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From Thomas Powell's 'humane Industry' From Thomas Powell's "humane Industry"

From Thomas Powell's 'humane Industry'
1661.1. (CAMPION. EPIGR. I. 151.) Time's-Teller wrought into a little round, Which count'st the days and nights with watchful sound; How--when once fix'd--with busy wheels dost thou The twice twelve useful hours drive on and show; And where I go, go'st with me without strife, The monitor and ease of fleeting life. 2. (GROTIUS. LIB. EPIGR. II.) The untired strength of never-ceasing motion, A restless rest, a toilless operation, Heaven then had given it, when... Poems - Post by : villarj - Date : October 2011 - Author : Henry Vaughan - Read : 3473

From 'hermetical Physic': Translated From Henry Nollius From "hermetical Physic": Translated From Henry Nollius

From 'hermetical Physic': Translated From Henry Nollius
(1655)1. (HORACE. EPIST. I. 1, 14-5.) Where'er my fancy calls, there I go still, Not sworn a slave to any master's will. 2. (INCERTI.) There's need, betwixt his clothes, his bed and board, Of all that Earth and Sea and Air afford. 3. (INCERTI.) With restless cares they waste the night and day, To compass great estates, and get the sway. 4. (JUVENAL. SATIRE XV. 160-164.) Whenever did, I pray,... Poems - Post by : newfound - Date : October 2011 - Author : Henry Vaughan - Read : 2528

From 'primitive Holiness, Set Forth In The Life Of Blessed Paulinus' From "primitive Holiness, Set Forth In The Life Of Blessed Paulinus"

From 'primitive Holiness, Set Forth In The Life Of Blessed Paulinus'
1654.1. (AUSONIUS. EPIST. XXIV. 115-16.) Let me not weep to see thy ravish'd house All sad and silent, without lord or spouse, And all those vast dominions once thine own Torn 'twixt a hundred slaves to me unknown. 2. (AUSONIUS. EPIST. XXIII. 30-1; XXV. 5-9, 14, 17.) How could that paper sent, That luckless paper, merit thy contempt? Ev'n foe to foe--though furiously--replies, And the defied his enemy defies. Amidst the swords and wounds, there's... Poems - Post by : lukilady - Date : October 2011 - Author : Henry Vaughan - Read : 2605

From A 'discourse Of Life And Death': Translated From Nierembergius From A "discourse Of Life And Death": Translated From Nierembergius

From A 'discourse Of Life And Death': Translated From Nierembergius
1654.1. (INCERTI.) Whose hissings fright all Nature's monstrous ills; His eye darts death, more swift than poison kills. All monsters by instinct to him give place, They fly for life, for death lives in his face; And he alone by Nature's hid commands Reigns paramount, and prince of all the sands. 2. (INCERTI.) The plenteous evils of frail life fill the old: Their wasted limbs the loose skin in dry folds Doth hang about: their... Poems - Post by : PlayersGolf - Date : October 2011 - Author : Henry Vaughan - Read : 727

From A Discourse 'of Temperance And Patience': Translated From Nierembergius From A Discourse "of Temperance And Patience": Translated From Nierembergius

From A Discourse 'of Temperance And Patience': Translated From Nierembergius
1654.1. (INCERTI.) The naked man too gets the field, And often makes the armed foe to yield. 2. (LUCRETIUS, IV. 1012-1020.) (Some) struggle and groan as if by panthers torn, Or lions' teeth, which makes them loudly mourn; Some others seem unto themselves to die; Some climb steep solitudes and mountains high, From whence they seem to fall inanely down, Panting with fear, till wak'd, and scarce their own They feel about them if in... Poems - Post by : Jeannine79 - Date : October 2011 - Author : Henry Vaughan - Read : 2463

From The Epistle-dedicatory To 'flores Solitudinis' From The Epistle-dedicatory To "flores Solitudinis"

From The Epistle-dedicatory To 'flores Solitudinis'
1654.1. (BISSELLIUS.) The whole wench--how complete soe'er--was but A specious bait; a soft, sly, tempting slut; A pleasing witch; a living death; a fair, Thriving disease; a fresh, infectious air; A precious plague; a fury sweetly drawn; Wild fire laid up and finely dress'd in lawn.2. (AUGURELLIUS.) Peter, when thou this pleasant world dost see, Believe, thou seest mere dreams and vanity, Not real things, but false, and through the air... Poems - Post by : stovis - Date : October 2011 - Author : Henry Vaughan - Read : 1389

