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The Illusions Of Writers In Verse The Illusions Of Writers In Verse

The Illusions Of Writers In Verse
Who would, with the awful severity of Plato, banish poets from the Republic? But it may be desirable that the Republic should not be banished from poets, which it seems to be when an inordinate passion for writing verses drives them from every active pursuit. There is no greater enemy to domestic quiet than a confirmed versifier; yet are most of them much to be pitied: it is the mediocre critics they first meet with who are the real origin of a populace of mediocre poets. A young writer of verses is sure to get flattered by those who affect to... Essays - Post by : dingo1 - Date : September 2011 - Author : Isaac Disraeli - Read : 2950

The Miseries Of Successful Authors The Miseries Of Successful Authors

The Miseries Of Successful Authors
HUME is an author so celebrated, a philosopher so serene, and a man so extremely amiable, if not fortunate, that we may be surprised to meet his name inscribed in a catalogue of literary calamities. Look into his literary life, and you will discover that the greater portion was mortified and angried; and that the stoic so lost his temper, that had not circumstances intervened which did not depend on himself, Hume had abandoned his country and changed his name! "The first success of most of my writings was not such as to be an object of vanity." His "Treatise of... Essays - Post by : HSPost - Date : September 2011 - Author : Isaac Disraeli - Read : 1211

A National Work Which Could Find No Patronage A National Work Which Could Find No Patronage

A National Work Which Could Find No Patronage
The author who is now before us is DE LOLME! I shall consider as an English author that foreigner, who flew to our country as the asylum of Europe, who composed a noble work on our Constitution, and, having imbibed its spirit, acquired even the language of a free country. I do not know an example in our literary history that so loudly accuses our tardy and phlegmatic feeling respecting authors, as the treatment De Lolme experienced in this country. His book on our Constitution still enters into the studies of an English patriot, and is not the worse for flattering... Essays - Post by : stristus - Date : September 2011 - Author : Isaac Disraeli - Read : 1707

Danger Incurred By Giving The Result Of Literary Inquiries Danger Incurred By Giving The Result Of Literary Inquiries

Danger Incurred By Giving The Result Of Literary Inquiries
An author occupies a critical situation, for, while he is presenting the world with the result of his profound studies and his honest inquiries, it may prove pernicious to himself. By it he may incur the risk of offending the higher powers, and witnessing his own days embittered. Liable, by his moderation or his discoveries, by his scruples or his assertions, by his adherence to truth, or by the curiosity of his speculations, to be persecuted by two opposite parties, even when the accusations of the one necessarily nullify the other; such an author will be fortunate to be permitted to... Essays - Post by : starblue - Date : September 2011 - Author : Isaac Disraeli - Read : 2620

The Rewards Of Oriental Students The Rewards Of Oriental Students

The Rewards Of Oriental Students
At a time when oriental studies were in their infancy in this country, SIMON OCKLEY, animated by the illustrious example of Pococke and the laborious diligence of Prideaux, devoted his life and his fortune to these novel researches, which necessarily involved both. With that enthusiasm which the ancient votary experienced, and with that patient suffering the modern martyr has endured, he pursued, till he accomplished, the useful object of his labours. He, perhaps, was the first who exhibited to us other heroes than those of Rome and Greece; sages as contemplative, and a people more magnificent even than the iron masters... Essays - Post by : Deb22056 - Date : September 2011 - Author : Isaac Disraeli - Read : 1806

Literary Disappointments Disordering The Intellect Literary Disappointments Disordering The Intellect

Literary Disappointments Disordering The Intellect
LELAND AND COLLINS. This awful calamity may be traced in the fate of LELAND and COLLINS: the one exhausted the finer faculties of his mind in the grandest views, and sunk under gigantic tasks; the other enthusiast sacrificed his reason and his happiness to his imagination. LELAND, the father of our antiquaries, was an accomplished scholar, and his ample mind had embraced the languages of antiquity, those of his own age, and the ancient ones of his own country: thus he held all human learning by its three vast chains. He travelled abroad; and he cultivated poetry with the ardour he... Essays - Post by : pearsonbrown - Date : September 2011 - Author : Isaac Disraeli - Read : 744

Genius The Dupe Of Its Passions Genius The Dupe Of Its Passions

Genius The Dupe Of Its Passions
POPE said that STEELE, though he led a careless and vicious life, had nevertheless a love and reverence for virtue. The life of Steele was not that of a retired scholar; hence his moral character becomes more instructive. He was one of those whose hearts are the dupes of their imaginations, and who are hurried through life by the most despotic volition. He always preferred his caprices to his interests; or, according to his own notion, very ingenious, but not a little absurd, "he was always of the humour of preferring the state of his mind to that of his fortune."... Essays - Post by : gsheiner - Date : September 2011 - Author : Isaac Disraeli - Read : 689

