Full Online Books
BOOK CATEGORIES
Authors Authors Short Stories Short Stories Long Stories Long Stories Funny Stories Funny Stories Love Stories Love Stories Stories For Kids Stories For Kids Poems Poems Essays Essays Nonfictions Nonfictions Plays Plays Folktales Folktales Fairy Tales Fairy Tales Fables Fables Learning Kitchen Learning Kitchen
LINKS
Valid XHTML 1.0 Transitional Free Classified Website Without Registration Free Classified Website Daniel Company
Twitter Twitter Add book
donate
Full Online Book HomeAuthor Jules VernePage 1
Famous Authors (View All Authors)

The English At The North Pole: Part 1 Of The Adventures Of Captain Hatteras - Chapter 32. The Return The English At The North Pole: Part 1 Of The Adventures Of Captain Hatteras - Chapter 32. The Return

The English At The North Pole: Part 1 Of The Adventures Of Captain Hatteras - Chapter 32. The Return
CHAPTER XXXII. THE RETURNThe wind went down about six in the morning, and turning suddenly north cleared the clouds from the sky; the thermometer marked 33 degrees below zero. The first rays of the sun reached the horizon which they would gild a few days later. Hatteras came up to his two dejected companions, and said to them, in a low, sad voice: "We are still more than sixty miles from the spot indicated by Sir Edward Belcher. We have just enough provisions to allow us to get back to the brig. If we go on any further we shall meet... Long Stories - Post by : msmonline - Date : May 2012 - Author : Jules Verne - Read : 3060

The English At The North Pole: Part 1 Of The Adventures Of Captain Hatteras - Chapter 28. Preparations For Departure The English At The North Pole: Part 1 Of The Adventures Of Captain Hatteras - Chapter 28. Preparations For Departure

The English At The North Pole: Part 1 Of The Adventures Of Captain Hatteras - Chapter 28. Preparations For Departure
CHAPTER XXVIII. PREPARATIONS FOR DEPARTUREHatteras would not inform his crew of their situation, for if they had known that they had been dragged farther north they would very likely have given themselves up to the madness of despair. The captain had hidden his own emotions at his discovery. It was his first happy moment during the long months passed in struggling with the elements. He was a hundred and fifty miles farther north, scarcely eight degrees from the Pole! But he hid his delight so profoundly that even the doctor did not suspect it; he wondered at seeing an unwonted brilliancy... Long Stories - Post by : tlholley - Date : May 2012 - Author : Jules Verne - Read : 1657

The English At The North Pole: Part 1 Of The Adventures Of Captain Hatteras - Chapter 27. Christmas The English At The North Pole: Part 1 Of The Adventures Of Captain Hatteras - Chapter 27. Christmas

The English At The North Pole: Part 1 Of The Adventures Of Captain Hatteras - Chapter 27. Christmas
CHAPTER XXVII. CHRISTMASThere was then a movement of despair. The thought of death, and death from cold, appeared in all its horror; the last piece of coal burnt away as quickly as the rest, and the temperature of the room lowered sensibly. But Johnson went to fetch some lumps of the new fuel which the marine animals had furnished him with, and he stuffed it into the stove; he added some oakum, impregnated with frozen oil, and soon obtained enough heat. The smell of the grease was abominable, but how could they get rid of it? They were obliged to get... Long Stories - Post by : tlholley - Date : May 2012 - Author : Jules Verne - Read : 1747

The English At The North Pole: Part 1 Of The Adventures Of Captain Hatteras - Chapter 26. The Last Lump Of Coal The English At The North Pole: Part 1 Of The Adventures Of Captain Hatteras - Chapter 26. The Last Lump Of Coal

The English At The North Pole: Part 1 Of The Adventures Of Captain Hatteras - Chapter 26. The Last Lump Of Coal
CHAPTER XXVI. THE LAST LUMP OF COALIt seemed certain that no bears were to be had; several seals were killed during the days of the 4th, 5th, and 6th of November; then the wind changed, and the thermometer went up several degrees; but the snow-drifts began again with great violence. It became impossible to leave the vessel, and the greatest precaution was needed to keep out the damp. At the end of the week there were several bushels of ice in the condensers. The weather changed again on the 15th of November, and the thermometer, under the influence of certain atmospherical... Long Stories - Post by : tlholley - Date : May 2012 - Author : Jules Verne - Read : 2014

