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Among My Books - Second Series - KEATS Among My Books - Second Series - KEATS

Among My Books - Second Series - KEATS
KEATSThere are few poets whose works contain slighter hints of their personal history than those of Keats; yet there are, perhaps, even fewer whose real lives, or rather the conditions upon which they lived, are more clearly traceable in what they have written. To write the life of a man was formerly understood to mean the cataloguing and placing of circumstances, of those things which stood about the life and were more or less related to it, but were not the life itself. But Biography from day to day holds dates cheaper and facts dearer. A man's life, so far as... Essays - Post by : Deftone - Date : April 2012 - Author : James Russell Lowell - Read : 2640

Among My Books - Second Series - MILTON. Continues 3 - Footnotes 358 - 383 Among My Books - Second Series - MILTON. Continues 3 - Footnotes 358 - 383

Among My Books - Second Series - MILTON. Continues 3 - Footnotes 358 - 383
MILTON. Continues 3 - Footnotes 358 - 383(358) The Life of John Milton: narrated in Connection with the Political, Ecclesiastical, and Literary History of his Time. By David Masterson, M.D., LL.D. Professor of Rhetoric and English Literature in the University of Edinburgh. Vols. I., II. 1638-1643. London and New York: Macmillan & Co. 1871. 8vo. pp. xii, 608.The Poetical Works of John Milton, edited, with Introduction, Notes and an Essay on Milton's English by David Masson, M.A., LL.D. Professor of Rhetoric and English Literature in the University of Edinburgh. 3 vols. 8vo. Macmillan & Co. 1874.(359) Book I. 562-567.(360) Ibid., 615-618.(361)... Essays - Post by : Pinky - Date : April 2012 - Author : James Russell Lowell - Read : 1885

Among My Books - Second Series - MILTON. Continues 2 Among My Books - Second Series - MILTON. Continues 2

Among My Books - Second Series - MILTON. Continues 2
MILTON. Continues 2There can be little doubt that the rhymes in the first passage cited were intentional, and perhaps they were so in the others; but Milton's ear has tolerated not a few perfectly rhyming couplets, and others in which the assonance almost becomes rhyme, certainly a fault in blankverse:--"From the Asian Kings (and Parthian among these), From India and the Golden Chersonese"; "That soon refreshed him wearied, and repaired What hunger, if aught hunger, had impaired"; "And will alike be punished, whether thou Reign or reign not, though to that gentle brow"; "Of pleasure, but all pleasure to destroy, Save... Essays - Post by : Terry_Doherty - Date : April 2012 - Author : James Russell Lowell - Read : 3122

Among My Books - Second Series - MILTON. Continues 1 Among My Books - Second Series - MILTON. Continues 1

Among My Books - Second Series - MILTON. Continues 1
MILTON. Continues 1Mr. Masson assures us that "there are touches in this description (as, for example, the _ordering of arms at the moment of halt, and without word of command) too exact and technical to have occurred to a mere civilian. Again, at the same review...."'He now prepared To speak; whereat their doubled ranks they bend From wing to wing, and half enclose him round With all his peers; _attention held them mute.'(360)"To the present day this is the very process, or one of the processes, when a commander wishes to address his men. They wheel inward and stand at 'attention.'"... Essays - Post by : musswt - Date : April 2012 - Author : James Russell Lowell - Read : 1453

Among My Books - Second Series - MILTON Among My Books - Second Series - MILTON

Among My Books - Second Series - MILTON
MILTONMILTON.(358)If the biographies of literary men are to assume the bulk which Mr. Masson is giving to that of Milton, their authors should send a phial of _elixir vitae with the first volume, that a purchaser might have some valid assurance of surviving to see the last. Mr. Masson has already occupied thirteen hundred and seventy-eight pages in getting Milton to his thirty-fifth year, and an interval of eleven years stretches between the dates of the first and second instalments of his published labors. As Milton's literary life properly begins at twenty-one, with the "Ode on the Nativity," and as by... Essays - Post by : sterlingmy - Date : April 2012 - Author : James Russell Lowell - Read : 1460

