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No. 517 (death Of Sir Roger -- From The Spectator) No. 517 (death Of Sir Roger -- From The Spectator)

No. 517 (death Of Sir Roger -- From The Spectator)
We last Night received a Piece of ill News at our Club, which very sensibly afflicted every one of us. I question not but my Readers themselves will be troubled at the hearing of it. To keep them no longer in Suspense, Sir ROGER DE COVERLEY is dead. He departed this Life at his House in the Country, after a few Weeks' Sickness. Sir ANDREW FREEPORT has a Letter from one of his Correspondents in those Parts, that informs him the old Man caught a Cold at the County Sessions, as he was very warmly promoting an Address of his own... Essays - Post by : MLMAnswerMan - Date : October 2011 - Author : Joseph Addison - Read : 752

No. 315 (from The Spectator) No. 315 (from The Spectator)

No. 315 (from The Spectator)
No. 315 Saturday, March 1, 1712. Addison. Nec deus intersit, nisi dignus vindice nodus Inciderit. Hor.Horace advises a Poet to consider thoroughly the Nature and Force of his Genius. (1) Milton seems to have known perfectly well in his Strength lay, and has therefore chosen a Subject entirely conformable to those Talents, of which he was Master. As his Genius was wonderfully turned to the Sublime, his Subject is the noblest that could have entered into the Thoughts of Man. Every thing that is truly great and astonishing, has a place in it. The whole System... Essays - Post by : cgward - Date : September 2011 - Author : Joseph Addison - Read : 2137

No. 317 (from The Spectator) No. 317 (from The Spectator)

No. 317 (from The Spectator)
No. 317. Tuesday, March 4, 1712. Addison. --fruges consumere nati. Hor. Augustus, a few Moments before his Death, asked his Friends who stood about him, if they thought he had acted his Part well; and upon receiving such an Answer as was due to his extraordinary Merit, _Let me then, says he, go off the Stage with your Applause_; using the Expression with which the Roman Actors made their _Exit_ at the Conclusion of a Dramatick Piece. I could wish that Men, while they are in Health, would... Essays - Post by : bazac - Date : September 2011 - Author : Joseph Addison - Read : 2901

No. 321 (from The Spectator) No. 321 (from The Spectator)

No. 321 (from The Spectator)
No. 321 Saturday, March 8, 1712. Addison. Nec satis est pulchra esse poemata, dulcia sunto. Hor. Those, who know how many Volumes have been written on the Poems of Homer and Virgil, will easily pardon the Length of my Discourse upon Milton. The Paradise Lost is looked upon, by the best Judges, as the greatest Production, or at least the noblest Work of Genius in our Language, and therefore deserves to be set before an English Reader in its full Beauty. For this Reason, tho I have endeavoured to give a general Idea of its Graces and Imperfections in my... Essays - Post by : ngood - Date : September 2011 - Author : Joseph Addison - Read : 876

No. 323 (from The Spectator) No. 323 (from The Spectator)

No. 323 (from The Spectator)
No. 323 Tuesday, March 11, 1712. Addison. Modo Vir, modo Foemina. (1) Virg. The journal with which I presented my Reader on Tuesday last, has brought me in several Letters, with Accounts of many private Lives cast into that Form. I have the Rakes Journal, the Sots Journal, the Whoremasters Journal, and among several others a very curious Piece, entituled, The Journal of a Mohock. By these Instances I find that the Intention of my last Tuesdays Paper has been mistaken by many of my Readers. I did not design so much to expose Vice as Idleness, and aimed at those... Essays - Post by : PeterRumgay - Date : September 2011 - Author : Joseph Addison - Read : 4489

No. 327 (from The Spectator) No. 327 (from The Spectator)

No. 327 (from The Spectator)
No. 327Saturday, March 15, 1712. Addison. Major rerum mihi nascitur ordo. Virg. We were told in the foregoing Book how the evil Spirit practised upon Eve as she lay asleep, in order to inspire her with Thoughts of Vanity, Pride, and Ambition. The Author, who shews a wonderful Art throughout his whole Poem, in preparing the Reader for the several Occurrences that arise in it, founds upon the above-mention'd Circumstance, the first Part of the fifth Book. Adam upon his awaking finds Eve still asleep, with an unusual Discomposure in her Looks. The Posture in which he regards her, is describ'd... Essays - Post by : GuruBaron - Date : September 2011 - Author : Joseph Addison - Read : 844

No. 328 (from The Spectator) No. 328 (from The Spectator)

No. 328 (from The Spectator)
No. 328Monday, March 17, 1712. Addison. Nullum me a labore reclinat otium. Hor. Mr. SPECTATOR, As I believe this is the first Complaint that ever was made to you of this nature, so you are the first Person I ever could prevail upon my self to lay it before. When I tell you I have a healthy vigorous Constitution, a plentiful Estate, no inordinate Desires, and am married to a virtuous lovely Woman, who neither wants Wit nor Good-Nature, and by whom I have a numerous Offspring to perpetuate my Family, you will naturally conclude me a happy Man. But, notwithstanding... Essays - Post by : Zakaria_os - Date : September 2011 - Author : Joseph Addison - Read : 3033

