Author Henry James - Full Online Book

Full Online Books
BOOK CATEGORIES
Authors Authors Short Stories Short Stories Long Stories Long Stories Funny Stories Funny Stories Love Stories Love Stories Stories For Kids Stories For Kids Poems Poems Essays Essays Nonfictions Nonfictions Plays Plays Folktales Folktales Fairy Tales Fairy Tales Fables Fables Learning Kitchen Learning Kitchen
LINKS
Valid XHTML 1.0 Transitional Free Classified Website Without Registration Free Classified Website Daniel Company
Twitter Twitter Add book
donate

Full Online Book HomeAuthor Henry JamesPage 6

Famous Authors (View All Authors)

The Bostonians - Chapter 33 The Bostonians - Chapter 33

The Bostonians - Chapter 33
VOLUME II. BOOK SECOND. CHAPTER XXXIII."Come out with me, Miss Tarrant; come out with me. _Do come out with me." That was what Basil Ransom had been saying to Verena when they stood where Olive perceived them, in the embrasure of the window. It had of course taken considerable talk to lead up to this; for the tone, even more than the words, indicated a large increase of intimacy. Verena was mindful of this when he spoke; and it frightened her a little, made her uneasy, which was one of the reasons why she got up from her chair and went... Long Stories - Post by : goalguy12 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 1907

The Bostonians - Chapter 32 The Bostonians - Chapter 32

The Bostonians - Chapter 32
VOLUME II. BOOK SECOND. CHAPTER XXXII.The hour that Olive proposed to Mrs. Burrage, in a note sent early the next morning, for the interview to which she consented to lend herself, was the stroke of noon; this period of the day being chosen in consequence of a prevision of many subsequent calls upon her time. She remarked in her note that she did not wish any carriage to be sent for her, and she surged and swayed up the Fifth Avenue on one of the convulsive, clattering omnibuses which circulate in that thoroughfare. One of her reasons for mentioning twelve o'clock... Long Stories - Post by : calvin69 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 1013

The Bostonians - Chapter 31 The Bostonians - Chapter 31

The Bostonians - Chapter 31
VOLUME II. BOOK SECOND. CHAPTER XXXI.When she returned with her companion to the establishment in Tenth Street she saw two notes lying on the table in the hall; one of which she perceived to be addressed to Miss Chancellor, the other to herself. The hand was different, but she recognised both. Olive was behind her on the steps, talking to the coachman about sending another carriage for them in half an hour (they had left themselves but just time to dress); so that she simply possessed herself of her own note and ascended to her room. As she did so she... Long Stories - Post by : jaideep26 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 2640

The Bostonians - Chapter 30 The Bostonians - Chapter 30

The Bostonians - Chapter 30
VOLUME II. BOOK SECOND. CHAPTER XXX.Mrs. Luna would have been still less satisfied with the manner in which Olive received her proffered assistance had she known how many confidences that reticent young woman might have made her in return. Olive's whole life now was a matter for whispered communications; she felt this herself, as she sought the privacy of her own apartment after her interview with her sister. She had for the moment time to think; Verena having gone out with Mr. Burrage, who had made an appointment the night before to call for her to drive at that early hour.... Long Stories - Post by : herbdalyjr - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 3612

The Bostonians - Chapter 29 The Bostonians - Chapter 29

The Bostonians - Chapter 29
VOLUME II. BOOK SECOND. CHAPTER XXIX.Mrs. Luna was early in the field the next day, and her sister wondered to what she owed the honour of a visit from her at eleven o'clock in the morning. She very soon saw, when Adeline asked her whether it had been she who procured for Basil Ransom an invitation to Mrs. Burrage's."Me--why in the world should it have been me?" Olive asked, feeling something of a pang at the implication that it had not been Adeline, as she supposed."I didn't know--but you took him up so.""Why, Adeline Luna, when did I ever----?" Miss Chancellor... Long Stories - Post by : sanjen - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 1880

The Bostonians - Chapter 28 The Bostonians - Chapter 28

The Bostonians - Chapter 28
VOLUME II. BOOK SECOND. CHAPTER XXVIII.He could command the music-room very well from where he stood, behind a thick outer fringe of intently listening men. Verena Tarrant was erect on her little platform, dressed in white, with flowers in her bosom. The red cloth beneath her feet looked rich in the light of lamps placed on high pedestals on either side of the stage; it gave her figure a setting of colour which made it more pure and salient. She moved freely in her exposed isolation, yet with great sobriety of gesture; there was no table in front of her, and... Long Stories - Post by : sunroomguy - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 1771