Among My Books - Second Series - WORDSWORTH. Continues 2 - Footnotes 323 - 357 Among My Books - Second Series - WORDSWORTH. Continues 2 - Footnotes 323 - 357

Among My Books - Second Series - WORDSWORTH. Continues 2 - Footnotes 323 - 357
WORDSWORTH. Continues 2 - Footnotes 323 - 357(323) "I pay many little visits to the family in the churchyard at Grasmere," writes James Dixon (an old servant of Wordsworth) to Crabb Robinson, with a simple, one might almost say canine pathos, thirteen years after his master's death. Wordsworth was always considerate and kind with his servants, Robinson tells us.(324) In the Prelude he attributes this consecreation to a sunrise seen (during a college vacation) as he walked homeward from some village festival where he had danced all night--"My heart was full; I made no vows, but vows Were then made for... Essays - Post by : Paul_Schlegel - Date : April 2012 - Author : James Russell Lowell - Read : 2733

Among My Books - Second Series - WORDSWORTH. Continues 1 Among My Books - Second Series - WORDSWORTH. Continues 1

Among My Books - Second Series - WORDSWORTH. Continues 1
WORDSWORTH. Continues 1An advertisement prefixed to the "Lyrical Ballads," as originally published in one volume, warned the reader that "they were written chiefly with a view to ascertain how far _the language of conversation in the middle and lower classes of society is adapted to the purposes of poetic pleasure." In his preface to the second edition, in two volumes, Wordsworth already found himself forced to shift his ground a little (perhaps in deference to the wider view and finer sense of Coleridge), and now says of the former volume that "it was published as an experiment which, I hoped, might... Essays - Post by : ABSTRACTOR - Date : April 2012 - Author : James Russell Lowell - Read : 1975

Among My Books - Second Series - WORDSWORTH Among My Books - Second Series - WORDSWORTH

Among My Books - Second Series - WORDSWORTH
WORDSWORTHA generation has now passed away since Wordsworth was laid with the family in the churchyard at Grasmere.(323) Perhaps it is hardly yet time to take a perfectly impartial measure of his value as a poet. To do this is especially hard for those who are old enough to remember the last shot which the foe was sullenly firing in that long war of critics which began when he published his manifesto as Pretender, and which came to a pause rather than end when they flung up their caps with the rest at his final coronation. Something of the intensity of... Essays - Post by : InfoProductLab - Date : April 2012 - Author : James Russell Lowell - Read : 2642

Among My Books - Second Series - SPENSER. Continues 3. Footnotes 263 - 322 Among My Books - Second Series - SPENSER. Continues 3. Footnotes 263 - 322

Among My Books - Second Series - SPENSER. Continues 3. Footnotes 263 - 322
SPENSER. Continues 3. Footnotes 263 - 322(263) Though always misapplied in quotation, as if he had used the word in that generalized meaning which is common now, but which could not without an impossible anachronism have been present to his mind. He meant merely freedom from prison.(264) In his "Defence of Poesy" he condemns the archaisms and provincialisms of the "Shepherd's Calendar."(265) "There is, as you must have heard Wordsworth point out, a language of pure, intelligible English, which was spoken in Chaucer's time, and is spoken in ours; equally understood then and now; and of which the Bible is the... Essays - Post by : Translink - Date : April 2012 - Author : James Russell Lowell - Read : 3338

Among My Books - Second Series - SPENSER. Continues 2 Among My Books - Second Series - SPENSER. Continues 2

Among My Books - Second Series - SPENSER. Continues 2
SPENSER. Continues 2The very greatest poets (and is there, after all, more than one of them?) have a way, I admit, of getting within our inmost consciousness and in a manner betraying us to ourselves. There is in Spenser a remoteness very different from this, but it is also a seclusion, and quite as agreeable, perhaps quite as wholesome in certain moods when we are glad to get away from ourselves and those importunate trifles which we gravely call the realities of life. In the warm Mediterranean of his mind everything"Suffers a sea change Into something rich and strange."He lifts everything,... Essays - Post by : patato - Date : April 2012 - Author : James Russell Lowell - Read : 2719

