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The Art Of Political Lying The Art Of Political Lying

The Art Of Political Lying
We are told the devil is the father of lies, and was a liar from the beginning; so that, beyond contradiction, the invention is old: and, which is more, his first Essay of it was purely political, employed in undermining the authority of his prince, and seducing a third part of the subjects from their obedience: for which he was driven down from heaven (as Milton expresses it) he had been viceroy of a great western province; and forced to exercise his talent in inferior regions among other fallen spirits, poor or deluded men, whom he still daily tempts to... Essays - Post by : quantum_blast - Date : October 2011 - Author : Jonathan Swift - Read : 3405

Pulpit Eloquence ('the Tatler,' No. 66) Pulpit Eloquence ("the Tatler," No. 66)

Pulpit Eloquence ('the Tatler,' No. 66)
The subject of the discourse this evening was eloquence and graceful action. Lysander, who is something particular in his way of thinking and speaking, told us, "a man could not be eloquent without action; for the deportment of the body, the turn of the eye, and an apt sound to every word that is uttered, must all conspire to make an accomplished speaker. Action in one that speaks in public is the same thing as a good mien in ordinary life. Thus, as a certain insensibility in the countenance recommends a sentence of humour and jest, so it must be a... Essays - Post by : drdoctor - Date : October 2011 - Author : Jonathan Swift - Read : 999

A Simile On Our Want Of Silver, And The Only Way To Remedy It A Simile On Our Want Of Silver, And The Only Way To Remedy It

A Simile On Our Want Of Silver, And The Only Way To Remedy It
1725As when of old some sorceress threwO'er the moon's face a sable hue,To drive unseen her magic chair,At midnight, through the darken'd air;Wise people, who believed with reasonThat this eclipse was out of season,Affirm'd the moon was sick, and fellTo cure her by a counter spell.Ten thousand cymbals now begin,To rend the skies with brazen din;The cymbals' rattling sounds dispelThe cloud, and drive the hag to hell.The moon, deliver'd from her pain,Displays her silver face again.Note here, that in the chemic style,The moon is silver all this while. So (if my simile you minded,Which I confess is too long-winded)When late... Poems - Post by : worldmo - Date : August 2011 - Author : Jonathan Swift - Read : 2327

Epigram On Wood's Brass Money Epigram On Wood's Brass Money

Epigram On Wood's Brass Money
Carteret was welcomed to the shoreFirst with the brazen cannon's roar;To meet him next the soldier comes,With brazen trumps and brazen drums;Approaching near the town he hearsThe brazen bells salute his ears:But when Wood's brass began to sound,Guns, trumpets, drums, and bells, were drown'd.(The end)Jonathan Swift's poem: Epigram On Wood's Brass Money... Poems - Post by : freclik - Date : August 2011 - Author : Jonathan Swift - Read : 1327

Verses On The Revival Of The Order Of The Bath Verses On The Revival Of The Order Of The Bath

Verses On The Revival Of The Order Of The Bath
Verses On The Revival Of The Order Of The Bath, During Walpole's Administration(1), A. D. 1725Quoth King Robin, our ribbons I see are too fewOf St. Andrew's the green, and St. George's the blue.I must find out another of colour more gay,That will teach all my subjects with pride to obey.Though the exchequer be drain'd by prodigal donors,Yet the king ne'er exhausted his fountain of honours.Men of more wit than money our pensions will fit,And this will fit men of more money than wit.Thus my subjects with pleasure will obey my commands,Though as empty as Younge, and as saucy as SandesAnd... Poems - Post by : access2000 - Date : August 2011 - Author : Jonathan Swift - Read : 2630

Prometheus On Wood The Patentee's Irish Halfpence Prometheus On Wood The Patentee's Irish Halfpence