The Bostonians - Chapter 27 The Bostonians - Chapter 27

The Bostonians - Chapter 27
VOLUME II. BOOK SECOND. CHAPTER XXVII."You won't speak to me in my own house--that I have almost grown used to; but if you are going to pass me over in public I think you might give me warning first." This was only her archness, and he knew what to make of that now; she was dressed in yellow and looked very plump and gay. He wondered at the unerring instinct by which she had discovered his exposed quarter. The outer room was completely empty; she had come in at the further door and found the field free for her operations. He... Long Stories - Post by : lordandg - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 1847

The Bostonians - Chapter 26 The Bostonians - Chapter 26

The Bostonians - Chapter 26
VOLUME II. BOOK SECOND. CHAPTER XXVI."Mrs. Henry Burrage, at home Wednesday evening, March 26th, at half-past nine o'clock." It was in consequence of having received a card with these words inscribed upon it that Basil Ransom presented himself, on the evening she had designated, at the house of a lady he had never heard of before. The account of the relation of effect to cause is not complete, however, unless I mention that the card bore, furthermore, in the left-hand lower corner, the words: "An Address from Miss Verena Tarrant." He had an idea (it came mainly from the look and... Long Stories - Post by : keymaster - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 1290

The Bostonians - Chapter 25 The Bostonians - Chapter 25

The Bostonians - Chapter 25
VOLUME II. BOOK SECOND. CHAPTER XXV.They passed through two or three small, short streets, which, with their little wooden houses, with still more wooden door-yards, looked as if they had been constructed by the nearest carpenter and his boy--a sightless, soundless, interspaced, embryonic region--and entered a long avenue which, fringed on either side with fresh villas, offering themselves trustfully to the public, had the distinction of a wide pavement of neat red brick. The new paint on the square detached houses shone afar off in the transparent air: they had, on top, little cupolas and belvederes, in front a pillared piazza,... Long Stories - Post by : Peter_Yexley - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 817

The Bostonians - Chapter 24 (Volume 2 Book 2) The Bostonians - Chapter 24 (Volume 2 Book 2)

The Bostonians - Chapter 24 (Volume 2 Book 2)
VOLUME II. BOOK SECOND. CHAPTER XXIV.A little more than an hour after this he stood in the parlour of Doctor Tarrant's suburban residence, in Monadnoc Place. He had induced a juvenile maid-servant, by an appeal somewhat impassioned, to let the ladies know that he was there; and she had returned, after a long absence, to say that Miss Tarrant would come down to him in a little while. He possessed himself, according to his wont, of the nearest book (it lay on the table, with an old magazine and a little japanned tray containing Tarrant's professional cards--his denomination as a mesmeric... Long Stories - Post by : mtaylor - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 982

The Bostonians - Chapter 23 The Bostonians - Chapter 23

The Bostonians - Chapter 23
VOLUME I. BOOK SECOND. CHAPTER XXIII.Three weeks afterward he stood in front of Olive Chancellor's house,looking up and down the street and hesitating. He had told Mrs. Lunathat he should like nothing better than to make another journey toBoston; and it was not simply because he liked it that he had come. Iwas on the point of saying that a happy chance had favoured him, but itoccurs to me that one is under no obligation to call chances bynattering epithets when they have been waited for so long. At any rate,the darkest hour is before the dawn; and a few days... Long Stories - Post by : rrakausk - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 2510

The Bostonians - Chapter 22 The Bostonians - Chapter 22

The Bostonians - Chapter 22
VOLUME I. BOOK SECOND. CHAPTER XXII.As he sat with Mrs. Luna, in her little back drawing-room, under thelamp, he felt rather more tolerant than before of the pressure she couldnot help putting upon him. Several months had elapsed, and he was nonearer to the sort of success he had hoped for. It stole over him gentlythat there was another sort, pretty visibly open to him, not so elevatednor so manly, it is true, but on which he should after all, perhaps, beable to reconcile it with his honour to fall back. Mrs. Luna had had aninspiration; for once in her life... Long Stories - Post by : Allnewe - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 902

The Bostonians - Chapter 21 (Volume 1 Book 2) The Bostonians - Chapter 21 (Volume 1 Book 2)

The Bostonians - Chapter 21 (Volume 1 Book 2)
VOLUME I. BOOK SECOND. CHAPTER XXI.Basil Ransom lived in New York, rather far to the eastward, and in theupper reaches of the town; he occupied two small shabby rooms in asomewhat decayed mansion which stood next to the corner of the SecondAvenue. The corner itself was formed by a considerable grocer's shop,the near neighbourhood of which was fatal to any pretensions Ransom andhis fellow-lodgers might have had in regard to gentility of situation.The house had a red, rusty face, and faded green shutters, of which theslats were limp and at variance with each other. In one of the lowerwindows was suspended... Long Stories - Post by : jahover - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 2372

