue Fail Personal Recollections Of Joan Of Arc - BOOK III. TRIAL AND MARTYRDOM - Chapter 19. Our Last Hopes of Rescue Fail

Personal Recollections Of Joan Of Arc - BOOK III. TRIAL AND MARTYRDOM - Chapter 19. Our Last Hopes of Rescue Fail
JOAN HAD been adjudged guilty of heresy, sorcery, and all the other terrible crimes set forth in the Twelve Articles, and her life was in Cauchon's hands at last. He could send her to the stake at once. His work was finished now, you think? He was satisfied? Not at all. What would his Archbishopric be worth if the people should get the idea into their heads that this faction of interested priests, slaving under the English lash, had wrongly condemned and burned Joan of Arc, Deliverer of France? That would be to make of her a holy martyr. Then her... Long Stories - Post by : ProWeber - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 1731

Personal Recollections Of Joan Of Arc - BOOK III. TRIAL AND MARTYRDOM - Chapter 18. Condemned Yet Unafraid Personal Recollections Of Joan Of Arc - BOOK III. TRIAL AND MARTYRDOM - Chapter 18. Condemned Yet Unafraid

Personal Recollections Of Joan Of Arc - BOOK III. TRIAL AND MARTYRDOM - Chapter 18. Condemned Yet Unafraid
TOWARD THE END of the ten-day interval the University of Paris rendered its decision concerning the Twelve Articles. By this finding, Joan was guilty upon all the counts: she must renounce her errors and make satisfaction, or be abandoned to the secular arm for punishment.The University's mind was probably already made up before the Articles were laid before it; yet it took it from the fifth to the eighteenth to produce its verdict. I think the delay may have been caused by temporary difficulties concerning two points:1. As to who the fiends were who were represented in Joan's Voices; 2. As... Long Stories - Post by : Carmelo - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 3087

Personal Recollections Of Joan Of Arc - BOOK III. TRIAL AND MARTYRDOM - Chapter 17. Supreme in Direst Peril Personal Recollections Of Joan Of Arc - BOOK III. TRIAL AND MARTYRDOM - Chapter 17. Supreme in Direst Peril

Personal Recollections Of Joan Of Arc - BOOK III. TRIAL AND MARTYRDOM - Chapter 17. Supreme in Direst Peril
ANOTHER ten days' wait. The great theologians of that treasury of all valuable knowledge and all wisdom, the University of Paris, were still weighing and considering and discussing the Twelve Lies.I had had but little to do these ten days, so I spent them mainly in walks about the town with Noel. But there was no pleasure in them, our spirits being so burdened with cares, and the outlook for Joan growing steadily darker and darker all the time. And then we naturally contrasted our circumstances with hers: this freedom and sunshine, with her darkness and chains; our comradeship, with her... Long Stories - Post by : results99 - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 2222

Personal Recollections Of Joan Of Arc - BOOK III. TRIAL AND MARTYRDOM - Chapter 16. Joan Stands Defiant Before the Rack Personal Recollections Of Joan Of Arc - BOOK III. TRIAL AND MARTYRDOM - Chapter 16. Joan Stands Defiant Before the Rack

Personal Recollections Of Joan Of Arc - BOOK III. TRIAL AND MARTYRDOM - Chapter 16. Joan Stands Defiant Before the Rack
THE BRILLIANT weather, the heavenly weather, the bewitching weather made everybody's heart to sing, as I have told you; yes, Rouen was feeling light-hearted and gay, and most willing and ready to break out and laugh upon the least occasion; and so when the news went around that the young girl in the tower had scored another defeat against Bishop Cauchon there was abundant laughter--abundant laughter among the citizens of both parties, for they all hated the Bishop. It is true, the English-hearted majority of the people wanted Joan burned, but that did not keep them from laughing at the man... Long Stories - Post by : Moneystreets - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 3438

Personal Recollections Of Joan Of Arc - BOOK III. TRIAL AND MARTYRDOM - Chapter 15. Undaunted by Threat of Burning Personal Recollections Of Joan Of Arc - BOOK III. TRIAL AND MARTYRDOM - Chapter 15. Undaunted by Threat of Burning

Personal Recollections Of Joan Of Arc - BOOK III. TRIAL AND MARTYRDOM - Chapter 15. Undaunted by Threat of Burning
TWO WEEKS went by; the second of May was come, the chill was departed out of the air, the wild flowers were springing in the glades and glens, the birds were piping in the woods, all nature was brilliant with sunshine, all spirits were renewed and refreshed, all hearts glad, the world was alive with hope and cheer, the plain beyond the Seine stretched away soft and rich and green, the river was limpid and lovely, the leafy islands were dainty to see, and flung still daintier reflections of themselves upon the shining water; and from the tall bluffs above the... Long Stories - Post by : Khemal - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 1070

Personal Recollections Of Joan Of Arc - BOOK III. TRIAL AND MARTYRDOM - Chapter 14. Joan Struggles with Her Twelve Lies Personal Recollections Of Joan Of Arc - BOOK III. TRIAL AND MARTYRDOM - Chapter 14. Joan Struggles with Her Twelve Lies