From 'man In Glory': Translated From Anselm From "man In Glory": Translated From Anselm

From 'man In Glory': Translated From Anselm
1652.1. (ANSELM.) Here holy Anselm lives in ev'ry page, And sits archbishop still, to vex the age. Had he foreseen--and who knows but he did?-- This fatal wrack, which deep in time lay hid, 'Tis but just to believe, that little hand Which clouded him, but now benights our land, Had never--like Elias--driv'n him hence, A sad retirer for a slight offence. For were he now, like the returning year, Restor'd,... Poems - Post by : littleron - Date : October 2011 - Author : Henry Vaughan - Read : 2219

From 'the Mount Of Olives' From "the Mount Of Olives"

From 'the Mount Of Olives'
16521. (DEATH.) Draw near, fond man, and dress thee by this glass, Mark how thy bravery and big looks must pass Into corruption, rottenness and dust; The frail supporters which betray'd thy trust. O weigh in time thy last and loathsome state! To purchase heav'n for tears is no hard rate. Our glory, greatness, wisdom, all we have, If mis-employ'd, but add hell to the grave: Only a fair redemption of evil times... Poems - Post by : megaoptinlist - Date : October 2011 - Author : Henry Vaughan - Read : 1738

From 'of The Diseases Of The Mind And The Body': Translated From Plutarch From "of The Diseases Of The Mind And The Body": Translated From Plutarch

From 'of The Diseases Of The Mind And The Body': Translated From Plutarch
16511. (HOMER. ILIAD, XVII. 446-7.) That man for misery excell'd All creatures which the wide world held. 2. (EURIPIDES. BACCHAE, 1170-4.) A tender kid--see 'tis put-- I on the hills did slay, Now dress'd and into quarters cut, A pleasant, dainty prey.(The end)Henry Vaughan's poem: From "of The Diseases Of The Mind And The Body": Translated From Plutarch... Poems - Post by : Charles_H_Smith - Date : October 2011 - Author : Henry Vaughan - Read : 885

From 'of The Benefit We May Get By Our Enemies': Translated From Plutarch From "of The Benefit We May Get By Our Enemies": Translated From Plutarch

From 'of The Benefit We May Get By Our Enemies': Translated From Plutarch
16511. (HOMER. ILIAD, I. 255-6.) Sure Priam will to mirth incline, And all that are of Priam's line. 2. (AESCHYLUS. SEPTEM CONTRA THEBES, 600-1.) Feeding on fruits which in the heavens do grow, Whence all divine and holy counsels flow. 3. (EURIPIDES. ORESTES, 251-2.) Excel then if thou canst, be not withstood, But strive and overcome the evil with good. 4. (EURIPIDES. FRAGM. MLXXI.) You minister to others' wounds a cure, But leave your own all rotten and impure. 5. (EURIPIDES.... Poems - Post by : waazgmans - Date : October 2011 - Author : Henry Vaughan - Read : 3435

(to Charles The First) (to Charles The First)

(to Charles The First)
From Eucharistica Oxoniensia in Caroli Regis nostri e Scotia Reditum Gratulatoria (1641). As kings do rule like th' heavens, who dispense To parts remote and near their influence; So doth our Charles move also; while he posts From south to north, and back to southern coasts; Like to the starry orb, which in its round Moves to those very points; but while 'tis bound For north, there is--some guess--a trembling fit And shivering in the part that's... Poems - Post by : ubupats - Date : October 2011 - Author : Henry Vaughan - Read : 2057

Daphnis Daphnis

Daphnis
An Elegiac Eclogue. The Interlocutors, Damon, Menalcas.Damon. What clouds, Menalcas, do oppress thy brow, Flow'rs in a sunshine never look so low? Is Nisa still cold flint? or have thy lambs Met with the fox by straying from their dams?Menalcas. Ah, Damon, no! my lambs are safe; and she Is kind, and much more white than they can be. But what doth life when most serene afford Without a worm which gnaws her... Poems - Post by : wildwoods714 - Date : October 2011 - Author : Henry Vaughan - Read : 2077