Among My Books - Second Series - SPENSER. Continues 1 Among My Books - Second Series - SPENSER. Continues 1

Among My Books - Second Series - SPENSER. Continues 1
SPENSER. Continues 1Spenser once more visited England, bringing with him three more books of the "Faery Queen," in 1595. He is supposed to have remained there during the two following years.(279)In 1594 he had been married to the lady celebrated in his somewhat artificial _amoretti_. By her he had four children. He was now at the height of his felicity; by universal acclaim the first poet of his age, and the one obstacle to his material advancement (if obstacle it was) had been put out of the way by the death of Lord Burleigh, August, 1598. In the next month he... Essays - Post by : Eliot_Proud - Date : April 2012 - Author : James Russell Lowell - Read : 3167

Among My Books - Second Series - SPENSER Among My Books - Second Series - SPENSER

Among My Books - Second Series - SPENSER
SPENSERChaucer had been in his grave one hundred and fifty years ere England had secreted choice material enough for the making of another great poet. The nature of men living together in societies, as of the individual man, seems to have its periodic ebbs and floods, its oscillations between the ideal and the matter-of-fact, so that the doubtful boundary line of shore between them is in one generation a hard sandy actuality strewn only with such remembrances of beauty as a dead sea-moss here and there, and in the next is whelmed with those lacelike curves of ever-gaining, ever-receding foam, and... Essays - Post by : jmenet - Date : April 2012 - Author : James Russell Lowell - Read : 2112

Among My Books - Second Series - DANTE. Continues 6 - Footnotes 1 - 262 Among My Books - Second Series - DANTE. Continues 6 - Footnotes 1 - 262

Among My Books - Second Series - DANTE. Continues 6 - Footnotes 1 - 262
DANTE. Continues 6 - Footnotes 1 - 262(1) The Shadow of Dante, being an Essay towards studying Himself, his World, and his Pilgrimage. By Maria Francesca Rossetti."Se Dio te lasci, lettor prender frutto Di tua lezione."Boston: Roberts Brothers. 1872. 8vo. pp. 296.(2) The Florentines should seem to have invented or re-invented banks, book-keeping by double entry, and bills of exchange. The last, by endowing Value with the gift of fern seed and enabling it to walk invisible, turned the flank of the baronial tariff-system and made the roads safe for the great liberalizer Commerce. This made Money omnipresent, and prepared the... Essays - Post by : peterwarrior - Date : April 2012 - Author : James Russell Lowell - Read : 3225

Among My Books - Second Series - DANTE. Continues 5 Among My Books - Second Series - DANTE. Continues 5

Among My Books - Second Series - DANTE. Continues 5
DANTE. Continues 5Rome was always the central point of Dante's speculation. A shadow of her old sovereignty was still left her in the primacy of the Church, to which unity of faith was essential. He accordingly has no sympathy with heretics of whatever kind. He puts the ex-troubadour Bishop of Marseilles, chief instigator of the horrors of Provence, in paradise.(227) The Church is infallible in spiritual matters, but this is an affair of outward discipline merely, and means the Church as a form of polity. Unity was Dante's leading doctrine, and therefore he puts Mahomet among the schismatics, not because he... Essays - Post by : Nifty - Date : April 2012 - Author : James Russell Lowell - Read : 2946

Among My Books - Second Series - DANTE. Continues 4 Among My Books - Second Series - DANTE. Continues 4

Among My Books - Second Series - DANTE. Continues 4
DANTE. Continues 4When did his soul catch a glimpse of that certainty in which "the mind that museth upon many things" can find assured rest? We have already said that we believe Dante's political opinions to have taken their final shape and the _De Monarchia to have been written before 1300.(173) That the revision of the _Vita Nuova was completed in that year seems probable from the last sonnet but one, which is addressed to pilgrims on their way to the Santa Veronica at Rome.(174) In this sonnet he still laments Beatrice as dead; he would make the pilgrims share his... Essays - Post by : alaqeada - Date : April 2012 - Author : James Russell Lowell - Read : 1024