The English At The North Pole: Part 1 Of The Adventures Of Captain Hatteras - Chapter 25. An Old Fox The English At The North Pole: Part 1 Of The Adventures Of Captain Hatteras - Chapter 25. An Old Fox

The English At The North Pole: Part 1 Of The Adventures Of Captain Hatteras - Chapter 25. An Old Fox
CHAPTER XXV. AN OLD FOXThat day the thermometer went down to 3 degrees below zero. The weather was pretty calm, and the cold without breeze was bearable. Hatteras profited by the clearness of the atmosphere to reconnoitre the surrounding plains; he climbed one of the highest icebergs to the north, and could see nothing, as far as his telescope would let him, but ice-fields and icebergs. No land anywhere, but the image of chaos in its saddest aspect. He came back on board trying to calculate the probable duration of his captivity. The hunters, and amongst them the doctor, James Wall,... Long Stories - Post by : tlholley - Date : May 2012 - Author : Jules Verne - Read : 2208

The English At The North Pole: Part 1 Of The Adventures Of Captain Hatteras - Chapter 24. Preparations For Wintering The English At The North Pole: Part 1 Of The Adventures Of Captain Hatteras - Chapter 24. Preparations For Wintering

The English At The North Pole: Part 1 Of The Adventures Of Captain Hatteras - Chapter 24. Preparations For Wintering
CHAPTER XXIV. PREPARATIONS FOR WINTERINGThe southern hemisphere is colder in parallel latitudes than the northern hemisphere; but the temperature of the new continent is still 15 degrees below that of the other parts of the world; and in America the countries known under the name of the Frozen Pole are the most formidable. The average temperature of the year is 2 degrees below zero. Scientific men, and Dr. Clawbonny amongst them, explain the fact in the following way. According to them, the prevailing winds of the northern regions of America blow from the south-west; they come from the Pacific Ocean with... Long Stories - Post by : tlholley - Date : May 2012 - Author : Jules Verne - Read : 1134

The English At The North Pole: Part 1 Of The Adventures Of Captain Hatteras - Chapter 23. Attacked By Icebergs The English At The North Pole: Part 1 Of The Adventures Of Captain Hatteras - Chapter 23. Attacked By Icebergs

The English At The North Pole: Part 1 Of The Adventures Of Captain Hatteras - Chapter 23. Attacked By Icebergs
CHAPTER XXIII. ATTACKED BY ICEBERGSHatteras, after seeing to the anchoring of his ship, re-entered his cabin and examined his map attentively. He found himself in latitude 76 degrees 57 minutes and longitude 99 degrees 20 minutes--that is to say, at only three minutes from the 77th parallel. It was at this very spot that Sir Edward Belcher passed his first winter with the _Pioneer and the _Assistance_. It was thence that he organised his sledge and boat excursions. He discovered Table Isle, North Cornwall, Victoria Archipelago, and Belcher Channel. He reached the 78th parallel, and saw that the coast was depressed... Long Stories - Post by : tlholley - Date : May 2012 - Author : Jules Verne - Read : 1847

The English At The North Pole: Part 1 Of The Adventures Of Captain Hatteras - Chapter 22. Beginning Of Revolt The English At The North Pole: Part 1 Of The Adventures Of Captain Hatteras - Chapter 22. Beginning Of Revolt

The English At The North Pole: Part 1 Of The Adventures Of Captain Hatteras - Chapter 22. Beginning Of Revolt
CHAPTER XXII. BEGINNING OF REVOLTAt this unexpected command, the surprise was great on board the _Forward_. "Light the fires!" exclaimed some. "What with?" asked others. "When we've only two months' coal in the hold!" said Pen. "What shall we warm ourselves with in the winter?" asked Clifton. "We shall be obliged to burn the brig down to her water-line," answered Gripper. "And stuff the stove with the masts," added Warren. Shandon looked at Wall. The stupefied engineers hesitated to go down to the machine-room. "Did you hear me?" cried the captain in an irritated tone. Brunton made for the hatchway, but... Long Stories - Post by : tlholley - Date : May 2012 - Author : Jules Verne - Read : 811