No. 329 (sir Roger At Westminster Abbey -- From The Spectator) No. 329 (sir Roger At Westminster Abbey -- From The Spectator)

No. 329 (sir Roger At Westminster Abbey -- From The Spectator)
No. 329 Tuesday, March 18, 1712. Addison. Ire tamen restat, Numa quo devenit et Ancus. Hor. My friend Sir ROGER DE COVERLEY told me tother Night, that he had been reading my Paper upon Westminster Abby, in which, says he, there are a great many ingenious Fancies. He told me at the same time, that he observed I had promised another Paper upon the Tombs, and that he should be glad to go and see them with me, not having visited them since he had read History. I could not at first imagine how this came into the Knights Head, till... Essays - Post by : imported_n/a - Date : September 2011 - Author : Joseph Addison - Read : 5057

No. 333 (from The Spectator) No. 333 (from The Spectator)

No. 333 (from The Spectator)
No. 333 Saturday, March 22, 1712. Addison. --vocat in Certamina Divos. Virg. We are now entering upon the Sixth Book of Paradise Lost, in which the Poet describes the Battel of Angels; having raised his Readers Expectation, and prepared him for it by several Passages in the preceding Books. I omitted quoting these Passages in my Observations on the former Books, having purposely reserved them for the opening of this, the Subject of which gave occasion to them. The Authors Imagination was so inflam'd with this great Scene of Action, that wherever he speaks of it, he rises, if possible, above... Essays - Post by : Tazim - Date : September 2011 - Author : Joseph Addison - Read : 1801

No. 335 (sir Roger At The Play -- From The Spectator) No. 335 (sir Roger At The Play -- From The Spectator)

No. 335 (sir Roger At The Play -- From The Spectator)
No. 335 Tuesday, March 25, 1712. Addison. Respicere exemplar vitae morumque jubebo Doctum imitatorem, et veras hinc ducere voces. Hor.My Friend Sir ROGER DE COVERLEY, when we last met together at the Club, told me, that he had a great mind to see the new Tragedy (1) with me, assuring me at the same time, that he had not been at a Play these twenty Years. The last I saw, said Sir ROGER, was the Committee, which I should not have gone to neither, had not I been told before-hand that it was a good Church-of-England... Essays - Post by : lenmarren - Date : September 2011 - Author : Joseph Addison - Read : 2360

No. 338 (from The Spectator) No. 338 (from The Spectator)

No. 338 (from The Spectator)
No. 338Friday, March 28, 1712. (--Nil fuit unquam Tam dispar sibi. Hor. (1))I find the Tragedy of the Distrest Mother is publish'd today: The Author of the Prologue, I suppose, pleads an old Excuse I have read somewhere, of being dull with Design; and the Gentleman who writ the Epilogue (2) has, to my knowledge, so much of greater moment to value himself upon, that he will easily forgive me for publishing the Exceptions made against Gayety at the end of serious Entertainments, in the following Letter: I should be more unwilling to pardon him than any... Essays - Post by : ssherry - Date : September 2011 - Author : Joseph Addison - Read : 2762

No. 339 (from The Spectator) No. 339 (from The Spectator)

No. 339 (from The Spectator)
No. 339Saturday, March 29, 1712. Addison (--Ut his exordia primis Omnia, et ipse tener Mundi concreverit orbis. Tum durare solum et discludere Nerea ponto Coeperit, et rerum pauliatim sumere formas. Virg. (1))Longinus has observed, (2) that there may be a Loftiness in Sentiments there is no Passion, and brings Instances out of ancient Authors to support this his Opinion. The Pathetick, as that great Critick observes, may animate and inflame the Sublime, but is not essential to it. Accordingly, as he further remarks, we very often find that those who excel... Essays - Post by : kidrocks - Date : September 2011 - Author : Joseph Addison - Read : 2046

No. 343 (from The Spectator) No. 343 (from The Spectator)

No. 343 (from The Spectator)
No. 343Thursday, April 3, 1712. Addison. --Errat et illinc Huc venit, hinc illuc, et quoslibet occupat artus Spiritus: eque feris humana in corpora transit, Inque feras noster-- Pythag. ap. Ov.Will. Honeycomb, who loves to shew upon occasion all the little Learning he has picked up, told us yesterday at the Club, that he thought there might be a great deal said for the Transmigration of Souls, and that the Eastern Parts of the World believed in that Doctrine to this day. Sir Paul Rycaut, (1) says he, gives us an Account of several well-disposed Mahometans... Essays - Post by : Nick_Klein - Date : September 2011 - Author : Joseph Addison - Read : 1248

No. 345 (from The Spectator) No. 345 (from The Spectator)

