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Chapters From My Autobiography - Chapter XII Chapters From My Autobiography - Chapter XII

Chapters From My Autobiography - Chapter XII
JANUARY 4, 1907.(_Dictated December 13, 1906._) As regards the coming American monarchy. It was before the Secretary of State had been heard from that the chairman of the banquet said:"In this time of unrest it is of great satisfaction that such a man as you, Mr. Root, is chief adviser of the President."Mr. Root then got up and in the most quiet and orderly manner touched off the successor to the San Francisco earthquake. As a result, the several State governments were well shaken up and considerably weakened. Mr. Root was prophesying. He was prophesying, and it seems to me that... Nonfictions - Post by : Tsnyder - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 3275

Chapters From My Autobiography - Chapter XI Chapters From My Autobiography - Chapter XI

Chapters From My Autobiography - Chapter XI
DECEMBER 21, 1906.(Sidenote: (1864.))(_Dictated in 1906._) In those early days duelling suddenly became a fashion in the new Territory of Nevada, and by 1864 everybody was anxious to have a chance in the new sport, mainly for the reason that he was not able to thoroughly respect himself so long as he had not killed or crippled somebody in a duel or been killed or crippled in one himself.At that time I had been serving as city editor on Mr. Goodman's Virginia City "Enterprise" for a matter of two years. I was twenty-nine years old. I was ambitious in several ways,... Nonfictions - Post by : Jaguar - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 2225

Chapters From My Autobiography - Chapter X Chapters From My Autobiography - Chapter X

Chapters From My Autobiography - Chapter X
DECEMBER 7, 1906.I was always heedless. I was born heedless; and therefore I was constantly, and quite unconsciously, committing breaches of the minor proprieties, which brought upon me humiliations which ought to have humiliated me but didn't, because I didn't know anything had happened. But Livy knew; and so the humiliations fell to her share, poor child, who had not earned them and did not deserve them. She always said I was the most difficult child she had. She was very sensitive about me. It distressed her to see me do heedless things which could bring me under criticism, and so... Nonfictions - Post by : sengchan - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 2570

Chapters From My Autobiography - Chapter IX Chapters From My Autobiography - Chapter IX

Chapters From My Autobiography - Chapter IX
NOVEMBER 16, 1906._From Susy's Biography_.Papa made arrangements to read at Vassar College the 1st of May, and I went with him. We went by way of New York City. Mamma went with us to New York and stayed two days to do some shopping. We started Tuesday, at 1/2 past two o'clock in the afternoon, and reached New York about 1/4 past six. Papa went right up to General Grants from the station and mamma and I went to the Everett House. Aunt Clara came to supper with us up in our room....We and Aunt Clara were going were going to... Nonfictions - Post by : slgrow - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 3434

Chapters From My Autobiography - Chapter VIII Chapters From My Autobiography - Chapter VIII

Chapters From My Autobiography - Chapter VIII
NOVEMBER 2, 1906.Susy's remark about my strong language troubles me, and I must go back to it. All through the first ten years of my married life I kept a constant and discreet watch upon my tongue while in the house, and went outside and to a distance when circumstances were too much for me and I was obliged to seek relief. I prized my wife's respect and approval above all the rest of the human race's respect and approval. I dreaded the day when she should discover that I was but a whited sepulchre partly freighted with suppressed language. I... Nonfictions - Post by : warp981 - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 1283

Chapters From My Autobiography - Chapter VII Chapters From My Autobiography - Chapter VII

Chapters From My Autobiography - Chapter VII
OCTOBER 19, 1906.When Susy was thirteen, and was a slender little maid with plaited tails of copper-tinged brown hair down her back, and was perhaps the busiest bee in the household hive, by reason of the manifold studies, health exercises and recreations she had to attend to, she secretly, and of her own motion, and out of love, added another task to her labors--the writing of a biography of me. She did this work in her bedroom at night, and kept her record hidden. After a little, the mother discovered it and filched it, and let me see it; then told... Nonfictions - Post by : LaneLester - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 2555

Chapters From My Autobiography - Chapter VI Chapters From My Autobiography - Chapter VI

Chapters From My Autobiography - Chapter VI
OCTOBER 5, 1906.To-morrow will be the thirty-sixth anniversary of our marriage. My wife passed from this life one year and eight months ago, in Florence, Italy, after an unbroken illness of twenty-two months' duration.I saw her first in the form of an ivory miniature in her brother Charley's stateroom in the steamer "Quaker City," in the Bay of Smyrna, in the summer of 1867, when she was in her twenty-second year. I saw her in the flesh for the first time in New York in the following December. She was slender and beautiful and girlish--and she was both girl and woman.... Nonfictions - Post by : shknoll1 - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 3253

