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The Odyssey - Book XXIV The Odyssey - Book XXIV

The Odyssey - Book XXIV
Book XXIV. The Ithacans bury the wooers, and sitting in council resolve on revenge. And coming near the house of Laertes, are met by Odysseus, and Laertes with Telemachus and servants, the whole number twelve, and are overcome, and submit.Now Cyllenian Hermes called forth from the halls the souls of the wooers, and he held in his hand his wand that is fair and golden with he lulls the eyes of men, of whomso he will, while others again he even wakens out of sleep. Herewith he roused and led the souls who followed gibbering. And even as bats flit gibbering... Nonfictions - Post by : juanita - Date : January 2011 - Author : Homer - Read : 2888

The Odyssey - Book XIV The Odyssey - Book XIV

The Odyssey - Book XIV
Book XIV. Odysseus, in the form of a beggar, goes to Eumaeus, the master of his swine he is well used and tells a feigned story, and informs himself of the behaviour of the wooers.But Odysseus fared forth from the haven by the rough track, up the wooded country and through the heights Athene had showed him that he should find the goodly swineherd, who cared most for his substance of all the thralls that goodly Odysseus had gotten.Now he found him sitting at the vestibule of the house his courtyard was builded high, in a place with... Nonfictions - Post by : R_Hagel - Date : January 2011 - Author : Homer - Read : 1547

The Odyssey - Book XXIII The Odyssey - Book XXIII

The Odyssey - Book XXIII
Book XXIII. Odysseus maketh himself known to Penelope, tells his adventures briefly, and in the morning goes to Laertes and makes himself known to himThen the ancient woman went up into the upper chamber laughing aloud, to tell her mistress how her dear lord was within, and her knees moved fast for joy, and her feet stumbled one over the other; and she stood above the lady's head and spake to her, saying:'Awake, Penelope, dear child, that thou mayest see with thine own eyes that which thou desirest day by day. Odysseus hath come, and hath got him to his own... Nonfictions - Post by : Zaahn - Date : January 2011 - Author : Homer - Read : 3119

The Odyssey - Book XXII The Odyssey - Book XXII

The Odyssey - Book XXII
Book XXII. The killing of the wooersThen Odysseus of many counsels stripped him of his rags and leaped on to the great threshold with his bow and quiver full of arrows, and poured forth all the swift shafts there before his feet, and spake among the wooers:'Lo, now is this terrible trial ended at last; and now will I know of another mark, which never yet man has smitten, if perchance I may hit it and Apollo grant me renown.'With that he pointed the bitter arrow at Antinous. Now he was about raising to his lips a fair twy-eared chalice of... Nonfictions - Post by : ID3000 - Date : January 2011 - Author : Homer - Read : 1277

The Odyssey - Book XXI The Odyssey - Book XXI

The Odyssey - Book XXI
Book XXI. Penelope bringeth forth her husband's bow, which the suitors could not bend, but was bent by OdysseusNow the goddess, grey-eyed Athene, put it into the heart of the daughter of Icarius, wise Penelope, to set the bow and the axes of grey iron, for the wooers in the halls of Odysseus, to be the weapons of the contest, and the beginning of death. So she descended the tall staircase of her chamber, and took the well-bent key in her strong hand, a goodly key of bronze on was a handle of ivory. And she betook her, with her handmaidens,... Nonfictions - Post by : andyfrain - Date : January 2011 - Author : Homer - Read : 2464

The Odyssey - Book XX The Odyssey - Book XX

The Odyssey - Book XX
Book XX. Pallas and Odysseus consult of the killing of the wooersBut the goodly Odysseus laid him down to sleep in the vestibule of the house. He spread an undressed bull's hide on the ground and above it many fleeces of sheep, that the Achaeans were wont to slay in sacrifice, and Eurynome threw a mantle over him where he lay. There Odysseus lay wakeful, with evil thoughts against the wooers in his heart. And the women came forth from their chamber, that aforetime were wont to lie with the wooers, making laughter and mirth among themselves. Then the heart of... Nonfictions - Post by : john_kennedy - Date : January 2011 - Author : Homer - Read : 1071

The Odyssey - Book XVIII The Odyssey - Book XVIII

The Odyssey - Book XVIII
Book XVIII. The fighting at fists of Odysseus with Irus. His admonitions to Amphinomus. Penelope appears before the wooers, and draws presents from them.Then up came a common beggar, who was wont to beg through the town of Ithaca, one that was known among all men for ravening greed, for his endless eating and drinking, yet he had no force or might, though he was bulky enough to look on. Arnaeus was his name, for so had his good mother given it him at his birth, but all the young men called him Irus, because he ran on errands, whensoever any... Nonfictions - Post by : Tortuga505 - Date : January 2011 - Author : Homer - Read : 2037

