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My Boyhood - My Father By Julian Burroughs (cont.) My Boyhood - My Father By Julian Burroughs (cont.)

My Boyhood - My Father By Julian Burroughs (cont.)
It was always a source of disappointment to Father that I did not write more, that I could not carry on his work--but this was more than he should have expected. He was an essayist, fired with a literary ambition that never faltered or grew dim for over sixty years. Once I wrote a brief introduction to a hunting story that won a prize in a sporting journal and I can never forget how pleased Father was with it--"It filled me with emotion," he said, "it brought tears to my eyes--write a whole piece like that and I'll send it to... Nonfictions - Post by : kippstips - Date : May 2012 - Author : John Burroughs - Read : 1708

My Boyhood - My Father By Julian Burroughs My Boyhood - My Father By Julian Burroughs

My Boyhood - My Father By Julian Burroughs
The earliest recollection that I have of Father was of one spring day when he was chasing and stoning the cat, our pet cat, who had caught a bluebird. I remember the fierce look in the cat's eyes, and her nose flattened over the back of blue, her nervously twitching tail, and the speed and strength with which Father pursued her, and the language he used, language that impressed me, at least, if not the cat, and which discredited the cat and her ancestry as well. As I remember it we rescued the bluebird, and there the picture fades. Just how... Nonfictions - Post by : kippstips - Date : May 2012 - Author : John Burroughs - Read : 2661

John James Audubon - Chapter 5 John James Audubon - Chapter 5

John James Audubon - Chapter 5
CHAPTER VAs a youth Audubon was an unwilling student of books; as a merchant and mill owner in Kentucky he was an unwilling man of business, but during his whole career, at all times and in all places, he was more than a willing student of ornithology--he was an eager and enthusiastic one. He brought to the pursuit of the birds, and to the study of open air life generally, the keen delight of the sportsman, united to the ardour of the artist moved by beautiful forms. He was not in the first instance a man of science, like Cuvier, or... Nonfictions - Post by : kippstips - Date : May 2012 - Author : John Burroughs - Read : 1668

John James Audubon - Chapter 4 John James Audubon - Chapter 4

John James Audubon - Chapter 4
CHAPTER IVAbout the very great merit of this work, there is but one opinion among competent judges. It is, indeed, a monument to the man's indomitable energy and perseverance, and it is a monument to the science of ornithology. The drawings of the birds are very spirited and life like, and their biographies copious, picturesque, and accurate, and, taken in connection with his many journals, they afford glimpses of the life of the country during the early part of the century, that are of very great interest and value. In writing the biography of the birds he wrote his autobiography as... Nonfictions - Post by : kippstips - Date : May 2012 - Author : John Burroughs - Read : 990

John James Audubon - Chapter 3 John James Audubon - Chapter 3

John James Audubon - Chapter 3
CHAPTER IIIFinally, Audubon gave up the struggle of trying to be a business man. He says: "I parted with every particle of property I had to my creditors, keeping only the clothes I wore on that day, my original drawings, and my gun, and without a dollar in my pocket, walked to Louisville alone." This he speaks of as the saddest of all his journeys--"the only time in my life when the wild turkeys that so often crossed my path, and the thousands of lesser birds that enlivened the woods and the prairies, all looked like enemies, and I turned my... Nonfictions - Post by : kippstips - Date : May 2012 - Author : John Burroughs - Read : 3414

John James Audubon - Chapter 2 John James Audubon - Chapter 2

John James Audubon - Chapter 2
CHAPTER IIAudubon was now eager to marry, but Mr. Bakewell advised him first to study the mercantile business. This he accordingly set out to do by entering as a clerk the commercial house of Benjamin Bakewell in New York, while his friend Rozier entered a French house in Philadelphia. But Audubon was not cut out for business; his first venture was in indigo, and cost him several hundred pounds. Rozier succeeded no better; his first speculation was a cargo of hams shipped to the West Indies which did not return one fifth of the cost. Audubon's want of business habits is... Nonfictions - Post by : kippstips - Date : May 2012 - Author : John Burroughs - Read : 851

