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Modeste Mignon - Chapter 17. A Third Suitor Modeste Mignon - Chapter 17. A Third Suitor

Modeste Mignon - Chapter 17. A Third Suitor
CHAPTER XVII. A THIRD SUITOR"Those two young men," said Madame Latournelle, on the Saturday evening, "have no idea how many spies they have on their tracks. We are eight in all, on the watch." "Don't say two young men, wife; say three!" cried little Latournelle, looking round him. "Gobenheim is not here, so I can speak out." Modeste raised her head, and everybody, imitating Modeste, raised theirs and looked at the notary. "Yes, a third lover--and he is something like a lover--offers himself as a candidate." "Bah!" exclaimed the colonel. "I speak of no less a person," said Latournelle, pompously, "than... Long Stories - Post by : McKinley - Date : May 2012 - Author : Honore De Balzac - Read : 1753

Modeste Mignon - Chapter 13. A Full-Length Portrait Of Monsieur De La Briere Modeste Mignon - Chapter 13. A Full-Length Portrait Of Monsieur De La Briere

Modeste Mignon - Chapter 13. A Full-Length Portrait Of Monsieur De La Briere
CHAPTER XIII. A FULL-LENGTH PORTRAIT OF MONSIEUR DE LA BRIEREIs there in the life of man a more delightful moment than that of a first rendezvous? Are the sensations then hidden at the bottom of our hearts and finding their first expression ever renewed? Can we feel again the nameless pleasures that we felt when, like Ernest de La Briere, we looked up our sharpest razors, our finest shirt, an irreproachable collar, and our best clothes? We deify the garments associated with that all-supreme moment. We weave within us poetic fancies quite equal to those of the woman; and the day... Long Stories - Post by : McKinley - Date : May 2012 - Author : Honore De Balzac - Read : 2586

Modeste Mignon - Chapter 12. A Declaration Of Love,--Set To Music Modeste Mignon - Chapter 12. A Declaration Of Love,--Set To Music

Modeste Mignon - Chapter 12. A Declaration Of Love,--Set To Music
CHAPTER XII. A DECLARATION OF LOVE,--SET TO MUSICAt this moment Modeste, happy as she was in the return of her father, was, nevertheless, pacing her room disconsolate as Perrette on seeing her eggs broken. She had hoped her father would bring back a much larger fortune than Dumay had mentioned. Nothing could satisfy her new-found ambition on behalf of her poet less than at least half the six millions she had talked of in her second letter. Trebly agitated by her two joys and the grief caused by her comparative poverty, she seated herself at the piano, that confidant of so... Long Stories - Post by : McKinley - Date : May 2012 - Author : Honore De Balzac - Read : 1034

Modeste Mignon - Chapter 11. What Comes Of Correspondence Modeste Mignon - Chapter 11. What Comes Of Correspondence

Modeste Mignon - Chapter 11. What Comes Of Correspondence
CHAPTER XI. WHAT COMES OF CORRESPONDENCEThe foregoing letters seemed very original to the persons from whom the author of the "Comedy of Human Life" obtained them; but their interest in this duel, this crossing of pens between two minds, may not be shared. For every hundred readers, eighty might weary of the battle. The respect due to the majority in every nation under a constitutional government, leads us, therefore, to suppress eleven other letters exchanged between Ernest and Modeste during the month of September. If, later on, some flattering majority should arise to claim them, let us hope that we can... Long Stories - Post by : McKinley - Date : May 2012 - Author : Honore De Balzac - Read : 3121

Modeste Mignon - Chapter 10. The Marriage Of Souls Modeste Mignon - Chapter 10. The Marriage Of Souls

Modeste Mignon - Chapter 10. The Marriage Of Souls
CHAPTER X. THE MARRIAGE OF SOULS To Monsieur de Canalis: My Friend,--Your letter gives me as much pain as pleasure. But perhaps some day we shall find nothing but pleasure in writing to each other. Understand me thoroughly. The soul speaks to God and asks him for many things; he is mute. I seek to obtain in you the answers that God does not make to me. Cannot the friendship of Mademoiselle de Gournay and Montaigne be revived in us? Do you not remember the household of Sismonde de Sismondi in Geneva? The most lovely home ever known, as I... Long Stories - Post by : jptia - Date : May 2012 - Author : Honore De Balzac - Read : 3065