The Odyssey - Book XVII The Odyssey - Book XVII

The Odyssey - Book XVII
Book XVII. Telemachus relates to his mother what he had heard at Pylos and SpartaSo soon as early Dawn shone forth, the rosy-fingered, then Telemachus, the dear son of divine Odysseus, bound beneath his feet his goodly sandals, and took up his mighty spear that fitted his grasp, to make for the city; and he spake to his swineherd, saying:'Verily, father, I am bound for the city, that my mother may see me, for methinks that she will not cease from grievous wailing and tearful lament, until she beholds my very face. But this command I give thee: Lead this stranger,... Nonfictions - Post by : Savvymarketer - Date : January 2011 - Author : Homer - Read : 3110

The Odyssey - Book XVI The Odyssey - Book XVI

The Odyssey - Book XVI
Book XVI. Telemachus sends Eumaeus to the city to tell his mother of his return. And how, in the meantime, Odysseus discovers himself to his son.Now these twain, Odysseus and the goodly swineherd, within the hut had kindled a fire, and were making ready breakfast at the dawn, and had sent forth the herdsmen with the droves of swine. And round Telemachus the hounds, that love to bark, fawned and barked not, as he drew nigh. And goodly Odysseus took note of the fawning of the dogs, and the noise of footsteps fell upon his ears. Then straight he spake to... Nonfictions - Post by : apoliving - Date : January 2011 - Author : Homer - Read : 3307

The Odyssey - Book XV The Odyssey - Book XV

The Odyssey - Book XV
Book XV. Pallas sends home Telemachus from Lacedaemon with the presents given him by Menelaus. Telemachus landed, goes first to Eumaeus.Now Pallas Athene went to the wide land of Lacedaemon, to put the noble son of the great-hearted Odysseus in mind of his return, and to make him hasten his coming. And she found Telemachus, and the glorious son of Nestor, couched at the vestibule of the house of famous Menelaus. The son of Nestor truly was overcome with soft sleep, but sweet sleep gat not hold of Telemachus, but, through the night divine, careful thoughts for his father kept him... Nonfictions - Post by : mlmnotes - Date : January 2011 - Author : Homer - Read : 2121

The Odyssey - Book XIX The Odyssey - Book XIX

The Odyssey - Book XIX
Book XIX. Telemachus removes the arms out of the hall. Odysseus disburseth with Penelope. And is known by his nurse, but concealed. And the hunting of the boar upon that occasion relatedNow the goodly Odysseus was left behind in the hall, devising with Athene's aid the slaying of the wooers, and straightway he spake winged words to Telemachus:'Telemachus, we must needs lay by the weapons of war within, every one; and when the wooers miss them and ask thee concerning them, thou shalt beguile them with soft words, saying:'Out of the smoke I laid them by, since they were no longer... Nonfictions - Post by : AesopHD - Date : January 2011 - Author : Homer - Read : 1793

The Odyssey - Book XIII The Odyssey - Book XIII

The Odyssey - Book XIII
Book XIII. Odysseus, sleeping, is set ashore at Ithaca by the Phaeacians, and waking knows it not. Pallas, in the form of a shepherd, helps to hide his treasure. The ship that conveyed him is turned into a rock, and Odysseus by Pallas is instructed what to do, and transformed into an old beggarman.So spake he, and dead silence fell on all, and they were spell-bound throughout the shadowy halls. Thereupon Alcinous answered him, and spake, saying:'Odysseus, now that thou hast come to my high house with floor of bronze, never, methinks, shalt thou be driven from thy way ere thou... Nonfictions - Post by : sansoftyme - Date : January 2011 - Author : Homer - Read : 901

The Odyssey - Book XII The Odyssey - Book XII

The Odyssey - Book XII
Book XII Odysseus, his passage by the Sirens, and by Scylla and Charybdis. The sacrilege committed by his men in the isle Thrinacia. The destruction of his ships and men. How he swam on a plank nine days together, and came to Ogygia he stayed seven years with Calypso.'Now after the ship had left the stream of the river Oceanus, and was come to the wave of the wide sea, and the isle Aeaean is the dwelling place of early Dawn and her dancing grounds, and the land of sunrising, upon our coming thither we beached the ship in... Nonfictions - Post by : Grant - Date : January 2011 - Author : Homer - Read : 2579

