Author Mark Twain - Full Online Book

Full Online Books
BOOK CATEGORIES
Authors Authors Short Stories Short Stories Long Stories Long Stories Funny Stories Funny Stories Love Stories Love Stories Stories For Kids Stories For Kids Poems Poems Essays Essays Nonfictions Nonfictions Plays Plays Folktales Folktales Fairy Tales Fairy Tales Fables Fables Learning Kitchen Learning Kitchen
LINKS
Valid XHTML 1.0 Transitional Free Classified Website Without Registration Free Classified Website Daniel Company
Twitter Twitter Add book
donate

Full Online Book HomeAuthor Mark TwainPage 4

Famous Authors (View All Authors)

Following The Equator - Chapter XLIII Following The Equator - Chapter XLIII

Following The Equator - Chapter XLIII
Hunger is the handmaid of genius --Pudd'nhead Wilson's New Calendar.One day during our stay in Bombay there was a criminal trial of a most interesting sort, a terribly realistic chapter out of the "Arabian Nights," a strange mixture of simplicities and pieties and murderous practicalities, which brought back the forgotten days of Thuggee and made them live again; in fact, even made them believable. It was a case where a young girl had been assassinated for the sake of her trifling ornaments, things not worth a laborer's day's wages in America. This thing could have been done in many other countries,... Nonfictions - Post by : Hilton - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 1633

Following The Equator - Chapter XLII Following The Equator - Chapter XLII

Following The Equator - Chapter XLII
Each person is born to one possession which outvalues all his others--his last breath. --Pudd'nhead Wilson's New Calendar.Toward midnight, that night, there was another function. This was a Hindoo wedding--no, I think it was a betrothal ceremony. Always before, we had driven through streets that were multitudinous and tumultuous with picturesque native life, but now there was nothing of that. We seemed to move through a city of the dead. There was hardly a suggestion of life in those still and vacant streets. Even the crows were silent. But everywhere on the ground lay sleeping natives-hundreds and hundreds. They lay stretched... Nonfictions - Post by : nifelnox - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 885

Following The Equator - Chapter XLI Following The Equator - Chapter XLI

Following The Equator - Chapter XLI
There is an old-time toast which is golden for its beauty."When you ascend the hill of prosperity may you not meet a friend." --Pudd'nhead Wilson's New Calendar.The next picture that drifts across the field of my memory is one which is connected with religious things. We were taken by friends to see a Jain temple. It was small, and had many flags or streamers flying from poles standing above its roof; and its little battlements supported a great many small idols or images. Upstairs, inside, a solitary Jain was praying or reciting aloud in the middle of the room. Our presence... Nonfictions - Post by : jaydarby - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 3425

Following The Equator - Chapter XL Following The Equator - Chapter XL

Following The Equator - Chapter XL
Few of us can stand prosperity. Another man's, I mean. --Pudd'nhead Wilson's New Calendar.The next picture in my mind is Government House, on Malabar Point, with the wide sea-view from the windows and broad balconies; abode of His Excellency the Governor of the Bombay Presidency--a residence which is European in everything but the native guards and servants, and is a home and a palace of state harmoniously combined.That was England, the English power, the English civilization, the modern civilization--with the quiet elegancies and quiet colors and quiet tastes and quiet dignity that are the outcome of the modern cultivation. And following... Nonfictions - Post by : moorea - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 1577

Following The Equator - Chapter XXXIX Following The Equator - Chapter XXXIX

Following The Equator - Chapter XXXIX
By trying we can easily learn to endure adversity. Another man's, I mean. --Pudd'nhead Wilson's New Calendar.You soon find your long-ago dreams of India rising in a sort of vague and luscious moonlight above the horizon-rim of your opaque consciousness, and softly lighting up a thousand forgotten details which were parts of a vision that had once been vivid to you when you were a boy, and steeped your spirit in tales of the East. The barbaric gorgeousnesses, for instance; and the princely titles, the sumptuous titles, the sounding titles,--how good they taste in the mouth! The Nizam of Hyderabad; the... Nonfictions - Post by : texasrolex - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 1452

Following The Equator - Chapter XXXVIII Following The Equator - Chapter XXXVIII

Following The Equator - Chapter XXXVIII
Prosperity is the best protector of principle. --Pudd'nhead Wilson's New Calendar.EVENING--11th. Sailed in the Rosetta. This is a poor old ship, and ought to be insured and sunk. As in the 'Oceana', just so here: everybody dresses for dinner; they make it a sort of pious duty. These fine and formal costumes are a rather conspicuous contrast to the poverty and shabbiness of the surroundings . . . . If you want a slice of a lime at four o'clock tea, you must sign an order on the bar. Limes cost 14 cents a barrel.January 18th. We have been running up... Nonfictions - Post by : toppito - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 3173