John James Audubon - Chapter 1 John James Audubon - Chapter 1

John James Audubon - Chapter 1
CHAPTER IThere is a hopeless confusion as to certain important dates in Audubon's life. He was often careless and unreliable in his statements of matters of fact, which weakness during his lifetime often led to his being accused of falsehood. Thus he speaks of the "memorable battle of Valley Forge" and of two brothers of his, both officers in the French army, as having perished in the French Revolution, when he doubtless meant uncles. He had previously stated that his only two brothers died in infancy. He confessed that he had no head for mathematics, and he seems always to have... Nonfictions - Post by : kippstips - Date : May 2012 - Author : John Burroughs - Read : 681

John James Audubon - Preface John James Audubon - Preface

John James Audubon - Preface
The pioneer in American ornithology was Alexander Wilson, a Scotch weaver and poet, who emigrated to this country in 1794, and began the publication of his great work upon our birds in 1808. He figured and described three hundred and twenty species, fifty-six of them new to science. His death occurred in 1813, before the publication of his work had been completed. But the chief of American ornithologists was John James Audubon. Audubon did not begin where Wilson left off. He was also a pioneer, beginning his studies and drawings of the birds probably as early as Wilson did his, but... Nonfictions - Post by : kippstips - Date : May 2012 - Author : John Burroughs - Read : 3074

Camping & Tramping With Roosevelt Camping & Tramping With Roosevelt

Camping & Tramping With Roosevelt
INTRODUCTION This little volume really needs no introduction; the two sketches of which it is made explain and, I hope, justify themselves. But there is one phase of the President's many-sided character upon which I should like to lay especial emphasis, namely, his natural history bent and knowledge. Amid all his absorbing interests and masterful activities in other fields, his interest and his authority in practical natural history are by no means the least. I long ago had very direct proof of this statement. In some of my English sketches, following a visit to that island in 1882, I had, rather... Nonfictions - Post by : imported_n/a - Date : October 2011 - Author : John Burroughs - Read : 2020

A Snow-storm A Snow-storm

A Snow-storm
That is a striking line with which Emerson opens his beautiful poem of the Snow-Storm:-- "Announced by all the trumpets of the sky, Arrives the snow, and, driving o'er the fields, Seems nowhere to alight." One seems to see the clouds puffing their cheeks as they sound the charge of their white legions. But the line is more accurately descriptive of a rain-storm, as, in both summer and winter, rain is usually preceded by wind. Homer, describing a snow-storm in his time, says:-- "The winds are lulled." The preparations of a snow-storm are, as... Essays - Post by : hweetay - Date : October 2011 - Author : John Burroughs - Read : 2167

A Spring Relish A Spring Relish

A Spring Relish
It is a little remarkable how regularly severe and mild winters alternate in our climate for a series of years,--a feminine and a masculine one, as it were, almost invariably following each other. Every other season now for ten years the ice-gatherers on the river have been disappointed of a full harvest, and every other season the ice has formed from fifteen to twenty inches thick. From 1873 to 1884 there was no marked exception to this rule. But in the last-named year, when, according to the succession, a mild winter was due, the breed seemed to have got crossed, and... Essays - Post by : webtracker - Date : October 2011 - Author : John Burroughs - Read : 809

A Sharp Lookout A Sharp Lookout

A Sharp Lookout
One has only to sit down in the woods or fields, or by the shore of the river or lake, and nearly everything of interest will come round to him,--the birds, the animals, the insects; and presently, after his eye has got accustomed to the place, and to the light and shade, he will probably see some plant or flower that he had sought in vain for, and that is a pleasant surprise to him. So, on a large scale, the student and lover of nature has this advantage over people who gad up and down the world, seeking some novelty... Essays - Post by : Cy_Price - Date : October 2011 - Author : John Burroughs - Read : 2597

Emerson And His Journals Emerson And His Journals

Emerson And His Journals
I Emerson's fame as a writer and thinker was firmly established during his lifetime by the books he gave to the world. His Journals, published over a quarter of a century after his death, nearly or quite double the bulk of his writing, and while they do not rank in literary worth with his earlier works, they yet throw much light upon his life and character and it is a pleasure to me, in these dark and troublesome times,(1) and near the sun-down of my life, to go over them and point out in some detail their value and significance. (Footnote... Essays - Post by : enternow - Date : April 2011 - Author : John Burroughs - Read : 1011