No. 345 (from The Spectator)
No. 345Saturday, April 5, 1712. Addison. Sanctius his animal, mentisque capacius altae Deerat adhuc, et quod dominari in coetera posset, Natus homo est. Ov. Met.The Accounts which Raphael gives of the Battel of Angels, and the Creation of the World, have in them those Qualifications which the Criticks judge requisite to an Episode. They are nearly related to the principal Action, and have a just Connexion with the Fable. The eighth Book opens with a beautiful Description of the Impression which this Discourse of the Archangel made on our first Parent(s). Adam afterwards, by a very natural... Essays - Post by : David_Cash - Date : September 2011 - Author : Joseph Addison - Read : 3373

No. 349 (from The Spectator) No. 349 (from The Spectator)

No. 349 (from The Spectator)
No. 349 Thursday, April 10, 1712. Addison. Quos ille timorum Maximus haud urget lethi metus: inde ruendi In ferrum mens prona viris, animaeque capaces Mortis. Lucan. I am very much pleased with a Consolatory Letter of Phalaris, to one who had lost a Son that was a young Man of great Merit. The Thought with which he comforts the afflicted Father, is, to the best of my Memory, as follows; That he should consider Death had set a kind of Seal upon his Sons Character, and placed him out of the Reach... Essays - Post by : anders02 - Date : August 2011 - Author : Joseph Addison - Read : 3457

No. 351 (from The Spectator) No. 351 (from The Spectator)

No. 351 (from The Spectator)
No. 351Saturday, April 12, 1712. Addison. In te omnis domus inclinata recumbit. Virg. If we look into the three great Heroick Poems which have appeared in the World, we may observe that they are built upon very slight Foundations. Homer lived near 300 Years after the Trojan War; and, as the writing of History was not then in use among the Greeks, we may very well suppose, that the Tradition of Achilles and Ulysses had brought down but very few particulars to his Knowledge; though there is no question but he has wrought into his two Poems such of... Essays - Post by : biznewstoday - Date : August 2011 - Author : Joseph Addison - Read : 1111

No. 355 (from The Spectator) No. 355 (from The Spectator)

No. 355 (from The Spectator)
No. 355 Thursday, April 17, 1712. Addison. Non ego mordaci distrinxi carmine (quenquam. Ovid. (1)) I have been very often tempted to write Invectives upon those who have detracted from my Works, or spoken in derogation of my Person; but I look upon it as a particular Happiness, that I have always hindred my Resentments from proceeding to this extremity. I once had gone thro half a Satyr, but found so many Motions of Humanity rising in me towards the Persons whom I had severely treated, that I threw it into the Fire without ever finishing it. I have... Essays - Post by : kevinf - Date : August 2011 - Author : Joseph Addison - Read : 2316

No. 357 (from The Spectator) No. 357 (from The Spectator)

No. 357 (from The Spectator)
No. 357Saturday, April 19, 1712. Addison. (Quis talia fando Temperet a lachrymis? Virg.) (1) The Tenth Book of Paradise Lost has a greater variety of Persons in it than any other in the whole Poem. The Author upon the winding up of his Action introduces all those who had any Concern in it, and shews with great Beauty the Influence which it had upon each of them. It is like the last Act of a well-written Tragedy, in which all who had a part in it are generally drawn up before the Audience, and represented... Essays - Post by : neil_stelling - Date : August 2011 - Author : Joseph Addison - Read : 1037

No. 361 (from The Spectator) No. 361 (from The Spectator)

No. 361 (from The Spectator)
No. 361Thursday, April 24, 1712. Addison. Tartaream intendit vocem, qua protinus omnis Contremuit domus-- Virg.I have lately received the following Letter from a Country Gentleman. Mr. SPECTATOR, The Night before I left London I went to see a Play, called The Humorous Lieutenant. (1) Upon the Rising of the Curtain I was very much surprized with the great Consort of Cat-calls which was exhibited that Evening, and began to think with myself that I had made a Mistake, and gone to a Musick-Meeting, instead of the Play-house. It appeared indeed a little odd to me to see so many... Essays - Post by : taurean123 - Date : August 2011 - Author : Joseph Addison - Read : 2068

No. 363 (from The Spectator) No. 363 (from The Spectator)

No. 363 (from The Spectator)
No. 363Saturday, April 26, 1712. Addison. '--Crudelis ubique Luctus, ubique pavor, et plurima Mortis Imago.' Virg.Milton has shewn a wonderful Art in describing that variety of Passions which arise in our first Parents upon the Breach of the Commandment that had been given them. We see them gradually passing from the Triumph of their Guilt thro Remorse, Shame, Despair, Contrition, Prayer, and Hope, to a perfect and compleat Repentance. At the end of the tenth Book they are represented as prostrating themselves upon the Ground, and watering the Earth with their Tears: To which the Poet joins... Essays - Post by : Kwirth - Date : August 2011 - Author : Joseph Addison - Read : 2186