Chapters From My Autobiography - Chapter V Chapters From My Autobiography - Chapter V

Chapters From My Autobiography - Chapter V
This is from this morning's paper:MARK TWAIN LETTER SOLD._Written to Thomas Nast, it Proposed a Joint Tour._A Mark Twain autograph letter brought $43 yesterday at the auction by the Merwin-Clayton Company of the library and correspondence of the late Thomas Nast, cartoonist. The letter is nine pages note-paper, is dated Hartford, Nov. 12, 1877, and it addressed to Nast. It reads in part as follows:Hartford, _Nov. 12_.MY DEAR NAST: I did not think I should ever stand on a platform again until the time was come for me to say I die innocent. But the same old offers keep arriving that... Nonfictions - Post by : pkeno07 - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 751

Chapters From My Autobiography - Chapter IV Chapters From My Autobiography - Chapter IV

Chapters From My Autobiography - Chapter IV
... But it was on a bench in Washington Square that I saw the most of Louis Stevenson. It was an outing that lasted an hour or more, and was very pleasant and sociable. I had come with him from his house I had been paying my respects to his family. His business in the Square was to absorb the sunshine. He was most scantily furnished with flesh, his clothes seemed to fall into hollows as if there might be nothing inside but the frame for a sculptor's statue. His long face and lank hair and dark complexion and musing... Nonfictions - Post by : waypoint - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 950

Chapters From My Autobiography - Chapter III Chapters From My Autobiography - Chapter III

Chapters From My Autobiography - Chapter III
... This was in 1849. I was fourteen years old, then. We were still living in Hannibal, Missouri, on the banks of the Mississippi, in the new "frame" house built by my father five years before. That is, some of us lived in the new part, the rest in the old part back of it--the "L." In the autumn my sister gave a party, and invited all the marriageable young people of the village. I was too young for this society, and was too bashful to mingle with young ladies, anyway, therefore I was not invited--at least not for the whole... Nonfictions - Post by : valhalla - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 2455

Chapters From My Autobiography - Chapter II Chapters From My Autobiography - Chapter II

Chapters From My Autobiography - Chapter II
SEPTEMBER 21, 1906.My experiences as an author began early in 1867. I came to New York from San Francisco in the first month of that year and presently Charles H. Webb, whom I had known in San Francisco as a reporter on _The Bulletin_, and afterward editor of _The Californian_, suggested that I publish a volume of sketches. I had but a slender reputation to publish it on, but I was charmed and excited by the suggestion and quite willing to venture it if some industrious person would save me the trouble of gathering the sketches together. I was loath to... Nonfictions - Post by : Brian_B - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 767

Chapters From My Autobiography - Chapter I Chapters From My Autobiography - Chapter I

Chapters From My Autobiography - Chapter I
Back of the Virginia Clemenses is a dim procession of ancestors stretching back to Noah's time. According to tradition, some of them were pirates and slavers in Elizabeth's time. But this is no discredit to them, for so were Drake and Hawkins and the others. It was a respectable trade, then, and monarchs were partners in it. In my time I have had desires to be a pirate myself. The reader--if he will look deep down in his secret heart, will find--but never mind what he will find there; I am not writing his Autobiography, but mine. Later, according to tradition,... Nonfictions - Post by : LaneLester - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 2683

Chapters From My Autobiography - PREFACE Chapters From My Autobiography - PREFACE

Chapters From My Autobiography - PREFACE
PREFATORY NOTE.Mr. Clemens began to write his autobiography many years ago, and he continues to add to it day by day. It was his original intention to permit no publication of his memoirs until after his death; but, after leaving "Pier No. 70," he concluded that a considerable portion might now suitably be given to the public. It is that portion, garnered from the quarter-million of words already written, which will appear in this REVIEW during the coming year. No part of the autobiography will be published in book form during the lifetime of the author.EDITOR N. A. R.INTRODUCTION.I intend that... Nonfictions - Post by : morisan - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 799

Following The Equator - CONCLUSION Following The Equator - CONCLUSION

Following The Equator - CONCLUSION
I have traveled more than anyone else, and I have noticed that even the angels speak English with an accent. --Pudd'nhead Wilson's New Calendar.I saw Table Rock, anyway--a majestic pile. It is 3,000 feet high. It is also 17,000 feet high. These figures may be relied upon. I got them in Cape Town from the two best-informed citizens, men who had made Table Rock the study of their lives. And I saw Table Bay, so named for its levelness. I saw the Castle--built by the Dutch East India Company three hundred years ago--where the Commanding General lives; I saw St. Simon's... Nonfictions - Post by : fostermom - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 2249