The Bostonians - Chapter 20 The Bostonians - Chapter 20

The Bostonians - Chapter 20
VOLUME I. BOOK FIRST. CHAPTER XX.She hoped she should not soon see him again, and there appeared to be noreason she should, if their intercourse was to be conducted by means ofcheques. The understanding with Verena was, of course, complete; she hadpromised to stay with her friend as long as her friend should requireit. She had said at first that she couldn't give up her mother, but shehad been made to feel that there was no question of giving up. Sheshould be as free as air, to go and come; she could spend hours and dayswith her mother, whenever Mrs. Tarrant... Long Stories - Post by : corbymorris - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 2277

The Bostonians - Chapter 19 The Bostonians - Chapter 19

The Bostonians - Chapter 19
VOLUME I. BOOK FIRST. CHAPTER XIX.This idea of their triumph, a triumph as yet ultimate and remote, butpreceded by the solemn vista of an effort so religious as never to bewanting in ecstasy, became tremendously familiar to the two friends, butespecially to Olive, during the winter of 187-, a season which usheredin the most momentous period of Miss Chancellor's life. About Christmasa step was taken which advanced her affairs immensely, and put them, toher apprehension, on a regular footing. This consisted in Verena'scoming in to Charles Street to stay with her, in pursuance of anarrangement on Olive's part with Selah Tarrant... Long Stories - Post by : chrischoi - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 732

The Bostonians - Chapter 18 The Bostonians - Chapter 18

The Bostonians - Chapter 18
VOLUME I. BOOK FIRST. CHAPTER XVIII.Verena told her, a week after this, that Mr. Pardon wanted so much sheshould say she would marry him; and she added, with evident pleasure atbeing able to give her so agreeable a piece of news, that she haddeclined to say anything of the sort. She thought that now, at least,Olive must believe in her; for the proposal was more attractive thanMiss Chancellor seemed able to understand. "He does place things in avery seductive light," Verena said; "he says that if I become his wife Ishall be carried straight along by a force of excitement of... Long Stories - Post by : emaccenti - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 1556

The Bostonians - Chapter 17 The Bostonians - Chapter 17

The Bostonians - Chapter 17
VOLUME I. BOOK FIRST. CHAPTER XVII.The next time Verena saw Olive she said to her that she was ready tomake the promise she had asked the other night; but, to her greatsurprise, this young woman answered her by a question intended to checksuch rashness. Miss Chancellor raised a warning finger; she had an airof dissuasion almost as solemn as her former pressure; her passionateimpatience appeared to have given way to other considerations, to bereplaced by the resignation that comes with deeper reflexion. It wastinged in this case, indeed, by such bitterness as might be permitted toa young lady who cultivated the... Long Stories - Post by : Chillin - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 3344

The Bostonians - Chapter 16 The Bostonians - Chapter 16

The Bostonians - Chapter 16
VOLUME I. BOOK FIRST. CHAPTER XVI.Mr. Pardon, as Olive observed, was a little out of this combination; buthe was not a person to allow himself to droop. He came and seatedhimself by Miss Chancellor and broached a literary subject; he asked herif she were following any of the current "serials" in the magazines. Onher telling him that she never followed anything of that sort, heundertook a defence of the serial system, which she presently remindedhim that she had not attacked. He was not discouraged by this retort,but glided gracefully off to the question of Mount Desert; conversationon some subject or other... Long Stories - Post by : StaceyW - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 3452

The Bostonians - Chapter 15 The Bostonians - Chapter 15

The Bostonians - Chapter 15
VOLUME I. BOOK FIRST. CHAPTER XV.Tarrant, however, kept an eye in that direction; he was solemnly civilto Miss Chancellor, handed her the dishes at table over and over again,and ventured to intimate that the apple-fritters were very fine; but,save for this, alluded to nothing more trivial than the regeneration ofhumanity and the strong hope he felt that Miss Birdseye would again haveone of her delightful gatherings. With regard to this latter point heexplained that it was not in order that he might again present hisdaughter to the company, but simply because on such occasions there wasa valuable interchange of hopeful thought,... Long Stories - Post by : tcmdo - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 1098

The Bostonians - Chapter 14 The Bostonians - Chapter 14

The Bostonians - Chapter 14
VOLUME I. BOOK FIRST. CHAPTER XIV."We ought to have some one to meet her," Mrs. Tarrant said; "I presumeshe wouldn't care to come out just to see us." "She," between the motherand the daughter, at this period, could refer only to Olive Chancellor,who was discussed in the little house at Cambridge at all hours and fromevery possible point of view. It was never Verena now who began, for shehad grown rather weary of the topic; she had her own ways of thinking ofit, which were not her mother's, and if she lent herself to this lady'sextensive considerations it was because that... Long Stories - Post by : imported_n/a - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 619