Personal Recollections Of Joan Of Arc - BOOK III. TRIAL AND MARTYRDOM - Chapter 14. Joan Struggles with Her Twelve Lies
WE WERE now in the first days of April. Joan was ill. She had fallen ill the 29th of March, the day after the close of the third trial, and was growing worse when the scene which I have just described occurred in her cell. It was just like Cauchon to go there and try to get some advantage out of her weakened state.Let us note some of the particulars in the new indictment--the Twelve Lies.Part of the first one says Joan asserts that she has found her salvation. She never said anything of the kind. It also says she refuses... Long Stories - Post by : Daniel_Stidham - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 2636

Personal Recollections Of Joan Of Arc - BOOK III. TRIAL AND MARTYRDOM - Chapter 13. The Third Trial Fails Personal Recollections Of Joan Of Arc - BOOK III. TRIAL AND MARTYRDOM - Chapter 13. The Third Trial Fails

Personal Recollections Of Joan Of Arc - BOOK III. TRIAL AND MARTYRDOM - Chapter 13. The Third Trial Fails
SO THE SECOND trial in the prison was over. Over, and no definite result. The character of it I have described to you. It was baser in one particular than the previous one; for this time the charges had not been communicated to Joan, therefore she had been obliged to fight in the dark.There was no opportunity to do any thinking beforehand; there was no foreseeing what traps might be set, and no way to prepare for them. Truly it was a shabby advantage to take of a girl situated as this one was. One day, during the course of it,... Long Stories - Post by : lisa77 - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 1136

Personal Recollections Of Joan Of Arc - BOOK III. TRIAL AND MARTYRDOM - Chapter 12. Joan's Master-Stroke Diverted Personal Recollections Of Joan Of Arc - BOOK III. TRIAL AND MARTYRDOM - Chapter 12. Joan's Master-Stroke Diverted

Personal Recollections Of Joan Of Arc - BOOK III. TRIAL AND MARTYRDOM - Chapter 12. Joan's Master-Stroke Diverted
NOW, as a next move, this small secret court of holy assassins did a thing so base that even at this day, in my old age, it is hard to speak of it with patience.In the beginning of her commerce with her Voices there at Domremy, the child Joan solemnly devoted her life to God, vowing her pure body and her pure soul to His service. You will remember that her parents tried to stop her from going to the wars by haling her to the court at Toul to compel her to make a marriage which she had never promised... Long Stories - Post by : visshop - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 3059

Personal Recollections Of Joan Of Arc - BOOK III. TRIAL AND MARTYRDOM - Chapter 11. Court Reorganized for Assassination Personal Recollections Of Joan Of Arc - BOOK III. TRIAL AND MARTYRDOM - Chapter 11. Court Reorganized for Assassination

Personal Recollections Of Joan Of Arc - BOOK III. TRIAL AND MARTYRDOM - Chapter 11. Court Reorganized for Assassination
A HALT was called. It was time. Cauchon was losing ground in the fight, Joan was gaining it.There were signs that here and there in the court a judge was being softened toward Joan by her courage, her presence of mind, her fortitude, her constancy, her piety, her simplicity and candor, her manifest purity, the nobility of her character, her fine intelligence, and the good brave fight she was making, all friendless and alone, against unfair odds, and there was grave room for fear that this softening process would spread further and presently bring Cauchon's plans in danger.Something must be done,... Long Stories - Post by : Scott_Doppke - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 1428

Personal Recollections Of Joan Of Arc - BOOK III. TRIAL AND MARTYRDOM - Chapter 10. The Inquisitors at Their Wits' End Personal Recollections Of Joan Of Arc - BOOK III. TRIAL AND MARTYRDOM - Chapter 10. The Inquisitors at Their Wits' End

Personal Recollections Of Joan Of Arc - BOOK III. TRIAL AND MARTYRDOM - Chapter 10. The Inquisitors at Their Wits' End
THE COURT rested a day, then took up work again on Saturday, the third of March.This was one of our stormiest sessions. The whole court was out of patience; and with good reason. These threescore distinguished churchmen, illustrious tacticians, veteran legal gladiators, had left important posts where their supervision was needed, to journey hither from various regions and accomplish a most simple and easy matter--condemn and send to death a country-lass of nineteen who could neither read nor write, knew nothing of the wiles and perplexities of legal procedure, could not call a single witness in her defense, was allowed no... Long Stories - Post by : Dave_Woolsey - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 3025

Personal Recollections Of Joan Of Arc - BOOK III. TRIAL AND MARTYRDOM - Chapter 9. Her Sure Deliverance Foretold Personal Recollections Of Joan Of Arc - BOOK III. TRIAL AND MARTYRDOM - Chapter 9. Her Sure Deliverance Foretold

Personal Recollections Of Joan Of Arc - BOOK III. TRIAL AND MARTYRDOM - Chapter 9. Her Sure Deliverance Foretold
THE NEXT sitting opened on Thursday the first of March. Fifty-eight judges present--the others resting.As usual, Joan was required to take an oath without reservations. She showed no temper this time. She considered herself well buttressed by the proces verbal compromise which Cauchon was so anxious to repudiate and creep out of; so she merely refused, distinctly and decidedly; and added, in a spirit of fairness and candor:"But as to matters set down in the proces verbal, I will freely tell the whole truth--yes, as freely and fully as if I were before the Pope."Here was a chance! We had two... Long Stories - Post by : Justin - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 3294