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To E---- To E----

To E----
To E---- (1) Let Folly smile, to view the names Of thee and me, in Friendship twin'd; Yet Virtue will have greater claims To love, than rank with vice combin'd. And though unequal is _thy_ fate, Since title deck'd my higher birth; Yet envy not this gaudy state, _Thine_ is the pride of modest worth. Our _souls_ at least congenial meet, Nor can _thy_ lot _my_ rank disgrace; Our intercourse is not less sweet, Since worth of... Poems - Post by : gregw - Date : April 2010 - Author : Lord Byron - Read : 2799

On The Death Of A Young Lady, Cousin To The Author, And Very Dear To Him On The Death Of A Young Lady, Cousin To The Author, And Very Dear To Him

On The Death Of A Young Lady, Cousin To The Author, And Very Dear To Him
1. Hush'd are the winds, and still the evening gloom, Not e'en a zephyr wanders through the grove, Whilst I return to view my Margaret's tomb, And scatter flowers on the dust I love.2. Within this narrow cell reclines her clay, That clay once such animation beam'd; The King of Terrors seiz'd her as his prey; Not worth, nor beauty, have her life redeem'd.3. Oh! could that King of Terrors pity feel, Or Heaven reverse the dread decree of fate,... Poems - Post by : ferret - Date : April 2010 - Author : Lord Byron - Read : 1375

To D---- To D----

To D----
1. In thee, I fondly hop'd to clasp A friend, whom death alone could sever; Till envy, with malignant grasp, Detach'd thee from my breast for ever.2. True, she has forc'd thee from my _breast_, Yet, in my _heart_, thou keep'st thy seat; There, there, thine image still must rest, Until that heart shall cease to beat.3. And, when the grave restores her dead, When life again to dust is given, On _thy dear_ breast I'll lay my... Poems - Post by : finnour - Date : April 2010 - Author : Lord Byron - Read : 2024

To Caroline To Caroline

To Caroline
1. Think'st thou I saw thy beauteous eyes, Suffus'd in tears, implore to stay; And heard _unmov'd_ thy plenteous sighs, Which said far more than words can say? 2. Though keen the grief _thy_ tears exprest, When love and hope lay _both_ o'erthrown; Yet still, my girl, _this_ bleeding breast Throbb'd, with deep sorrow, as _thine own_.3. But, when our cheeks with anguish glow'd, When _thy_ sweet lips were join'd to mine; The tears that from _my_ eyelids flow'd... Poems - Post by : john_kennedy - Date : April 2010 - Author : Lord Byron - Read : 978

To Caroline (second Poem) To Caroline (second Poem)

To Caroline (second Poem)
1. You say you love, and yet your eye No symptom of that love conveys, You say you love, yet know not why, Your cheek no sign of love betrays.2. Ah! did that breast with ardour glow, With me alone it joy could know, Or feel with me the listless woe, Which racks my heart when far from thee.3. Whene'er we meet my blushes rise, And mantle through my purpled cheek, But yet no blush to mine replies, Nor... Poems - Post by : theboss - Date : April 2010 - Author : Lord Byron - Read : 2884

To Emma To Emma

To Emma
1. Since now the hour is come at last, When you must quit your anxious lover; Since now, our dream of bliss is past, One pang, my girl, and all is over. 2. Alas! that pang will be severe, Which bids us part to meet no more; Which tears me far from _one_ so dear, _Departing_ for a distant shore. 3. Well! we have pass'd some happy hours, And joy will mingle with our tears; When thinking on... Poems - Post by : tomseve - Date : April 2010 - Author : Lord Byron - Read : 1765

Fragments Of School Exercises: From The 'prometheus Vinctus' Of Aeschylus Fragments Of School Exercises: From The "prometheus Vinctus" Of Aeschylus

Fragments Of School Exercises: From The 'prometheus Vinctus' Of Aeschylus
(Greek: Maedam o panta nem_on, K.T.L_) Great Jove! to whose Almighty Throne Both Gods and mortals homage pay, Ne'er may my soul thy power disown, Thy dread behests ne'er disobey. Oft shall the sacred victim fall, In sea-girt Ocean's mossy hall; My voice shall raise no impious strain, 'Gainst him who rules the sky and azure main. ...... Poems - Post by : D.Newton - Date : April 2010 - Author : Lord Byron - Read : 3642

Lines Written In 'letters Of An Italian Nun And An English Gentleman' Lines Written In "letters Of An Italian Nun And An English Gentleman"