Prometheus On Wood The Patentee's Irish Halfpence
Prometheus(1) On Wood The Patentee's Irish Halfpence(2)1724When first the squire and tinker WoodGravely consulting Ireland's good,Together mingled in a massSmith's dust, and copper, lead, and brass;The mixture thus by chemic artUnited close in ev'ry part,In fillets roll'd, or cut in pieces,Appear'd like one continued species;And, by the forming engine struck,On all the same impression took. So, to confound this hated coin,All parties and religions join;Whigs, Tories, Trimmers, Hanoverians,Quakers, Conformists, Presbyterians,Scotch, Irish, English, French, unite,With equal interest, equal spiteTogether mingled in a lump,Do all in one opinion jump;And ev'ry one begins to findThe same impression on his mind. A strange... Poems - Post by : Hippoziggen - Date : August 2011 - Author : Jonathan Swift - Read : 2119

Verses Occasioned By Whitshed's Motto On His Coach Verses Occasioned By Whitshed's Motto On His Coach

Verses Occasioned By Whitshed's Motto On His Coach
Verses Occasioned By Whitshed's (1) Motto On His Coach. 1724 Libertas _et natale solum:_ (2)Fine words! I wonder where you stole 'em.Could nothing but thy chief reproachServe for a motto on thy coach?But let me now the words translate:_Natale solum_, my estate;My dear estate, how well I love it,My tenants, if you doubt, will prove it,They swear I am so kind and good,I hug them till I squeeze their blood. _Libertas_ bears a large import:First, how to swagger in a court;And, secondly, to show my furyAgainst an uncomplying jury;And, thirdly, 'tis a new invention,To favour Wood, and keep my... Poems - Post by : Paul_-_PBT - Date : August 2011 - Author : Jonathan Swift - Read : 2252

A Quibbling Elegy On Judge Boat A Quibbling Elegy On Judge Boat

A Quibbling Elegy On Judge Boat
1723To mournful ditties, Clio, change thy note,Since cruel fate has sunk our Justice Boat;Why should he sink nothing seem'd to pressHis lading little, and his ballast less?Tost in the waves of this tempestuous world,At length, his anchor fix'd and canvass furl'd,To Lazy-hill(1) retiring from his court,At his Ring's end(2) he founders in the port.With water(3) fill'd, he could no longer float,The common death of many a stronger boat.A post so fill'd on nature's laws entrenches:Benches on boats are placed, not boats on benches.And yet our Boat (how shall I reconcile it?)Was both a Boat, and in one sense a pilot.With... Poems - Post by : DukeOfURL - Date : August 2011 - Author : Jonathan Swift - Read : 3363

Upon The Horrid Plot Upon The Horrid Plot

Upon The Horrid Plot
DISCOVERED BY HARLEQUIN, THE BISHOP OF ROCHESTER'S FRENCH DOG,(1) IN A DIALOGUE BETWEEN A WHIG AND A TORY I ask'd a Whig the other night,How came this wicked plot to light?He answer'd, that a dog of lateInform'd a minister of state.Said I, from thence I nothing know;For are not all informers so?A villain who his friend betrays,We style him by no other phrase;And so a perjured dog denotesPorter, and Pendergast, and Oates,And forty others I could name. WHIG. But you must know this dog was lame. TORY. A weighty argument indeed!Your evidence was lame:--proceed:Come, help your lame dog... Poems - Post by : frontier - Date : August 2011 - Author : Jonathan Swift - Read : 1756

The Run Upon The Bankers The Run Upon The Bankers

The Run Upon The Bankers
The Run Upon the Bankers(1) The bold encroachers on the deep Gain by degrees huge tracts of land,Till Neptune, with one general sweep, Turns all again to barren strand.The multitude's capricious pranks Are said to represent the seas,Breaking the bankers and the banks, Resume their own whene'er they please.Money, the life-blood of the nation, Corrupts and stagnates in the veins,Unless a proper circulation Its motion and its heat maintains.Because 'tis lordly not to pay, Quakers and aldermen in state,Like peers, have levees every day Of duns attending at their gate.We want our... Poems - Post by : Iceman - Date : August 2011 - Author : Jonathan Swift - Read : 2466