Following The Equator - Chapter XXXVII Following The Equator - Chapter XXXVII

Following The Equator - Chapter XXXVII
To succeed in the other trades, capacity must be shown; in the law, concealment of it will do. --Pudd'nhead Wilson's New Calendar.MONDAY,--December 23, 1895. Sailed from Sydney for Ceylon in the P. & O. steamer 'Oceana'. A Lascar crew mans this ship--the first I have seen. White cotton petticoat and pants; barefoot; red shawl for belt; straw cap, brimless, on head, with red scarf wound around it; complexion a rich dark brown; short straight black hair; whiskers fine and silky; lustrous and intensely black. Mild, good faces; willing and obedient people; capable, too; but are said to go into hopeless panics... Nonfictions - Post by : bojan - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 3376

Following The Equator - Chapter XXXVI Following The Equator - Chapter XXXVI

Following The Equator - Chapter XXXVI
There are several good protections against temptations, but the surest is cowardice. --Pudd'nhead Wilson's New Calendar.Names are not always what they seem. The common Welsh name Bzjxxllwep is pronounced Jackson. --Pudd'nhead Wilson's New Calendar.Friday, December 13. Sailed, at 3 p.m., in the 'Mararoa'. Summer seas and a good ship-life has nothing better.Monday. Three days of paradise. Warm and sunny and smooth; the sea a luminous Mediterranean blue . . . . One lolls in a long chair all day under deck-awnings, and reads and smokes, in measureless content. One does not read prose at such a time, but poetry. I have... Nonfictions - Post by : dgammon - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 828

Following The Equator - Chapter XXXV Following The Equator - Chapter XXXV

Following The Equator - Chapter XXXV
The Autocrat of Russia possesses more power than any other man in the earth; but he cannot stop a sneeze. --Pudd'nhead Wilson's New Calendar.WAUGANIUI, December 3. A pleasant trip, yesterday, per Ballarat Fly. Four hours. I do not know the distance, but it must have been well along toward fifty miles. The Fly could have spun it out to eight hours and not discommoded me; for where there is comfort, and no need for hurry, speed is of no value--at least to me; and nothing that goes on wheels can be more comfortable, more satisfactory, than the New Zealand trains. Outside... Nonfictions - Post by : crazyjeyesy - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 2816

Following The Equator - Chapter XXXIV Following The Equator - Chapter XXXIV

Following The Equator - Chapter XXXIV
Let us not be too particular. It is better to have old second-hand diamonds than none at all. --Pudd'nhead Wilson's New Calendar.November 27. To-day we reached Gisborne, and anchored in a big bay; there was a heavy sea on, so we remained on board.We were a mile from shore; a little steam-tug put out from the land; she was an object of thrilling interest; she would climb to the summit of a billow, reel drunkenly there a moment, dim and gray in the driving storm of spindrift, then make a plunge like a diver and remain out of sight until one... Nonfictions - Post by : mischa_u - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 1590

Following The Equator - Chapter XXXIII Following The Equator - Chapter XXXIII

Following The Equator - Chapter XXXIII
Let us be grateful to Adam our benefactor. He cut us out of the "blessing of idleness," and won for us the "curse of labor." --Pudd'nhead Wilson's New Calendar.We soon reached the town of Nelson, and spent the most of the day there, visiting acquaintances and driving with them about the garden--the whole region is a garden, excepting the scene of the "Maungatapu Murders," of thirty years ago. That is a wild place--wild and lonely; an ideal place for a murder. It is at the base of a vast, rugged, densely timbered mountain. In the deep twilight of that forest solitude... Nonfictions - Post by : catbeach - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 3155

Following The Equator - Chapter XXXII Following The Equator - Chapter XXXII

Following The Equator - Chapter XXXII
The man with a new idea is a Crank until the idea succeeds. --Pudd'nhead Wilson's New Calendar.It was Junior England all the way to Christchurch--in fact, just a garden. And Christchurch is an English town, with an English-park annex, and a winding English brook just like the Avon--and named the Avon; but from a man, not from Shakespeare's river. Its grassy banks are bordered by the stateliest and most impressive weeping willows to be found in the world, I suppose. They continue the line of a great ancestor; they were grown from sprouts of the willow that sheltered Napoleon's grave in... Nonfictions - Post by : aletha - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 2283

Following The Equator - Chapter XXXI Following The Equator - Chapter XXXI

Following The Equator - Chapter XXXI
The spirit of wrath--not the words--is the sin; and the spirit of wrath is cursing. We begin to swear before we can talk. --Pudd'nhead Wilson's New Calendar.November 11. On the road. This train-express goes twenty and one-half miles an hour, schedule time; but it is fast enough, the outlook upon sea and land is so interesting, and the cars so comfortable. They are not English, and not American; they are the Swiss combination of the two. A narrow and railed porch along the side a person can walk up and down. A lavatory in each car. This is progress; this... Nonfictions - Post by : 111media - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 2593

