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On This Day I Complete My Thirty-sixth Year On This Day I Complete My Thirty-sixth Year

On This Day I Complete My Thirty-sixth Year
On This Day I Complete My Thirty-sixth Year.(1) 1. 'T IS time this heart should be unmoved, Since others it hath ceased to move: Yet, though I cannot be beloved, Still let me love! 2. My days are... Poems - Post by : compumedia - Date : August 2011 - Author : Lord Byron - Read : 3821

Last Words On Greece Last Words On Greece

Last Words On Greece
WHAT are to me those honours or renown Past or to come, a new-born people's cry? Albeit for such I could despise a crown Of aught save laurel, or for such could die. I am a fool of passion, and a frown Of thine to me is as an adder's eye. To the poor bird whose pinion fluttering down Wafts unto death the breast it bore so high; Such... Poems - Post by : Michael_Lev_Ron - Date : August 2011 - Author : Lord Byron - Read : 3418

Song To The Suliotes Song To The Suliotes

Song To The Suliotes
1. UP to battle! Sons of Suli Up, and do your duty duly! There the wall--and there the Moat is: Bouwah!(1) Bouwah! Suliotes! There is booty--there is Beauty, Up my boys and do your duty. 2. By the sally and the rally Which defied the arms of Ali; By your own dear native Highlands, By your children in the islands, Up and charge, my Stratiotes,... Poems - Post by : opuavang - Date : August 2011 - Author : Lord Byron - Read : 4119

Journal In Cephalonia Journal In Cephalonia

Journal In Cephalonia
THE dead have been awakened--shall I sleep? The World's at war with tyrants--shall I crouch? The harvest's ripe--and shall I pause to reap? I slumber not; the thorn is in my Couch; Each day a trumpet soundeth in mine ear, Its echo in my heart----June 19, 1823.(The end)Lord Byron's poem: Journal In Cephalonia... Poems - Post by : directoris - Date : August 2011 - Author : Lord Byron - Read : 2872

The Conquest The Conquest

The Conquest
The Conquest.(1)THE Son of Love and Lord of War I sing; Him who bade England bow to Normandy, And left the name of Conqueror more than King To his unconquerable dynasty. Not fanned alone by Victory's fleeting wing, He reared his bold and brilliant throne on high; The Bastard kept, like lions, his prey fast, And Britain's bravest Victor was the last.March 8-9, 1823.FOOTNOTE:(1) (This fragment was found amongst Lord Byron's papers, after his... Poems - Post by : bossfreeguy - Date : August 2011 - Author : Lord Byron - Read : 2329

Lucietta. A Fragment Lucietta. A Fragment

Lucietta. A Fragment
LUCIETTA, my deary, That fairest of faces! Is made up of kisses; But, in love, oft the case is Even stranger than this is-- There's another, that's slyer, Who touches me nigher,-- A Witch, an intriguer, Whose manner and figure Now piques me, excites me, Torments and delights me-- _Cætera desunt_.(The end)Lord Byron's poem: Lucietta. A... Poems - Post by : elenzo - Date : August 2011 - Author : Lord Byron - Read : 1417

The New Vicar Of Bray The New Vicar Of Bray

The New Vicar Of Bray
1. DO you know Doctor Nott?(1) With "a crook in his lot," Who seven years since tried to dish up A neat Codi_cil_ To the Princess's Will,(2) Which made Dr. Nott _not_ a bishop. 2. So the Doctor being found A... Poems - Post by : esseryn - Date : August 2011 - Author : Lord Byron - Read : 1275

Napoleon's Snuff-box Napoleon's Snuff-box

Napoleon's Snuff-box
Napoleon's Snuff-box(1) LADY, accept the box a hero wore, In spite of all this elegiac stuff: Let not seven stanzas written by a bore, Prevent your Ladyship from taking snuff!1821. FOOTNOTES: (1) (Napoleon bequeathed to Lady Holland a snuff-box which had been given to him by the Pope for his clemency in sparing Rome. Lord Carlisle wrote eight (not seven) stanzas, urging her, as Byron told Medwin, to decline the gift, "for fear that horror and murder should jump out of the lid every time it is... Poems - Post by : miscreed - Date : August 2011 - Author : Lord Byron - Read : 2585