Following The Equator - Chapter LXIX Following The Equator - Chapter LXIX

Following The Equator - Chapter LXIX
The very ink with which all history is written is merely fluid prejudice. --Pudd'nhead Wilsons's New Calendar.There isn't a Parallel of Latitude but thinks it would have been the Equator if it had had its rights. --Pudd'nhead Wilson's New Calendar.Next to Mr. Rhodes, to me the most interesting convulsion of nature in South Africa was the diamond-crater. The Rand gold fields are a stupendous marvel, and they make all other gold fields small, but I was not a stranger to gold-mining; the veldt was a noble thing to see, but it was only another and lovelier variety of our Great Plains;... Nonfictions - Post by : BabyCat - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 788

Following The Equator - Chapter LXVIII Following The Equator - Chapter LXVIII

Following The Equator - Chapter LXVIII
None of us can have as many virtues as the fountain-pen, or half its cussedness; but we can try. --Pudd'nhead Wilson's New Calendar.The Duke of Fife has borne testimony that Mr. Rhodes deceived him. That is also what Mr. Rhodes did with the Reformers. He got them into trouble, and then stayed out himself. A judicious man. He has always been that. As to this there was a moment of doubt, once. It was when he was out on his last pirating expedition in the Matabele country. The cable shouted out that he had gone unarmed, to visit a party of... Nonfictions - Post by : Paul_Buckley - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 3076

Following The Equator - Chapter LXVII Following The Equator - Chapter LXVII

Following The Equator - Chapter LXVII
First catch your Boer, then kick him. --Pudd'nhead Wilson's New Calendar.Those latter days were days of bitter worry and trouble for the harassed Reformers.From Mrs. Hammond we learn that on the 31st (the day after Johannesburg heard of the invasion), "The Reform Committee repudiates Dr. Jameson's inroad."It also publishes its intention to adhere to the Manifesto.It also earnestly desires that the inhabitants shall refrain from overt acts against the Boer government.It also "distributes arms" at the Court House, and furnishes horses "to the newly-enrolled volunteers."It also brings a Transvaal flag into the committee-room, and the entire body swear allegiance to it... Nonfictions - Post by : youkon - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 2156

Following The Equator - Chapter LXVI Following The Equator - Chapter LXVI

Following The Equator - Chapter LXVI
Every one is a moon, and has a dark side which he never shows to anybody. --Pudd'nhead Wilson's New Calendar.When I scribbled in my note-book a year ago the paragraph which ends the preceding chapter, it was meant to indicate, in an extravagant form, two things: the conflicting nature of the information conveyed by the citizen to the stranger concerning South African politics, and the resulting confusion created in the stranger's mind thereby.But it does not seem so very extravagant now. Nothing could in that disturbed and excited time make South African politics clear or quite rational to the citizen of... Nonfictions - Post by : bigfoot123 - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 874

Following The Equator - Chapter LXV Following The Equator - Chapter LXV

Following The Equator - Chapter LXV
In statesmanship get the formalities right, never mind about the moralities. --Pudd'nhead Wilson's New Calendar.FROM DIARY:Royal Hotel. Comfortable, good table, good service of natives and Madrasis. Curious jumble of modern and ancient city and village, primitiveness and the other thing. Electric bells, but they don't ring. Asked why they didn't, the watchman in the office said he thought they must be out of order; he thought so because some of them rang, but most of them didn't. Wouldn't it be a good idea to put them in order? He hesitated--like one who isn't quite sure--then conceded the point.May 7. A bang... Nonfictions - Post by : goldfinger - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 693

Following The Equator - Chapter LXIV Following The Equator - Chapter LXIV

Following The Equator - Chapter LXIV
When your watch gets out of order you have choice of two things to do: throw it in the fire or take it to the watch-tinker. The former is the quickest. --Pudd'nhead Wilson's New Calendar.The Arundel Castle is the finest boat I have seen in these seas. She is thoroughly modern, and that statement covers a great deal of ground. She has the usual defect, the common defect, the universal defect, the defect that has never been missing from any ship that ever sailed--she has imperfect beds. Many ships have good beds, but no ship has very good ones. In the... Nonfictions - Post by : toppito - Date : April 2012 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 3430