Genius And Erudition The Victims Of Immoderate Vanity Genius And Erudition The Victims Of Immoderate Vanity

Genius And Erudition The Victims Of Immoderate Vanity
The name of TOLAND is more familiar than his character, yet his literary portrait has great singularity; he must be classed among the "Authors by Profession," an honour secured by near fifty publications; and we shall discover that he aimed to combine with the literary character one peculiarly his own.(1) With higher talents and more learning than have been conceded to him, there ran in his mind an original vein of thinking. Yet his whole life exhibits in how small a degree great intellectual powers, when scattered through all the forms which Vanity suggests, will contribute to an author's social comforts,... Essays - Post by : castlebrake - Date : September 2011 - Author : Isaac Disraeli - Read : 3274

A Voluminous Author Without Judgment A Voluminous Author Without Judgment

A Voluminous Author Without Judgment
Vast erudition, without the tact of good sense, in a voluminous author, what a calamity! for to such a mind no subject can present itself on which he is unprepared to write, and none at the same time on which he can ever write reasonably. The name and the works of WILLIAM PRYNNE have often come under the eye of the reader; but it is even now difficult to discover his real character; for Prynne stood so completely insulated amid all parties, that he was ridiculed by his friends, and execrated by his enemies. The exuberance of his fertile pen, the... Essays - Post by : totalnet - Date : September 2011 - Author : Isaac Disraeli - Read : 841

Undue Severity Of Criticism Undue Severity Of Criticism

Undue Severity Of Criticism
DR. KENRICK.--SCOTT OF AMWELL. We have witnessed the malignant influence of illiberal criticism, not only on literary men, but over literature itself, since it is the actual cause of suppressing works which lie neglected, though completed by their authors. The arts of literary condemnation, as they may be practised by men of wit and arrogance, are well known; and it is much less difficult than it is criminal, to scare the modest man of learning, and to rack the man of genius, in that bright vision of authorship sometimes indulged in the calm of their studies--a generous emotion to inspire a... Essays - Post by : rvlawrence - Date : September 2011 - Author : Isaac Disraeli - Read : 2816

Literary Hatred Exhibiting A Conspiracy Against An Author Literary Hatred Exhibiting A Conspiracy Against An Author

Literary Hatred Exhibiting A Conspiracy Against An Author
In the peaceful walks of literature we are startled at discovering genius with the mind, and, if we conceive the instrument it guides to be a stiletto, with the hand of an assassin--irascible, vindictive, armed with indiscriminate satire, never pardoning the merit of rival genius, but fastening on it throughout life, till, in the moral retribution of human nature, these very passions, by their ungratified cravings, have tended to annihilate the being who fostered them. These passions among literary men are with none more inextinguishable than among provincial writers.--Their bad feelings are concentrated by their local contraction. The proximity of men... Essays - Post by : pss2040 - Date : September 2011 - Author : Isaac Disraeli - Read : 2618

Literary Ridicule Illustrated By Some Account Of A Literary Satire Literary Ridicule Illustrated By Some Account Of A Literary Satire

Literary Ridicule Illustrated By Some Account Of A Literary Satire
RIDICULE may be considered as a species of eloquence; it has all its vehemence, all its exaggeration, all its power of diminution; it is irresistible! Its business is not with truth, but with its appearance; and it is this similitude, in perpetual comparison with the original, which, raising contempt, produces the ridiculous. There is nothing real in ridicule; the more exquisite, the more it borrows from the imagination. When directed towards an individual, by preserving a unity of character in all its parts, it produces a fictitious personage, so modelled on the prototype, that we know not to distinguish the true... Essays - Post by : dead0eye - Date : September 2011 - Author : Isaac Disraeli - Read : 3463

The Indiscretion Of An Historian Thomas Carte The Indiscretion Of An Historian Thomas Carte

The Indiscretion Of An Historian Thomas Carte
"CARTE," says Mr. Hallam, "is the most exact historian we have;" and Daines Barrington prefers his authority to that of any other, and many other writers confirm this opinion. Yet had this historian been an ordinary compiler, he could not have incurred a more mortifying fate; for he was compelled to retail in shilling numbers that invaluable history which we have only learned of late times to appreciate, and which was the laborious fruits of self-devotion. Carte was the first of our historians who had the sagacity and the fortitude to ascertain where the true sources of our history lie. He... Essays - Post by : KennyMc - Date : September 2011 - Author : Isaac Disraeli - Read : 1231