Lines Written In 'letters Of An Italian Nun And An English Gentleman'
(Lines written...English Gentleman, by J.J. Rousseau: (1) Founded on Facts") "Away, away,--your flattering arts May now betray some simpler hearts; And _you_ will _smile_ at their believing, And _they_ shall _weep_ at your deceiving." (Footnote 1: A second edition of this work, of which the title is, Letters, etc., translated from the French of Jean Jacques Rousseau, was published in London, in 1784. It is, probably, a literary forgery.)The EndLord Byron's poem: Lines written in "Letters of an Italian Nun and an English Gentleman"... Poems - Post by : wingit - Date : April 2010 - Author : Lord Byron - Read : 3259

Answer To The Foregoing, Addressed To Miss---- Answer To The Foregoing, Addressed To Miss----

Answer To The Foregoing, Addressed To Miss----
Dear simple girl, those flattering arts, (From which thou'dst guard frail female hearts,) Exist but in imagination, Mere phantoms of thine own creation; For he who views that witching grace, That perfect form, that lovely face, With eyes admiring, oh! believe me, He never wishes to deceive thee: Once in thy polish'd mirror glance Thou'lt there descry that elegance Which from our sex demands such praises, But envy in the other raises. Then he who tells thee of thy beauty, Believe me, only does his... Poems - Post by : paulj93 - Date : April 2010 - Author : Lord Byron - Read : 3341

On A Change Of Masters At A Great Public School On A Change Of Masters At A Great Public School

On A Change Of Masters At A Great Public School
(1) Where are those honours, IDA! once your own, When Probus fill'd your magisterial throne? As ancient Rome, fast falling to disgrace, Hail'd a Barbarian in her Caesar's place, So you, degenerate, share as hard a fate, And seat _Pomposus_ where your _Probus_ sate. Of narrow brain, yet of a narrower soul, Pomposus holds you in his harsh controul; Pomposus, by no social virtue sway'd, With florid jargon, and with vain parade; With noisy nonsense, and new-fangled rules, (Such as were ne'er before enforc'd in schools.)... Poems - Post by : tommy - Date : April 2010 - Author : Lord Byron - Read : 937

Epitaph On A Beloved Friend Epitaph On A Beloved Friend

Epitaph On A Beloved Friend
(Greek: Astaer prin men elampes eni tsuoisin hepsos.)(Plato's Epitaph (Epig. Graec., Jacobs, 1826, p. 309),quoted by Diog. Laertins.) Oh, Friend! for ever lov'd, for ever dear! What fruitless tears have bathed thy honour'd bier! What sighs re-echo'd to thy parting breath, Whilst thou wast struggling in the pangs of death! Could tears retard the tyrant in his course; Could sighs avert his dart's relentless force; Could youth and virtue claim a short delay, Or beauty charm the spectre from his prey; Thou still hadst liv'd to bless my aching sight,... Poems - Post by : carolinatraders - Date : April 2010 - Author : Lord Byron - Read : 894

Adrian's Address To His Soul When Dying Adrian's Address To His Soul When Dying

Adrian's Address To His Soul When Dying
Animula! vagula, Blandula, Hospes, comesque corporis, Quae nunc abibis in Loca Pallidula, rigida, nudula, Nec, ut soles, dabis Jocos?TRANSLATION. Ah! gentle, fleeting, wav'ring Sprite, Friend and associate of this clay! To what unknown region borne, Wilt thou, now, wing thy distant flight? No more with wonted humour gay, But pallid, cheerless, and forlorn.1806.The EndLord Byron's poem: Adrian's Address to his Soul when Dying... Poems - Post by : tgranum - Date : April 2010 - Author : Lord Byron - Read : 2969

When, To Their Airy Hall, My Fathers' Voice - A Fragment When, To Their Airy Hall, My Fathers' Voice - A Fragment

When, To Their Airy Hall, My Fathers' Voice - A Fragment
(1)When, to their airy hall, my Fathers' voiceShall call my spirit, joyful in their choice;When, pois'd upon the gale, my form shall ride,Or, dark in mist, descend the mountain's side;Oh! may my shade behold no sculptur'd urns,To mark the spot where earth to earth returns!No lengthen'd scroll, no praise-encumber'd stone;My _epitaph_ shall be my name alone: (2)If _that_ with honour fail to crown my clay,Oh! may no other fame my deeds repay!_That_, only _that_, shall single out the spot;By that remember'd, or with that forgot.1803.(Footnote 1: There is no heading in the Quarto.)(Footnote 2: In his will, drawn up in 1811,... Poems - Post by : mikegiving - Date : April 2010 - Author : Lord Byron - Read : 2643

To Caroline (third Poem) To Caroline (third Poem)

To Caroline (third Poem)
1. Oh! when shall the grave hide for ever my sorrow? Oh! when shall my soul wing her flight from this clay? The present is hell! and the coming to-morrow But brings, with new torture, the curse of to-day.2. From my eye flows no tear, from my lips flow no curses, I blast not the fiends who have hurl'd me from bliss; For poor is the soul which, bewailing, rehearses Its querulous grief, when in anguish like this3. Was my eye, 'stead of tears, with... Poems - Post by : immjason - Date : April 2010 - Author : Lord Byron - Read : 2206