The English At The North Pole: Part 1 Of The Adventures Of Captain Hatteras - Chapter 18. The Northern Route The English At The North Pole: Part 1 Of The Adventures Of Captain Hatteras - Chapter 18. The Northern Route

The English At The North Pole: Part 1 Of The Adventures Of Captain Hatteras - Chapter 18. The Northern Route
CHAPTER XVIII. THE NORTHERN ROUTEThe crew seemed to have returned to its habits of discipline and obedience. There was little fatiguing work to do, and they had a good deal of leisure. The temperature kept above freezing point, and it seemed as if the thaw had removed the great obstacles to navigation. Dick, now sociable and familiar, had made great friends with Dr. Clawbonny. But as in most friendships one friend has to give way to the other, it must be acknowledged it was not the dog. Dick did what he liked with the doctor, who obeyed him as if he... Long Stories - Post by : tlholley - Date : May 2012 - Author : Jules Verne - Read : 2975

The English At The North Pole: Part 1 Of The Adventures Of Captain Hatteras - Chapter 17. The Fate Of Sir John Franklin The English At The North Pole: Part 1 Of The Adventures Of Captain Hatteras - Chapter 17. The Fate Of Sir John Franklin

The English At The North Pole: Part 1 Of The Adventures Of Captain Hatteras - Chapter 17. The Fate Of Sir John Franklin
CHAPTER XVII. THE FATE OF SIR JOHN FRANKLINThe _Forward succeeded in cutting straight across James Ross Strait, but not without difficulty; the crew were obliged to work the saws and use petards, and they were worn out with fatigue. Happily the temperature was bearable, and thirty degrees higher than that experienced by James Ross at the same epoch. The thermometer marked thirty-four degrees. On Saturday they doubled Cape Felix at the northern extremity of King William's Land, one of the middle-sized isles of the northern seas. The crew there experienced a strong and painful sensation, and many a sad look was... Long Stories - Post by : tlholley - Date : May 2012 - Author : Jules Verne - Read : 3426

The English At The North Pole: Part 1 Of The Adventures Of Captain Hatteras - Chapter 16. The Magnetic Pole The English At The North Pole: Part 1 Of The Adventures Of Captain Hatteras - Chapter 16. The Magnetic Pole

The English At The North Pole: Part 1 Of The Adventures Of Captain Hatteras - Chapter 16. The Magnetic Pole
CHAPTER XVI. THE MAGNETIC POLEHatteras felt his anxiety increase as he neared the strait; the fate of his voyage depended upon it; up till now he had done more than his predecessors, the most fortunate of whom, McClintock, had taken fifteen months to reach this part of the Polar Seas; but it was little or nothing if he did not succeed in clearing Bellot Strait; he could not retrace his steps, and would be blocked up till the following year. He trusted the care of examining the coast to no one but himself; he mounted the crow's nest and passed several... Long Stories - Post by : tlholley - Date : May 2012 - Author : Jules Verne - Read : 3300

The English At The North Pole: Part 1 Of The Adventures Of Captain Hatteras - Chapter 15. The 'Forward' Driven Back South The English At The North Pole: Part 1 Of The Adventures Of Captain Hatteras - Chapter 15. The "Forward" Driven Back South

The English At The North Pole: Part 1 Of The Adventures Of Captain Hatteras - Chapter 15. The 'Forward' Driven Back South
CHAPTER XV. THE "FORWARD" DRIVEN BACK SOUTHThe weather cleared up towards evening, and land was clearly distinguished between Cape Sepping and Cape Clarence, which runs east, then south, and is joined to the coast on the west by a rather low neck of land. The sea at the entrance to Regent Strait was free from ice, with the exception of an impenetrable ice-bank, a little further than Port Leopold, which threatened to stop the _Forward in her north-westerly course. Hatteras was greatly vexed, but he did not show it; he was obliged to have recourse to petards in order to force... Long Stories - Post by : tlholley - Date : May 2012 - Author : Jules Verne - Read : 1768