Among My Books - Second Series - DANTE. Continues 3 Among My Books - Second Series - DANTE. Continues 3

Among My Books - Second Series - DANTE. Continues 3
DANTE. Continues 3If Dante's philosophy, on the one hand, was practical a guide for the conduct of life, it was, on the other, a much more transcendent thing, whose body was wisdom her soul love, and her efficient cause truth. It is a practice of wisdom from the mere love of it, for so we must interpret his _amoroso uso di sapienzia_, when we remember how he has said before(103) that "the love of wisdom for its delight or profit is not true love of wisdom." And this love must embrace knowledge in all its branches, for Dante is content with... Essays - Post by : greggy - Date : April 2012 - Author : James Russell Lowell - Read : 2376

Among My Books - Second Series - DANTE. Continues 2 Among My Books - Second Series - DANTE. Continues 2

Among My Books - Second Series - DANTE. Continues 2
DANTE. Continues 2We shall barely allude to the minor poems, full of grace and depth of mystic sentiment, and which would have given Dante a high place in the history of Italian literature, even had he written nothing else. They are so abstract, however, that without the extrinsic interest of having been written by the author of the _Commedia_, they would probably find few readers. All that is certainly known in regard to the _Commedia is that it was composed during the nineteen years which intervened between Dante's banishment and death. Attempts have been made to fix precisely the dates of... Essays - Post by : pgoodison - Date : April 2012 - Author : James Russell Lowell - Read : 1724

Among My Books - Second Series - DANTE. Continues 1 Among My Books - Second Series - DANTE. Continues 1

Among My Books - Second Series - DANTE. Continues 1
DANTE. Continues 1If these be not the words of Dante, what is internal evidence worth? The indomitably self-reliant man, loyal first of all to his most unpopular convictions (his very host, Guido, being a Guelph), puts his Ghibellinism (_jura monarchiae_) in the front. The man whose whole life, like that of selected souls always, had been a war fare, calls heaven another camp,--a better one, thank God! The wanderer of so many years speaks of his soul as a guest,--glad to be gone, doubtless. The exile, whose sharpest reproaches of Florence are always those of an outraged lover, finds it bitter... Essays - Post by : Kurtmon - Date : April 2012 - Author : James Russell Lowell - Read : 2812

Among My Books - Second Series - DANTE

To R.W. EMERSON Among My Books - Second Series - DANTE To R.W. EMERSON

Among My Books - Second Series - DANTE

To R.W. EMERSON
DANTETo R.W. EMERSONA love and honor which more than thirty years have deepened, though priceless to him they enrich, are of little import to one capable of inspiring them. Yet I cannot deny myself the pleasure of so far intruding on your reserve as at least to make public acknowledgment of the debt I can never repay. DANTE.(1)On the banks of a little river so shrunken by the suns of summer that it seems fast passing into a tradition, but swollen by the autumnal rains with an Italian suddenness of passion till the massy bridge shudders under the impatient heap of waters... Essays - Post by : Amber_Jalink - Date : April 2012 - Author : James Russell Lowell - Read : 2151

Among My Books - First Series - Footnotes 119 - 166 Among My Books - First Series - Footnotes 119 - 166

Among My Books - First Series - Footnotes 119 - 166
Footnotes 119 - 166(119) As where Ben Jonson is able to say,--"Man may securely sin, but safely never."(120) "Vulgarem locutionem anpellamus cam qua infantes adsuefiunt ab adsistentibus cum primitus distinguere voces incipiunt: vel, quod brevius dici potest, vulgarem locutionem asserimus _quam sine omni regula, nutricem imitantes accepimus_." Dantes, _de Vulg. Eloquio_, Lib I. cap. i.(121) Gray, himself a painful corrector, told Nicholls that "nothing was done so well as at the first concoction,"--adding, as a reason, "We think in words." Ben Jonson said, it was a pity Shakespeare had not blotted more, for that he sometimes wrote nonsense,--and cited in proof... Essays - Post by : Moriones - Date : April 2012 - Author : James Russell Lowell - Read : 3088