Modeste Mignon - Chapter 9. The Power Of The Unseen Modeste Mignon - Chapter 9. The Power Of The Unseen

Modeste Mignon - Chapter 9. The Power Of The Unseen
CHAPTER IX. THE POWER OF THE UNSEEN To Monsieur de Canalis: My friend,--Suffer me to give you that name,--you have delighted me; I would not have you other than you are in this letter, the first--oh, may it not be the last! Who but a poet could have excused and understood a young girl so delicately? I wish to speak with the sincerity that dictated the first lines of your letter. And first, let me say that most fortunately you do not know me. I can joyfully assure you than I am neither that hideous Mademoiselle Vilquin nor the very... Long Stories - Post by : jptia - Date : May 2012 - Author : Honore De Balzac - Read : 2158

Modeste Mignon - Chapter 8. Blade To Blade Modeste Mignon - Chapter 8. Blade To Blade

Modeste Mignon - Chapter 8. Blade To Blade
CHAPTER VIII. BLADE TO BLADE To Monsieur de Canalis: Monsieur,--You are certainly a great poet, and you are something more,--an honest man. After showing such loyal frankness to a young girl who was stepping to the verge of an abyss, have you enough left to answer without hypocrisy or evasion the following question? Would you have written the letter I now hold in answer to mine, --would your ideas, your language have been the same,--had some one whispered in your ear (what may prove true), Mademoiselle O. d'Este M. has six millions and does intend to have a dunce for... Long Stories - Post by : jptia - Date : May 2012 - Author : Honore De Balzac - Read : 3521

Modeste Mignon - Chapter 7. A Poet Of The Angelic School Modeste Mignon - Chapter 7. A Poet Of The Angelic School

Modeste Mignon - Chapter 7. A Poet Of The Angelic School
CHAPTER VII. A POET OF THE ANGELIC SCHOOLAll young girls, romantic or otherwise, can imagine the impatience in which Modeste lived for the next few days. The air was full of tongues of fire. The trees were like a plumage. She was not conscious of a body; she hovered in space, the earth melted away under her feet. Full of admiration for the post-office, she followed her little sheet of paper on its way; she was happy, as we all are happy at twenty years of age, in the first exercise of our will. She was possessed, as in the middle... Long Stories - Post by : jptia - Date : May 2012 - Author : Honore De Balzac - Read : 3074

Modeste Mignon - Chapter 3. Preliminaries Modeste Mignon - Chapter 3. Preliminaries

Modeste Mignon - Chapter 3. Preliminaries
CHAPTER III. PRELIMINARIESJean Francois Bernard Dumay, born at Vannes, started as a soldier for the army of Italy in 1799. His father, president of the revolutionary tribunal of that town, had displayed so much energy in his office that the place had become too hot to hold the son when the parent, a pettifogging lawyer, perished on the scaffold after the ninth Thermidor. On the death of his mother, who died of the grief this catastrophe occasioned, Jean sold all that he possessed and rushed to Italy at the age of twenty-two, at the very moment when our armies were beginning... Long Stories - Post by : jptia - Date : May 2012 - Author : Honore De Balzac - Read : 3546

Modeste Mignon - Chapter 2. A Portrait From Life Modeste Mignon - Chapter 2. A Portrait From Life

Modeste Mignon - Chapter 2. A Portrait From Life
CHAPTER II. A PORTRAIT FROM LIFEFrom the manner with which the Latournelles entered the Chalet a stranger would readily have guessed that they came there every evening. "Ah, you are here already," said the notary, perceiving the young banker Gobenheim, a connection of Gobenheim-Keller, the head of the great banking house in Paris. This young man with a livid face--a blonde of the type with black eyes, whose immovable glance has an indescribable fascination, sober in speech as in conduct, dressed in black, lean as a consumptive, but nevertheless vigorously framed--visited the family of his former master and the house of... Long Stories - Post by : jptia - Date : May 2012 - Author : Honore De Balzac - Read : 1597