An Excellent New Song On A Seditious Pamphlet An Excellent New Song On A Seditious Pamphlet

An Excellent New Song On A Seditious Pamphlet
An Excellent New Song On A Seditious Pamphlet(1) 1720-21To the tune of "Packington's Pound."Brocades, and damasks, and tabbies, and gauzes,Are, by Robert Ballantine, lately brought over,With forty things more: now hear what the law says,Whoe'er will not wear them is not the king's lover. Though a printer and Dean, Seditiously mean,Our true Irish hearts from Old England to wean,We'll buy English silks for our wives and our daughters,In spite of his deanship and journeyman Waters.In England the dead in woollen are clad, The Dean and his printer then let us cry fie on;To... Poems - Post by : IrishDitty - Date : August 2011 - Author : Jonathan Swift - Read : 811

Parody On The Speech Of Dr. Benjamin Pratt Parody On The Speech Of Dr. Benjamin Pratt

Parody On The Speech Of Dr. Benjamin Pratt
PARODY ON THE SPEECH OF DR. BENJAMIN PRATT,(1) PROVOST OF TRINITY COLLEGE TO THE PRINCE OF WALES Illustrious prince, we're come before ye,Who, more than in our founders, glory To be by you protected;Deign to descend and give us laws,For we are converts to your cause, From this day well-affected.(2)The noble view of your high meritsHas charm'd our thoughts and fix'd our spirits, With zeal so warm... Poems - Post by : ecash - Date : August 2011 - Author : Jonathan Swift - Read : 1857

A Satirical Elegy On The Death Of A Late Famous General A Satirical Elegy On The Death Of A Late Famous General

A Satirical Elegy On The Death Of A Late Famous General
(1)His Grace! impossible! what, dead!Of old age too, and in his bed!And could that mighty warrior fall,And so inglorious, after all?Well, since he's gone, no matter how,The last loud trump must wake him now;And, trust me, as the noise grows stronger,He'd wish to sleep a little longer.And could he be indeed so oldAs by the newspapers we're told?Threescore, I think, is pretty high;'Twas time in conscience he should die!This world he cumber'd long enough;He burnt his candle to the snuff;And that's the reason, some folks think,He left behind so great a stink.Behold his funeral appears,Nor widows' sighs, nor orphans' tears,Wont at... Poems - Post by : acreativetouch - Date : August 2011 - Author : Jonathan Swift - Read : 1838

A Tale Of A Nettle A Tale Of A Nettle

A Tale Of A Nettle
(1)A man with expense and infinite toil,By digging and dunging, ennobled his soil;There fruits of the best your taste did invite,And uniform order still courted the sight.No degenerate weeds the rich ground did produce,But all things afforded both beauty and use:Till from dunghill transplanted, while yet but a seed,A nettle rear'd up his inglorious head.The gard'ner would wisely have rooted him up,To stop the increase of a barbarous crop;But the master forbid him, and after the fashionOf foolish good nature, and blind moderation,Forbore him through pity, and chose as much rather,To ask him some questions first, how he came thither.Kind sir,... Poems - Post by : Indiana - Date : August 2011 - Author : Jonathan Swift - Read : 3021

A Poem, Occasioned By The Hangings In The Castle Of Dublin, In Which The Story Of A Poem, Occasioned By The Hangings In The Castle Of Dublin, In Which The Story Of

A Poem, Occasioned By The Hangings In The Castle Of Dublin, In Which The Story Of
A Poem, Occasioned By The Hangings In The Castle Of Dublin, In Which The Story Of Phaethon Is Expressed.Not asking or expecting aught, One day I went to view the court,Unbent and free from care or thought, Though thither fears and hopes resort.A piece of tapestry took my eye, The faded colours spoke it old;But wrought with curious imagery, The figures lively seem'd and bold.Here you might see the youth prevail, (In vain are eloquence and wit,)The boy persists, Apollo's frail; Wisdom to nature does submit.There mounts the eager charioteer; Soon from his seat... Poems - Post by : ToddS - Date : August 2011 - Author : Jonathan Swift - Read : 2825