To Mr. Murray (for Orford And For Waldegrave) To Mr. Murray (for Orford And For Waldegrave)

To Mr. Murray (for Orford And For Waldegrave)
1. FOR Orford(1) and for Waldegrave(2) You give much more than me you _gave_; Which is not fairly to behave, My Murray! 2. Because if a live dog, 't is said, Be worth a lion fairly sped, A live lord must be worth _two_ dead, My Murray! 3.... Poems - Post by : Dave_Smith - Date : August 2011 - Author : Lord Byron - Read : 2611

John Keats John Keats

John Keats
John Keats.(1)WHO killed John Keats? "I," says the Quarterly, So savage and Tartarly; "'T was one of my feats." Who shot the arrow? "The poet-priest Milman (So ready to kill man) "Or Southey, or Barrow."July 30, 1821. FOOTNOTES:(1) (For Croker's "article" on Keats's _Endymion_ (_Quarterly Review_, April, 1818, vol. xix. pp. 204-208), see _Don Juan_, Canto XI. stanza lx. line 1, _Poetical Works_, 1902, vi.... Poems - Post by : tevinj - Date : August 2011 - Author : Lord Byron - Read : 1196

Bowles And Campbell Bowles And Campbell

Bowles And Campbell
To the air of "How now, Madam Flirt," in the _Beggar's Opera_.(1) BOWLES. "WHY, how now, saucy Tom? If you thus must ramble, I will publish some Remarks on Mister Campbell. Saucy Tom!"CAMPBELL. "WHY, how now, Billy Bowles? Sure the priest is maudlin! (_To the public_) How can you, d--n your souls! Listen to his twaddling?... Poems - Post by : paul_lee - Date : August 2011 - Author : Lord Byron - Read : 1280

Martial, Lib. I. Epig. I Martial, Lib. I. Epig. I

Martial, Lib. I. Epig. I
"Hic est, quem legis, ille, quem requiris, Toto notus in orbe Martialis," etc. HE, unto whom thou art so partial, Oh, reader! is the well-known Martial, The Epigrammatist: while living, Give him the fame thou would'st be giving; So shall he hear, and feel, and know it-- Post-obits rarely reach a poet.(The end)Lord Byron's poem: Martial, Lib. I. Epig. I... Poems - Post by : midibidi - Date : August 2011 - Author : Lord Byron - Read : 2965

On My Thirty-third Birthday On My Thirty-third Birthday

On My Thirty-third Birthday
January 22, 1821.(1) THROUGH Life's dull road, so dim and dirty, I have dragged to three-and-thirty. What have these years left to me? Nothing--except thirty-three.FOOTNOTES: (1) ("To-morrow is my birthday--that is to say, at twelve o' the clock, midnight; _i.e._ in twelve minutes I shall have completed thirty and three years of age!!! and I go to my bed with a heaviness of heart at having lived so long, and to so little purpose. * * * It is three minutes past twelve--''Tis the middle of night... Poems - Post by : Riley_Crayton - Date : August 2011 - Author : Lord Byron - Read : 967

Epigram On The Braziers' Address To Be Presented In Armour Epigram On The Braziers' Address To Be Presented In Armour

Epigram On The Braziers' Address To Be Presented In Armour
ON THE BRAZIERS' ADDRESS TO BE PRESENTED IN ARMOUR BY THE COMPANY TO QUEEN CAROLINE.(1) IT seems that the Braziers propose soon to pass An Address and to bear it themselves all in brass; A superfluous pageant, for by the Lord Harry! They'll _find_ they're going, much more than they carry.Or-- THE Braziers, it seems, are determined to pass An Address, and present it themselves all in brass:-- A superfluous {pageant/trouble} for, by the Lord Harry!... Poems - Post by : teamkatn - Date : August 2011 - Author : Lord Byron - Read : 736