Modeste Mignon - Chapter 1. The Chalet Modeste Mignon - Chapter 1. The Chalet

Modeste Mignon - Chapter 1. The Chalet
CHAPTER I. THE CHALETAt the beginning of October, 1829, Monsieur Simon Babylas Latournelle, notary, was walking up from Havre to Ingouville, arm in arm with his son and accompanied by his wife, at whose side the head clerk of the lawyer's office, a little hunchback named Jean Butscha, trotted along like a page. When these four personages (two of whom came the same way every evening) reached the elbow of the road where it turns back upon itself like those called in Italy "cornice," the notary looked about to see if any one could overhear him either from the terrace above... Long Stories - Post by : jptia - Date : May 2012 - Author : Honore De Balzac - Read : 2511

Modeste Mignon - Preface Modeste Mignon - Preface

Modeste Mignon - Preface
Title: Modeste Mignon Author: Honore de Balzac Translated by: Katharine Prescott Wormeley  DEDICATION To a Polish Lady. Daughter of an enslaved land, angel through love, witch through fancy, child by faith, aged by experience, man in brain, woman in heart, giant by hope, mother through sorrows, poet in thy dreams, --to _thee belongs this book, in which thy love, thy fancy, thy experience, thy sorrow, thy hope, thy dreams, are the warp through which is shot a woof less brilliant than the poesy of thy soul, whose expression, when it shines upon thy countenance, is, to those who love thee, what... Long Stories - Post by : jptia - Date : May 2012 - Author : Honore De Balzac - Read : 1555

Mercadet: A Comedy In Three Acts - Act 3 Mercadet: A Comedy In Three Acts - Act 3

Mercadet: A Comedy In Three Acts - Act 3
ACT IIISCENE FIRST (Another apartment in Mercadet's house, well furnished. At the back and in the centre is a mantel-piece, having instead of a mirror a clear plate of glass; side doors; a large table, surrounded by chairs, in the middle of the stage; sofa and armchairs.) (Justin, Therese and Virginie, then Mercadet.) (Justin enters first and beckons to Therese. Virginie, carrying papers, sits insolently on the sofa. Justin looks through the keyhole of the door on the left side and listens.) THERESE. Is it possible that they could pretend to conceal from us the condition of their affairs? VIRGINIE. Old... Plays - Post by : fmode - Date : May 2012 - Author : Honore De Balzac - Read : 979

Mercadet: A Comedy In Three Acts - Act 2 Mercadet: A Comedy In Three Acts - Act 2

Mercadet: A Comedy In Three Acts - Act 2
ACT IISCENE FIRST (Mercadet's study, containing book-shelves, a safe, a desk, an armchair and a sofa.) (MINARD and JUSTIN, then JULIE.) MINARD. Did you say that M. Mercadet wished to speak with me? JUSTIN. Yes, sir. But mademoiselle has requested that you await her here. MINARD (aside) Her father asks to see me. She wishes to speak to me before the interview. Something extraordinary must have happened. JUSTIN. Mademoiselle is here. (Enter Julie.) MINARD (going towards her) Mlle. Julie! JULIE. JUSTIN, inform my father that the gentleman has arrived. (Exit JUSTIN.) If you wish, Adolphe, that our love should shine as... Plays - Post by : fmode - Date : May 2012 - Author : Honore De Balzac - Read : 2500

Mercadet: A Comedy In Three Acts - Act 1 Mercadet: A Comedy In Three Acts - Act 1

Mercadet: A Comedy In Three Acts - Act 1
ACT ISCENE FIRST (A drawing-room. A door in the centre. Side doors. At the front, to the left, a mantel-piece with a mirror. To the right, a window, and next it a writing-table. Armchairs.) (JUSTIN, VIRGINIE and THERESE.) JUSTIN (finishing dusting the room) Yes, my dears, he finds it very hard to swim; he is certain to drown, poor M. Mercadet. VIRGINIE (her basket on her arm) Honestly, do you think that? JUSTIN. He is ruined! And although there is much fat to be stewed from a master while he is financially embarrassed, you must not forget that he owes us... Plays - Post by : fmode - Date : May 2012 - Author : Honore De Balzac - Read : 3111