The Odyssey - Book XI The Odyssey - Book XI

The Odyssey - Book XI
Book XI. Odysseus, his descent into hell, and discourses with the ghosts of the deceased heroes.'Now when we had gone down to the ship and to the sea, first of all we drew the ship unto the fair salt water and placed the mast and sails in the black ship, and took those sheep and put them therein, and ourselves too climbed on board, sorrowing, and shedding big tears. And in the wake of our dark-prowed ship she sent a favouring wind that filled the sails, a kindly escort,--even Circe of the braided tresses, a dread goddess of human speech. And... Nonfictions - Post by : rbussey - Date : January 2011 - Author : Homer - Read : 1554

The Odyssey - Book X The Odyssey - Book X

The Odyssey - Book X
Book X. Odysseus, his entertainment by Aeolus, of whom he received a fair wind for the present, and all the rest of the winds tied up in a bag; which his men untying, flew out, and carried him back to Aeolus, who refused to receive him. His adventure at Laestrygonia with Antiphates of twelve ships he lost eleven, men and all. How he went thence to the Isle of Aea half of his men were turned by Circe into swine, and how he went himself, and by the help of Hermes recovered them and stayed with Circe a year.'Then... Nonfictions - Post by : cr1275 - Date : January 2011 - Author : Homer - Read : 3385

The Odyssey - Book IX The Odyssey - Book IX

The Odyssey - Book IX
Book IX. Odysseus relates, first, what befell him amongst the Cicones at Ismarus; secondly, amongst the Lotophagi; thirdly, how he was used by the Cyclops Polyphemus.And Odysseus of many counsels answered him saying: 'King Alcinous, most notable of all the people, verily it is a good thing to list to a minstrel such as this one, like to the gods in voice. Nay, as for me, I say that there is no more gracious or perfect delight than when a whole people makes merry, and the men sit orderly at feast in the halls and listen to the singer, and the... Nonfictions - Post by : jaepee - Date : January 2011 - Author : Homer - Read : 1264

The Odyssey - Book VIII The Odyssey - Book VIII

The Odyssey - Book VIII
Book VIII The next day's entertainment of Odysseus he sees them contend in wrestling and other exercises, and upon provocation took up a greater stone than that which they were throwing, and overthrew them all. Alcinous and the lords give him presents. And how the king asked his name, his country, and his adventures.Now when early Dawn shone forth, the rosy-fingered, then the mighty king Alcinous gat him up from his bed; and Odysseus, of the seed of Zeus, likewise uprose, the waster of cities. And the mighty king Alcinous led the way to the assembly place of the... Nonfictions - Post by : panitheo - Date : January 2011 - Author : Homer - Read : 1677

The Odyssey - Book VII The Odyssey - Book VII

The Odyssey - Book VII
Book VII. Odysseus being received at the house of the king Alcinous, the queen after supper, taking notice of his garments, gives him occasion to relate his passage thither on the raft. Alcinous promises him a convoy for the morrow.So he prayed there, the steadfast goodly Odysseus, while the two strong mules bare the princess to the town. And when she had now come to the famous palace of her father, she halted at the gateway, and round her gathered her brothers, men like to the immortals, and they loosed the mules from under the car, and carried the raiment within.... Nonfictions - Post by : chris1492 - Date : January 2011 - Author : Homer - Read : 2586

The Odyssey - Book VI The Odyssey - Book VI

The Odyssey - Book VI
Book VI. Nausicaa, going to a river near that place to wash the clothes of her father, mother, and brethren, while the clothes were drying played with her maids at ball; and Odysseus coming forth is fed and clothed, and led on his way to the house of her father, King Alcinous.So there he lay asleep, the steadfast goodly Odysseus, fordone with toil and drowsiness. Meanwhile Athene went to the land and the city of the Phaeacians, who of old, upon a time, dwelt in spacious Hypereia; near the Cyclopes they dwelt, men exceeding proud, who harried them continually, being mightier... Nonfictions - Post by : hirini-reedy - Date : January 2011 - Author : Homer - Read : 2932

The Odyssey - Book V The Odyssey - Book V

The Odyssey - Book V
Book V. The Gods in council command Calypso by Hermes to send away Odysseus on a raft of trees; and Poseidon, returning from Ethiopia and seeing him on the coast of Phaeacia, scattered his raft; and how by the help of Ino he was thrown ashore, and slept on a heap of dry leaves till the next day.Now the Dawn arose from her couch, from the side of the lordly Tithonus, to bear light to the immortals and to mortal men. And lo, the gods were gathering to session, and among them Zeus, that thunders on high, whose might is above... Nonfictions - Post by : jack05 - Date : January 2011 - Author : Homer - Read : 2126