The Charity Ball The Charity Ball

The Charity Ball
The Charity Ball.(1)WHAT matter the pangs of a husband and father, If his sorrows in exile be great or be small, So the Pharisee's glories around her she gather, And the saint patronises her "Charity Ball!" What matters--a heart which, though faulty, was feeling, Be driven to excesses which once could appal-- That the Sinner should suffer is only fair dealing, As the Saint keeps her charity back for "the Ball!"December 10,... Poems - Post by : shuke - Date : August 2011 - Author : Lord Byron - Read : 1022

To Penelope To Penelope

To Penelope
(1) THIS day, of all our days, has done The worst for me and you:-- 'T is just six years since we were one, And five since we were two.November 5, 1820.FOOTNOTES:(1) ("For the anniversary of January 2, 1821, I have a small grateful anticipation, which, in case of accident, I add."--Letter to Moore, November 5, 1820, _Letters_, 1891, v. 112.)(The end)Lord Byron's poem: To Penelope... Poems - Post by : doum3 - Date : August 2011 - Author : Lord Byron - Read : 994

Stanzas (when A Man Hath No Freedom To Fight For At Home) Stanzas (when A Man Hath No Freedom To Fight For At Home)

Stanzas (when A Man Hath No Freedom To Fight For At Home)
Stanzas.(1) WHEN a man hath no freedom to fight for at home, Let him combat for that of his neighbours; Let him think of the glories of Greece and of Rome, And get knocked on the head for his labours. To do good to Mankind is the chivalrous plan, And is always as nobly requited; Then battle for Freedom wherever you can, And, if not shot or hanged, you'll get knighted.November... Poems - Post by : David - Date : August 2011 - Author : Lord Byron - Read : 5387

A Volume Of Nonsense A Volume Of Nonsense

A Volume Of Nonsense
DEAR MURRAY,-- You ask for a "_Volume of Nonsense_," Have all of your authors exhausted their store? I thought you had published a good deal not long since. And doubtless the Squadron are ready with more. But on looking again, I perceive that the Species Of "Nonsense" you want must be purely "_facetious_;" And, as that is the case, you had best put to press... Poems - Post by : skyriders - Date : August 2011 - Author : Lord Byron - Read : 980

Lines Addressed By Lord Byron To Mr. Hobhouse On His Election For Westminster Lines Addressed By Lord Byron To Mr. Hobhouse On His Election For Westminster

Lines Addressed By Lord Byron To Mr. Hobhouse On His Election For Westminster
TO MR. HOBHOUSE ON HIS ELECTION FOR WESTMINSTER.(1) WOULD you go to the house by the true gate, Much faster than ever Whig Charley went; Let Parliament send you to Newgate, And Newgate will send you to Parliament.April 9, 1820.FOOTNOTES:(1) ("I send you 'a Song of Triumph,' by W. Botherby, Esq^re^ pricesixpence, on the election of J.C.H., Esqre., for Westminster (_not_ forpublication)."--Letter to Murray, April 9, 1820, _Letters_, 1901, v. 6.)(The end)Lord Byron's poem: Lines Addressed By Lord Byron To Mr. Hobhouse On His Election... Poems - Post by : reflextrading - Date : August 2011 - Author : Lord Byron - Read : 1516

My Boy Hobby O. My Boy Hobby O.

My Boy Hobby O.
(Another Version of "My Boy Hobbie O.") To the Editor of the Morning Post. Sir,--A copy of verses, to the tune of '_My boy Tammy_,' are repeated in literary circles, and said to be written by a Noble Lord of the highest poetical fame, upon his quondam friend and annotator. My memory does not enable me to repeat more than the first two verses quite accurately, but the humourous spirit of the Song may be gathered from these:-- 1. Why were you put in Lob's pond, My boy,... Poems - Post by : crashnburnuk - Date : August 2011 - Author : Lord Byron - Read : 1597