The Life Of An Authoress The Life Of An Authoress

The Life Of An Authoress
Of all the sorrows in which the female character may participate, there are few more affecting than those of an authoress;--often insulated and unprotected in society--with all the sensibility of the sex, encountering miseries which break the spirits of men; with the repugnance arising from that delicacy which trembles when it quits its retirement. My acquaintance with an unfortunate lady of the name of ELIZA RYVES, was casual and interrupted; yet I witnessed the bitterness of "hope deferred, which maketh the heart sick." She sunk, by the slow wastings of grief, into a grave which probably does not record the name... Essays - Post by : sblackburn - Date : September 2011 - Author : Isaac Disraeli - Read : 3506

The Miseries Of The First English Commentator The Miseries Of The First English Commentator

The Miseries Of The First English Commentator
DR. ZACHARY GREY, the editor of "Hudibras," is the father of our modern commentators.(1) His case is rather peculiar; I know not whether the father, by an odd anticipation, was doomed to suffer for the sins of his children, or whether his own have been visited on the third generation; it is certain that never was an author more overpowered by the attacks he received from the light and indiscriminating shafts of ignorant wits. He was ridiculed and abused for having assisted us to comprehend the wit of an author, which, without that aid, at this day would have been nearly... Essays - Post by : brevi - Date : September 2011 - Author : Isaac Disraeli - Read : 2533

The Despair Of Young Poets The Despair Of Young Poets

The Despair Of Young Poets
WILLIAM PATTISON was a young poet who perished in his twentieth year; his character and his fate resemble those of Chatterton. He was one more child of that family of genius, whose passions, like the torch, kindle but to consume themselves. The youth of Pattison was that of a poet. Many become irrecoverably poets by local influence; and Beattie could hardly have thrown his "Minstrel" into a more poetical solitude than the singular spot which was haunted by our young bard. His first misfortune was that of having an anti-poetical parent; his next was that of having discovered a spot which... Essays - Post by : jeremy - Date : September 2011 - Author : Isaac Disraeli - Read : 1387

Laborious Authors Laborious Authors

Laborious Authors
This is one of the groans of old BURTON over his laborious work, when he is anticipating the reception it is like to meet with, and personates his objectors. He says:-- "This is a thinge of meere industrie--a collection without wit or invention--a very toy! So men are valued!--their labours vilified by fellowes of no worth themselves, as things of nought; who could not have done as much." There is, indeed, a class of authors who are liable to forfeit all claims to genius, whatever their genius may be--these are the laborious writers of voluminous works; but they are farther subject... Essays - Post by : ollan - Date : September 2011 - Author : Isaac Disraeli - Read : 3540

Literary Scotchmen Literary Scotchmen

Literary Scotchmen
What literary emigrations from the North of young men of genius, seduced by a romantic passion for literary fame, and lured by the golden prospects which the happier genius of some of their own countrymen opened on them. A volume might be written on literary Scotchmen, who have perished immaturely in this metropolis; little known, and slightly connected, they have dropped away among us, and scarcely left a vestige in the wrecks of their genius. Among them some authors may be discovered who might have ranked, perhaps, in the first classes of our literature. I shall select four out of as... Essays - Post by : agreement - Date : September 2011 - Author : Isaac Disraeli - Read : 1824

The Maladies Of Authors The Maladies Of Authors

The Maladies Of Authors
The practice of every art subjects the artist to some particular inconvenience, usually inflicting some malady on that member which has been over-wrought by excess: nature abused, pursues man into his most secret corners, and avenges herself. In the athletic exercises of the ancient Gymnasium, the pugilists were observed to become lean from their hips downwards, while the superior parts of their bodies, which they over-exercised, were prodigiously swollen; on the contrary, the racers were meagre upwards, while their feet acquired an unnatural dimension. The secret source of life seems to be carried forwards to those parts which are making the... Essays - Post by : jaepee - Date : September 2011 - Author : Isaac Disraeli - Read : 2932

Disappointed Genius Takes A Fatal Direction By Its Abuse Disappointed Genius Takes A Fatal Direction By Its Abuse

Disappointed Genius Takes A Fatal Direction By Its Abuse
How the moral and literary character are reciprocally influenced, may be traced in the character of a personage peculiarly apposite to these inquiries. This worthy of literature is ORATOR HENLEY, who is rather known traditionally than historically.(1) He is so overwhelmed with the echoed satire of Pope, and his own extravagant conduct for many years, that I should not care to extricate him, had I not discovered a feature in the character of Henley not yet drawn, and constituting no inferior calamity among authors. Henley stands in his "gilt tub" in the Dunciad; and a portrait of him hangs in the... Essays - Post by : Ace_Of_Shirts - Date : September 2011 - Author : Isaac Disraeli - Read : 1234