A Poem On High Church A Poem On High Church

A Poem On High Church
High Church is undone,As sure as a gun, For old Peter Patch is departed;And Eyres and Delaune,And the rest of that spawn, Are tacking about broken-hearted.For strong Gill of Sarum,That _decoctum amarum_, Has prescribed a dose of cant-fail;Which will make them resignTheir flasks of French wine, And spice up their Nottingham ale.It purges the spleenOf dislike to the queen, And has one effect that is odder;When easement they use,They always will chuse The Conformity Bill for bumfodder.(The end)Jonathan Swift's poem: Poem On High Church... Poems - Post by : Garrett - Date : August 2011 - Author : Jonathan Swift - Read : 1555

On The Church's Danger On The Church's Danger

On The Church's Danger
Good Halifax and pious Wharton cry,The Church has vapours; there's no danger nigh.In those we love not, we no danger see,And were they hang'd, there would no danger be.But we must silent be, amidst our fears,And not believe our senses, but the Peers.So ravishers, that know no sense of shame,First stop her mouth, and then debauch the dame.(The end)Jonathan Swift's poem: On The Church's Danger... Poems - Post by : meleemel - Date : August 2011 - Author : Jonathan Swift - Read : 1561

The Fable Of The Bitches The Fable Of The Bitches

The Fable Of The Bitches
(1)WRITTEN IN THE YEAR 1715, ON AN ATTEMPT TO REPEAL THE TEST ACTA bitch, that was full pregnant grownBy all the dogs and curs in town,Finding her ripen'd time was come,Her litter teeming from her womb,Went here, and there, and everywhere,To find an easy place to lay her. At length to Music's house(2) she came,And begg'd like one both blind and lame;"My only friend, my dear," said she,"You see 'tis mere necessityHath sent me to your house to whelp:I die if you refuse your help." With fawning whine, and rueful tone,With artful sigh, and feigned groan,With couchant cringe, and... Poems - Post by : bclarkeco - Date : August 2011 - Author : Jonathan Swift - Read : 3229

In Sickness In Sickness

In Sickness
WRITTEN IN OCTOBER, 1714Soon after the author's coming to live in Ireland, upon the Queen's death.(1)--_Swift_.'Tis true--then why should I repineTo see my life so fast decline?But why obscurely here alone,Where I am neither loved nor known?My state of health none care to learn;My life is here no soul's concern:And those with whom I now converseWithout a tear will tend my hearse.Removed from kind Arbuthnot's aid,Who knows his art, but not his trade,Preferring his regard for meBefore his credit, or his fee.Some formal visits, looks, and words,What mere humanity affords,I meet perhaps from three or four,From whom I once expected more;Which... Poems - Post by : NicheProf - Date : August 2011 - Author : Jonathan Swift - Read : 2277

Dennis' Invitation To Steele; Horace, Book I, Ep. V Dennis' Invitation To Steele; Horace, Book I, Ep. V

Dennis' Invitation To Steele; Horace, Book I, Ep. V
HORACE, BOOK I, EP. V JOHN DENNIS, THE SHELTERING POET'S INVITATION TO RICHARD STEELE, THE SECLUDED PARTY-WRITER AND MEMBER, TO COME AND LIVE WITH HIM, IN THE MINT 1714 Fit to be bound up with "The Crisis"If thou canst lay aside a spendthrift's air,And condescend to feed on homely fare,Such as we minters, with ragouts unstored,Will, in defiance of the law, afford:Quit thy patrols with Toby's Christmas box,(1)And come to me at The Two Fighting Cocks;Since printing by subscription now is grownThe stalest, idlest cheat about the town;And ev'n Charles Gildon, who, a Papist bred,Has an alarm against that worship... Poems - Post by : rona1 - Date : August 2011 - Author : Jonathan Swift - Read : 580