Flies In Amber Flies In Amber

Flies In Amber
It has been the fashion among our younger writers to speak slightingly and flippantly of Emerson, referring to him as outworn, and as the apostle of the obvious. This view is more discreditable to the young people than is their criticism damaging to Emerson. It can make little difference to Emerson's fame, but it would be much more becoming in our young writers to garland his name with flowers than to utter these harsh verdicts. It is undoubtedly true that Emerson entered into and influenced the lives of more choice spirits, both men and women, during the past generation than did... Essays - Post by : wicked3dge - Date : April 2011 - Author : John Burroughs - Read : 2118

Another Word On Thoreau Another Word On Thoreau

Another Word On Thoreau
I After Emerson, the name of no New England man of letters keeps greener and fresher than that of Thoreau. A severe censor of his countrymen, and with few elements of popularity, yet the quality of his thought, the sincerity of his life, and the nearness and perennial interest of his themes, as well as his rare powers of literary expression, win recruits from each generation of readers. He does not grow stale any more than Walden Pond itself grows stale. He is an obstinate fact there in New England life and literature, and at the end of his first centennial... Essays - Post by : mmoneys - Date : April 2011 - Author : John Burroughs - Read : 1934

A Critical Glance Into Darwin A Critical Glance Into Darwin

A Critical Glance Into Darwin
I It is never safe to question Darwin's facts, but it is always safe to question any man's theories. It is with Darwin's theories that I am mainly concerned here. He has already been shorn of his selection doctrines as completely as Samson was shorn of his locks, but there are other phases of his life and teachings that invite discussion. The study of Darwin's works begets such an affection for the man, for the elements of character displayed on every page, that one is slow in convincing one's self that anything is wrong with his theories. There is danger that... Essays - Post by : hlpunltd - Date : April 2011 - Author : John Burroughs - Read : 1553

What Makes A Poem? What Makes A Poem?

What Makes A Poem?
Pope said that a middling poet was no poet at all. Middling things in art or in any field of human endeavor do not arouse our enthusiasm, and it is enthusiasm that fans the fires of life. There are all degrees of excellence, but in poetry one is always looking for the best. Pope himself holds a place in English literature which he could not hold had he been only a middling poet. He is not a poet of the highest order certainly, but a poet of the third or fourth order--the poet of the reason, the understanding, but not of... Essays - Post by : Brian_Harvard - Date : April 2011 - Author : John Burroughs - Read : 3375

Short Studies In Contrasts Short Studies In Contrasts

Short Studies In Contrasts
THE TRANSIENT AND THE PERMANENT The clouds are transient, but the sky is permanent. The petals of a flowering plant are transient, the leaves and fruit are less so, and the roots the least transient of all. The dew on the grass is transient, as is the frost of an autumn morning. The snows and the rains abide longer. The splendors of summer and sunrise and sunset soon pass, but the glory of the day lasts. The rainbow vanishes in a few moments, but the prismatic effect of the drops of rain is a law of optics. Colors fade while texture... Essays - Post by : Dusty13 - Date : April 2011 - Author : John Burroughs - Read : 3141

Day By Day Day By Day

Day By Day
We often hear it said of a man that he was born too early, or too late, but is it ever true? If he is behind his times, would he not have been behind at whatever period he had been born? If he is ahead of his times, is not the same thing true? In the vegetable world the early flowers and fruit blossoms are often cut off by the frost, but not so in the world of man. Babies are in order at any time. Is a poet, or a philosopher, ever born too late? or too early? If Emerson... Essays - Post by : scottmal - Date : April 2011 - Author : John Burroughs - Read : 2303

Gleanings Gleanings

Gleanings
I do not believe that one poet can or does efface another, as Arnold suggests. As every gas is a vacuum to every other gas, so every new poet is a vacuum to every other poet. Wordsworth told Arnold that for many years his poems did not bring him enough to buy his shoestrings. The reading public had to acquire a taste for him. Whitman said, "I am willing to wait for the growth of the taste of myself." A man who likes a poet of real worth is going to continue to like him, no matter what new man appears.... Essays - Post by : groundbreak - Date : April 2011 - Author : John Burroughs - Read : 2745