Following The Equator - Chapter XXX Following The Equator - Chapter XXX

Following The Equator - Chapter XXX
Nature makes the locust with an appetite for crops; man would have made him with an appetite for sand. --Pudd'nhead Wilson's New Calendar.We spent part of an afternoon and a night at sea, and reached Bluff, in New Zealand, early in the morning. Bluff is at the bottom of the middle island, and is away down south, nearly forty-seven degrees below the equator. It lies as far south of the line as Quebec lies north of it, and the climates of the two should be alike; but for some reason or other it has not been so arranged. Quebec is hot... Nonfictions - Post by : Bassmaster - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 3146

Following The Equator - Chapter XXIX Following The Equator - Chapter XXIX

Following The Equator - Chapter XXIX
When people do not respect us we are sharply offended; yet deep down in his private heart no man much respects himself. --Pudd'nhead Wilson's New Calendar.Necessarily, the human interest is the first interest in the log-book of any country. The annals of Tasmania, in whose shadow we were sailing, are lurid with that feature. Tasmania was a convict-dump, in old times; this has been indicated in the account of the Conciliator reference is made to vain attempts of desperate convicts to win to permanent freedom, after escaping from Macquarrie Harbor and the "Gates of Hell." In the early days Tasmania... Nonfictions - Post by : ielliott - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 2600

Following The Equator - Chapter XXVIII Following The Equator - Chapter XXVIII

Following The Equator - Chapter XXVIII
Let us be thankful for the fools. But for them the rest of us could not succeed. --Pudd'nhead Wilson's New Calendar.The aphorism does really seem true: "Given the Circumstances, the Man will appear." But the man musn't appear ahead of time, or it will spoil everything. In Robinson's case the Moment had been approaching for a quarter of a century--and meantime the future Conciliator was tranquilly laying bricks in Hobart. When all other means had failed, the Moment had arrived, and the Bricklayer put down his trowel and came forward. Earlier he would have been jeered back to his trowel again.... Nonfictions - Post by : jrtrot - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 1605

Following The Equator - Chapter XXVII Following The Equator - Chapter XXVII

Following The Equator - Chapter XXVII
Man is the Only Animal that Blushes. Or needs to. --Pudd'nhead Wilson's New Calendar.The universal brotherhood of man is our most precious possession, what there is of it. --Pudd'nhead Wilson's New Calendar.FROM DIARY:November 1--noon. A fine day, a brilliant sun. Warm in the sun, cold in the shade--an icy breeze blowing out of the south. A solemn long swell rolling up northward. It comes from the South Pole, with nothing in the way to obstruct its march and tone its energy down. I have read somewhere that an acute observer among the early explorers--Cook? or Tasman?--accepted this majestic swell as trustworthy... Nonfictions - Post by : naz73 - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 1968

Following The Equator - Chapter XXVI Following The Equator - Chapter XXVI

Following The Equator - Chapter XXVI
There are people who can do all fine and heroic things but one! keep from telling their happinesses to the unhappy. --Pudd'nhead Wilson's New Calendar.After visits to Maryborough and some other Australian towns, we presently took passage for New Zealand. If it would not look too much like showing off, I would tell the reader where New Zealand is; for he is as I was; he thinks he knows. And he thinks he knows where Hertzegovina is; and how to pronounce pariah; and how to use the word unique without exposing himself to the derision of the dictionary. But in truth,... Nonfictions - Post by : bill_ferry - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 912

Following The Equator - Chapter XXV Following The Equator - Chapter XXV

Following The Equator - Chapter XXV
"Classic." A book which people praise and don't read. --Pudd'nhead Wilson's New Calendar.On the rail again--bound for Bendigo. From diary:October 23. Got up at 6, left at 7.30; soon reached Castlemaine, one of the rich gold-fields of the early days; waited several hours for a train; left at 3.40 and reached Bendigo in an hour. For comrade, a Catholic priest who was better than I was, but didn't seem to know it--a man full of graces of the heart, the mind, and the spirit; a lovable man. He will rise. He will be a bishop some day. Later an Archbishop. Later... Nonfictions - Post by : kmike - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 3375

Following The Equator - Chapter XXIV Following The Equator - Chapter XXIV

Following The Equator - Chapter XXIV
There is no such thing as "the Queen's English." The property has gone into the hands of a joint stock company and we own the bulk of the shares! --Pudd'nhead Wilson's New Calendar.Frequently, in Australia, one has cloud-effects of an unfamiliar sort. We had this kind of scenery, finely staged, all the way to Ballarat. Consequently we saw more sky than country on that journey. At one time a great stretch of the vault was densely flecked with wee ragged-edged flakes of painfully white cloud-stuff, all of one shape and size, and equidistant apart, with narrow cracks of adorable blue showing... Nonfictions - Post by : ?ric_Hamel - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 2022