To Caroline (fourth Poem) To Caroline (fourth Poem)

To Caroline (fourth Poem)
(1)1. When I hear you express an affection so warm, Ne'er think, my belov'd, that I do not believe; For your lip would the soul of suspicion disarm, And your eye beams a ray which can never deceive.2. Yet still, this fond bosom regrets, while adoring, That love, like the leaf, must fall into the sear, That Age will come on, when Remembrance, deploring, Contemplates the scenes of her youth, with a tear;3. That the time must arrive, when, no longer retaining Their... Poems - Post by : Igor_Gir - Date : April 2010 - Author : Lord Byron - Read : 3483

On A Distant View Of The Village And School Of Harrow On The Hill, 1806 On A Distant View Of The Village And School Of Harrow On The Hill, 1806

On A Distant View Of The Village And School Of Harrow On The Hill, 1806
Oh! mihi praeteritos referat si Jupiter annos.(1) VIRGIL.1. Ye scenes of my childhood, whose lov'd recollection Embitters the present, compar'd with the past; Where science first dawn'd on the powers of reflection, And friendships were form'd, too romantic to last; (2)2. Where fancy, yet, joys to retrace the resemblance Of comrades, in friendship and mischief allied; (3) How welcome to me your ne'er fading remembrance, Which rests in the bosom, though hope is deny'd!3. Again I revisit the... Poems - Post by : Emmanuel - Date : April 2010 - Author : Lord Byron - Read : 2765

Thoughts Suggested By A College Examination Thoughts Suggested By A College Examination

Thoughts Suggested By A College Examination
High in the midst, surrounded by his peers, Magnus (1) his ample front sublime uprears: (i) Plac'd on his chair of state, he seems a God, While Sophs (2) and Freshmen tremble at his nod; As all around sit wrapt in speechless gloom, (ii) _His_ voice, in thunder, shakes the sounding dome; Denouncing dire reproach to luckless fools, Unskill'd to plod in mathematic rules. Happy the youth! in Euclid's axioms tried, Though little vers'd in any art beside;. . . . . . . . . 10 Who, scarcely... Poems - Post by : DavidS - Date : April 2010 - Author : Lord Byron - Read : 2508

To Mary, On Receiving Her Picture To Mary, On Receiving Her Picture

To Mary, On Receiving Her Picture
(1)1. This faint resemblance of thy charms, (Though strong as mortal art could give,) My constant heart of fear disarms, Revives my hopes, and bids me live.2. Here, I can trace the locks of gold Which round thy snowy forehead wave; The cheeks which sprung from Beauty's mould, The lips, which made me 'Beauty's' slave.3. Here I can trace--ah, no! that eye, Whose azure floats in liquid fire, Must all the painter's art defy, And bid him... Poems - Post by : trulyers - Date : April 2010 - Author : Lord Byron - Read : 1219

On The Death Of Mr. Fox On The Death Of Mr. Fox

On The Death Of Mr. Fox
THE FOLLOWING ILLIBERAL IMPROMPTU APPEARED IN THE "MORNING POST." "Our Nation's foes lament on _Fox's_ death, But bless the hour, when PITT resign'd his breath: These feelings wide, let Sense and Truth unclue, We give the palm Justice points its due." TO WHICH THE AUTHOR OF THESE PIECES SENT THE FOLLOWING REPLY FOR INSERTION IN THE "MORNING CHRONICLE." Oh, factious viper! whose envenom'd tooth Would mangle, still, the dead, perverting truth; What, though our "nation's foes" lament the fate, With generous feeling, of the good and great; Shall dastard tongues essay... Poems - Post by : TestyEL - Date : April 2010 - Author : Lord Byron - Read : 3225

To A Lady Who Presented To The Author A Lock Of Hair Braided With His Own To A Lady Who Presented To The Author A Lock Of Hair Braided With His Own

To A Lady Who Presented To The Author A Lock Of Hair Braided With His Own
(1)These locks, which fondly thus entwine, In firmer chains our hearts confine, Than all th' unmeaning protestations Which swell with nonsense, love orations. Our love is fix'd, I think we've prov'd it; Nor time, nor place, nor art have mov'd it; Then wherefore should we sigh and whine, With groundless jealousy repine; With silly whims, and fancies frantic, Merely to make our love romantic? Why should you weep, like _Lydia Languish_, And fret with self-created anguish? Or doom the lover you have chosen, On winter nights to sigh... Poems - Post by : imsharons - Date : April 2010 - Author : Lord Byron - Read : 2556