The English At The North Pole: Part 1 Of The Adventures Of Captain Hatteras - Chapter 14. Expedition In Search Of Franklin The English At The North Pole: Part 1 Of The Adventures Of Captain Hatteras - Chapter 14. Expedition In Search Of Franklin

The English At The North Pole: Part 1 Of The Adventures Of Captain Hatteras - Chapter 14. Expedition In Search Of Franklin
CHAPTER XIV. EXPEDITION IN SEARCH OF FRANKLINOn Wednesday, the 23rd of May, the _Forward had again taken up her adventurous navigation, cleverly tacking amongst the packs and icebergs. Thanks to steam, that obedient force which so many of our Polar sea navigators have had to do without, she appeared to be playing in the midst of the moving rocks. She seemed to recognise the hand of an experienced master, and like a horse under an able rider, she obeyed the thought of her captain. The temperature rose. At six o'clock in the morning the thermometer marked twenty-six degrees, at six in... Long Stories - Post by : sidekick - Date : May 2012 - Author : Jules Verne - Read : 1741

The English At The North Pole: Part 1 Of The Adventures Of Captain Hatteras - Chapter 13. The Projects Of Hatteras The English At The North Pole: Part 1 Of The Adventures Of Captain Hatteras - Chapter 13. The Projects Of Hatteras

The English At The North Pole: Part 1 Of The Adventures Of Captain Hatteras - Chapter 13. The Projects Of Hatteras
CHAPTER XIII. THE PROJECTS OF HATTERASThe appearance of this bold personage was appreciated in different ways by the crew; part of them completely rallied round him, either from love of money or daring; others submitted because they could not help themselves, reserving their right to protest later on; besides, resistance to such a man seemed, for the present, difficult. Each man went back to his post. The 20th of May fell on a Sunday, and was consequently a day of rest for the crew. A council was held by the captain, composed of the officers, Shandon, Wall, Johnson, and the doctor.... Long Stories - Post by : sidekick - Date : May 2012 - Author : Jules Verne - Read : 1759

The English At The North Pole: Part 1 Of The Adventures Of Captain Hatteras - Chapter 12. Captain Hatteras The English At The North Pole: Part 1 Of The Adventures Of Captain Hatteras - Chapter 12. Captain Hatteras

The English At The North Pole: Part 1 Of The Adventures Of Captain Hatteras - Chapter 12. Captain Hatteras
CHAPTER XII. CAPTAIN HATTERASThe _Forward_, under steam, rapidly made its way between the ice-mountains and the icebergs. Johnson was at the wheel. Shandon, with his snow spectacles, was examining the horizon, but his joy was of short duration, for he soon discovered that the passage ended in a circus of mountains. However, he preferred going on, in spite of the difficulty, to going back. The dog followed the brig at a long distance, running along the plain, but if he lagged too far behind a singular whistle could be distinguished, which he immediately obeyed. The first time this whistle was heard... Long Stories - Post by : sidekick - Date : May 2012 - Author : Jules Verne - Read : 3484

The English At The North Pole: Part 1 Of The Adventures Of Captain Hatteras - Chapter 8. Gossip Of The Crew The English At The North Pole: Part 1 Of The Adventures Of Captain Hatteras - Chapter 8. Gossip Of The Crew

The English At The North Pole: Part 1 Of The Adventures Of Captain Hatteras - Chapter 8. Gossip Of The Crew
CHAPTER VIII. GOSSIP OF THE CREWHowever, the _Forward managed, by cunningly slipping into narrow passages, to gain a few more minutes north; but instead of avoiding the enemy, it was soon necessary to attack it. The ice-fields, several miles in extent, were getting nearer, and as these moving heaps often represent a pressure of more than ten millions of tons, it was necessary to give a wide berth to their embraces. The ice-saws were at once installed in the interior of the vessel, in such a manner as to facilitate immediate use of them. Part of the crew philosophically accepted their... Long Stories - Post by : sidekick - Date : May 2012 - Author : Jules Verne - Read : 2042