Mercadet: A Comedy In Three Acts - Persons Of The Play Mercadet: A Comedy In Three Acts - Persons Of The Play

Mercadet: A Comedy In Three Acts - Persons Of The Play
Title: Mercadet: A Comedy In Three Acts Author: Honore De Balzac Presented for the First Time in ParisAt the Theatre du Gymnase-DramatiqueAugust 24, 1851 PERSONS OF THE PLAY Mercadet, a speculatorMadame Mercadet, his wifeJULIE, their daughterMINARD, clerk of MercadetVERDELIN, friend of MercadetGOULARD, creditor of MercadetPIERQUIN, creditor of MercadetVIOLETTE, creditor of MercadetMERICOURT, acquaintance of MercadetDE LA BRIVE, suitor to JulieJUSTIN, valetTHERESE, lady's maidVIRGINIE, cookVarious other creditors of Mercadet SCENE: Paris, in the house of MercadetTIME: About 1845... Plays - Post by : fmode - Date : May 2012 - Author : Honore De Balzac - Read : 2837

Massimilla Doni - Part 6 Massimilla Doni - Part 6

Massimilla Doni - Part 6
The Duchess feared that she was seeing her Emilio for the last time. As to the Prince: in the presence of the Duchess, the sovereign divinity who lifted him to the skies, he had forgotten where he was, he no longer heard the voice of the woman who had initiated him into the mysteries of earthly pleasure, for deep dejection made his ears tingle with a chorus of plaintive voices, half-drowned in a rushing noise as of pouring rain. Vendramin saw himself in an ancient Venetian costume, looking on at the ceremony of the _Bucentaur_. The Frenchman, who plainly discerned that... Long Stories - Post by : fmode - Date : May 2012 - Author : Honore De Balzac - Read : 2189

Massimilla Doni - Part 5 Massimilla Doni - Part 5

Massimilla Doni - Part 5
The Duchess had spoken while the curtain was being raised. And now the physician heard the sublime symphony with which the composer introduces the great Biblical drama. It is to express the sufferings of a whole nation. Suffering is uniform in its expression, especially physical suffering. Thus, having instinctively felt, like all men of genius, that here there must be no variety of idea, the musician, having hit on his leading phrase, has worked it out in various keys, grouping the masses and the dramatis personae to take up the theme through modulations and cadences of admirable structure. In such simplicity... Long Stories - Post by : fmode - Date : May 2012 - Author : Honore De Balzac - Read : 911

Massimilla Doni - Part 4 Massimilla Doni - Part 4

Massimilla Doni - Part 4
After sitting a few minutes listening to the eager war of words between the physician and the Duchess, who showed much ingenious eloquence, the Italians, one by one, took leave, and went off to tell the news in every box, that la Cataneo, who was regarded as a woman of great wit and spirit, had, on the question of Italy, defeated a famous French doctor. This was the talk of the evening. As soon as the Frenchman found himself alone with the Duchess and the Prince, he understood that they were to be left together, and took leave. Massimilla bowed with... Long Stories - Post by : fmode - Date : May 2012 - Author : Honore De Balzac - Read : 1160

Massimilla Doni - Preface Massimilla Doni - Preface

Massimilla Doni - Preface
Title: Massimilla Doni Author: Honore de Balzac Translated by: Clara Bell and James Waring DEDICATION To Jacques Strunz. MY DEAR STRUNZ:--I should be ungrateful if I did not set your name at the head of one of the two tales I could never have written but for your patient kindness and care. Accept this as my grateful acknowledgment of the readiness with which you tried--perhaps not very successfully--to initiate me into the mysteries of musical knowledge. You have at least taught me what difficulties and what labor genius must bury in those poems which procure us transcendental pleasures. You have also... Long Stories - Post by : fmode - Date : May 2012 - Author : Honore De Balzac - Read : 2599