To Christian Religion To Christian Religion

To Christian Religion
Farewell, thou true and tried reflection Of the still poor, and meek election: Farewell, soul's joy, the quick'ning health Of spirits, and their secret wealth! Farewell, my morning-star, the bright And dawning looks of the True Light! O blessed shiner, tell me whither Thou wilt be gone, when night comes hither! A seer that observ'd thee in Thy course, and watch'd the growth of sin, Hath giv'n his judgment, and foretold,... Poems - Post by : rogerjones - Date : October 2011 - Author : Henry Vaughan - Read : 690

The Bee The Bee

The Bee
From fruitful beds and flow'ry borders, Parcell'd to wasteful ranks and orders, Where State grasps more than plain Truth needs, And wholesome herbs are starv'd by weeds, To the wild woods I will be gone, And the coarse meals of great Saint John. When truth and piety are miss'd Both in the rulers and the priest; When pity is not cold, but dead, And the rich eat the poor like bread;... Poems - Post by : sirius - Date : October 2011 - Author : Henry Vaughan - Read : 1462

The World The World

The World
Can any tell me what it is? Can you That wind your thoughts into a clue To guide out others, while yourselves stay in, And hug the sin? I, who so long have in it liv'd, That, if I might, In truth I would not be repriev'd,... Poems - Post by : jamesmicucci - Date : October 2011 - Author : Henry Vaughan - Read : 2434

De Salmone De Salmone

De Salmone
Ad virum optimum, et sibi familiarius notum: D. Thomam Poellum Cantrevensem: S. S. Theologiae Doctorem. Accipe praerapido salmonem in gurgite captum, Ex imo in summas cum penetrasset aquas, Mentitae culicis quem forma elusit inanis: Picta coloratis plumea musca notis. Dum captat, capitur; vorat inscius, ipse vorandus; Fitque cibi raptor grata rapina mali. Alma quies! miserae merces ditissima vitae, Quam tuto in tacitis hic latuisset aquis! Qui... Poems - Post by : michned - Date : October 2011 - Author : Henry Vaughan - Read : 1193

Servilii Fatum, Sive Vindicta Divina Servilii Fatum, Sive Vindicta Divina

Servilii Fatum, Sive Vindicta Divina
Et sic in cithara, sic in dulcedine vitae Et facti et luctus regnat amarities. Quam subito in fastum extensos atque esseda(1) vultus Ultrici oppressit vilis arena sinu! Si violae, spiransque crocus: si lilium (Greek: aeinon) Non nisi justorum nascitur e cinere: Spinarum, tribulique atque infelicis avenae Quantus in hoc tumulo et qualis acervus erit? Dii superi! damnosa piis sub sidera longum Mansuris stabilem conciliate... Poems - Post by : ahdonline - Date : October 2011 - Author : Henry Vaughan - Read : 2486

Jordanis Jordanis

Jordanis
Quid celebras auratam undam, et combusta pyropis Flumina, vel medio quae serit aethra salo? Aeternum refluis si pernoctaret in undis Ph(oe)bus, et incertam sidera suda Tethyn Si colerent, tantae gemmae! nil caerula librem: Sorderet rubro in littore dives Eos. Pactoli mea lympha macras ditabit arenas, Atque universum gutta minuta Tagum. O caram caput! O cincinnos unda beatos Libata! O Domini balnea sancta mei!... Poems - Post by : jmoore1955 - Date : October 2011 - Author : Henry Vaughan - Read : 973

The Request The Request

The Request
O thou who didst deny to me This world's ador'd felicity, And ev'ry big imperious lust, Which fools admire in sinful dust, With those fine subtle twists, that tie Their bundles of foul gallantry-- Keep still my weak eyes from the shine Of those gay things which are not Thine! And shut my ears against the noise Of wicked, though applauded, joys! For Thou in any land hast store... Poems - Post by : jlook39 - Date : October 2011 - Author : Henry Vaughan - Read : 1739

The True Christmas The True Christmas

The True Christmas
So, stick up ivy and the bays, And then restore the heathen ways. Green will remind you of the spring, Though this great day denies the thing; And mortifies the earth, and all But your wild revels, and loose hall. Could you wear flow'rs, and roses strow Blushing upon your breasts' warm snow, That very dress your lightness will Rebuke, and wither at the ill. The brightness of this day we... Poems - Post by : 66319 - Date : October 2011 - Author : Henry Vaughan - Read : 1054