The English At The North Pole: Part 1 Of The Adventures Of Captain Hatteras - Chapter 7. Davis's Straits The English At The North Pole: Part 1 Of The Adventures Of Captain Hatteras - Chapter 7. Davis's Straits

The English At The North Pole: Part 1 Of The Adventures Of Captain Hatteras - Chapter 7. Davis's Straits
CHAPTER VII. DAVIS'S STRAITSDuring that day the _Forward cut out an easy road amongst the half-broken ice; the wind was good, but the temperature very low; the currents of air blowing across the ice-fields brought with them their penetrating cold. The night required the severest attention; the floating icebergs drew together in that narrow pass; a hundred at once were often counted on the horizon; they broke off from the elevated coasts under the teeth of the grinding waves and the influence of the spring season, in order to go and melt or to be swallowed up in the depths of... Long Stories - Post by : sidekick - Date : May 2012 - Author : Jules Verne - Read : 1524

The English At The North Pole: Part 1 Of The Adventures Of Captain Hatteras - Chapter 6. The Great Polar Current The English At The North Pole: Part 1 Of The Adventures Of Captain Hatteras - Chapter 6. The Great Polar Current

The English At The North Pole: Part 1 Of The Adventures Of Captain Hatteras - Chapter 6. The Great Polar Current
CHAPTER VI. THE GREAT POLAR CURRENTA short time after the flights of birds became more and more numerous. Petrels, puffins, and mates, inhabitants of those desolate quarters, signalled the approach of Greenland. The _Forward was rapidly nearing the north, leaving to her leeward a long line of black smoke. On Tuesday the 17th of April, about eleven o'clock in the morning, the ice-master signalled the first sight of the ice-blink; it was about twenty miles to the N.N.W. This glaring white strip was brilliantly lighted up, in spite of the presence of thick clouds in the neighbouring parts of the sky.... Long Stories - Post by : sidekick - Date : May 2012 - Author : Jules Verne - Read : 799

The English At The North Pole: Part 1 Of The Adventures Of Captain Hatteras - Chapter 5. Out At Sea The English At The North Pole: Part 1 Of The Adventures Of Captain Hatteras - Chapter 5. Out At Sea

The English At The North Pole: Part 1 Of The Adventures Of Captain Hatteras - Chapter 5. Out At Sea
CHAPTER V. OUT AT SEAThe wind was favourable, though it blew in April gales. The _Forward cut through the waves, and towards three o'clock crossed the mail steamer between Liverpool and the Isle of Man. The captain hailed from his deck the last adieu that the _Forward was destined to hear. At five o'clock the pilot left the command in the hands of Richard Shandon, the commander of the brig, and regained his cutter, which, turning round, soon disappeared on the south-west. Towards evening the brig doubled the Calf of Man at the southern extremity of the island. During the night... Long Stories - Post by : sidekick - Date : May 2012 - Author : Jules Verne - Read : 706

The English At The North Pole: Part 1 Of The Adventures Of Captain Hatteras - Chapter 4. Dog-Captain The English At The North Pole: Part 1 Of The Adventures Of Captain Hatteras - Chapter 4. Dog-Captain

The English At The North Pole: Part 1 Of The Adventures Of Captain Hatteras - Chapter 4. Dog-Captain
CHAPTER IV. DOG-CAPTAINThe day of departure arrived with the 5th of April. The admission of the doctor on board had given the crew more confidence. They knew that where the worthy doctor went they could follow. However, the sailors were still uneasy, and Shandon, fearing that some of them would desert, wished to be off. With the coast out of sight, they would make up their mind to the inevitable. Dr. Clawbonny's cabin was situated at the end of the poop, and occupied all the stern of the vessel. The captain's and mate's cabins gave upon deck. The captain's remained hermetically... Long Stories - Post by : sidekick - Date : May 2012 - Author : Jules Verne - Read : 1628