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The Tragic Muse - Book 5 - Chapter 31 The Tragic Muse - Book 5 - Chapter 31

The Tragic Muse - Book 5 - Chapter 31
BOOK FIVE. CHAPTER XXXI.If he was ruffled by some of her conditions there was thus comfort and consolation to be drawn from others, beside the essential fascination--so small the doubt of that now--of the young lady's own society. He spent the afternoon, they all spent the afternoon, and the occasion reminded him of pages in _Wilhelm Meister_. He himself could pass for Wilhelm, and if Mrs. Rooth had little resemblance to Mignon, Miriam was remarkably like Philina. The movable feast awaiting them--luncheon, tea, dinner?--was delayed two or three hours; but the interval was a source of gaiety, for they all smoked... Long Stories - Post by : franknow2002 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 3132

The Tragic Muse - Book 5 - Chapter 30 The Tragic Muse - Book 5 - Chapter 30

The Tragic Muse - Book 5 - Chapter 30
BOOK FIVE. CHAPTER XXX.It was not till after the noon of the next day that he was to see Miriam Rooth. He wrote her a note that evening, to be delivered to her at the theatre, and during the performance she sent round to him a card with "All right, come to luncheon to-morrow" scrawled on it in pencil.When he presented himself at Balaklava Place he learned that the two ladies had not come in--they had gone again early to rehearsal; but they had left word that he was to be pleased to wait, they would appear from one moment to... Long Stories - Post by : 1edward - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 2311

The Tragic Muse - Book 5 - Chapter 29 The Tragic Muse - Book 5 - Chapter 29

The Tragic Muse - Book 5 - Chapter 29
BOOK FIFTH. CHAPTER XXIX.When that young woman saw him her cheek exhibited the prettiest, pleased, surprised red he had ever observed there, though far from unacquainted with its living tides, and she stood smiling at him with the outer dazzle in her eyes, still making him no motion to enter. She only said, "Oh Peter!" and then, "I'm all alone.""So much the better, dear Biddy. Is that any reason I shouldn't come in?""Dear no--do come in. You've just missed Nick; he has gone to the country--half an hour ago." She had on a large apron and in her hand carried a... Long Stories - Post by : ramalia7 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 1106

The Tragic Muse - Book 5 - Chapter 28 The Tragic Muse - Book 5 - Chapter 28

The Tragic Muse - Book 5 - Chapter 28
BOOK FIFTH. CHAPTER XXVIII.They spent on their way to Florence several days in Paris Peter Sherringham had as much free talk with his sister as it often befell one member of their family to have with another. He enjoyed, that is, on two different occasions, half an hour's gossip with her in her sitting-room at the hotel. On one of these he took the liberty of asking her whether or no, decidedly, she meant to marry Nick Dormer. Julia expressed to him that she appreciated his curiosity, but that Nick and she were nothing more than relations and good friends.... Long Stories - Post by : healthwizard - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 1797

The Tragic Muse - Book 5 - Chapter 27 The Tragic Muse - Book 5 - Chapter 27

The Tragic Muse - Book 5 - Chapter 27
BOOK FIFTH. CHAPTER XXVII.Nick went to Great Stanhope Street at five o'clock and learned, rather to his surprise, that Julia was not at home--to his surprise because he had told her he would come at that hour, and he attributed to her, with a certain simplicity, an eager state of mind in regard to his explanation. Apparently she was not eager; the eagerness was his own--he was eager to explain. He recognised, not without a certain consciousness of magnanimity in doing so, that there had been some reason for her quick withdrawal from his studio or at any rate for her... Long Stories - Post by : newfound - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 3235

The Tragic Muse - Book 5 - Chapter 26 The Tragic Muse - Book 5 - Chapter 26

The Tragic Muse - Book 5 - Chapter 26
BOOK FIFTH. CHAPTER XXVI.It was success, the member for Harsh felt, that had made her finer--the full possession of her talent and the sense of the recognition of it. There was an intimation in her presence (if he had given his mind to it) that for him too the same cause would produce the same effect--that is would show him how being launched in the practice of an art makes strange and prompt revelations. Nick felt clumsy beside a person who manifestly, now, had such an extraordinary familiarity with the esthetic point of view. He remembered too the clumsiness that had... Long Stories - Post by : mlmnotes - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 1602

The Tragic Muse - Book 5 - Chapter 25 The Tragic Muse - Book 5 - Chapter 25

The Tragic Muse - Book 5 - Chapter 25
BOOK FIFTH. CHAPTER XXV.Nash brought her, the great modern personage, as he had described her, the very next day, and it took his friend no long time to test his assurance that Miriam Rooth was now splendid. She had made an impression on him ten months before, but it had haunted him only a day, soon overlaid as it had been with other images. Yet after Nash had talked of her a while he recalled her better; some of her attitudes, some of her looks and tones began to hover before him. He was charmed in advance with the notion of... Long Stories - Post by : millionaire - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 3584

The Tragic Muse - Book 5 - Chapter 24 The Tragic Muse - Book 5 - Chapter 24

The Tragic Muse - Book 5 - Chapter 24
BOOK FIFTH. CHAPTER XXIV.His counsellor had plenty of further opportunity to develop this and other figurative remarks, for he not only spent several of the middle hours of the day at the studio, but came back in the evening--the pair had dined together at a little foreign pothouse in Soho, revealed to Nick on this occasion--and discussed the great question far into the night. The great question was whether, on the showing of those examples of his ability with which the scene of their discourse was now densely bestrewn, Nick Dormer would be justified in "really going in" for the practice... Long Stories - Post by : steve1.smith - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 1214

The Tragic Muse - Book 5 - Chapter 23 The Tragic Muse - Book 5 - Chapter 23

The Tragic Muse - Book 5 - Chapter 23
BOOK FIFTH. CHAPTER XXIII.It was certainly singular, in the light of other matters, that on sitting down in his studio after she had left town Nick should not, as regards the effort to project plastically some beautiful form, have felt more chilled by the absence of a friend who was such an embodiment of beauty. She was away and he missed her and longed for her, and yet without her the place was more filled with what he wanted to find in it. He turned into it with confused feelings, the strongest of which was a sense of release and recreation.... Long Stories - Post by : macrobjd - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 1062

The Tragic Muse - Book 5 - Chapter 22 The Tragic Muse - Book 5 - Chapter 22

The Tragic Muse - Book 5 - Chapter 22
BOOK FIFTH. CHAPTER XXII.Mrs. Dallow came up to London soon after the meeting of Parliament; she made no secret of the fact that she was fond of "town" and that in present conditions it would of course not have become less attractive to her. But she prepared to retreat again for the Easter vacation, not to go back to Harsh, but to pay a couple of country visits. She did not, however, depart with the crowd--she never did anything with the crowd--but waited till the Monday after Parliament rose; facing with composure, in Great Stanhope Street, the horrors, as she had... Long Stories - Post by : Inet2005 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 1536

The Tragic Muse - Book 4 - Chapter 21 The Tragic Muse - Book 4 - Chapter 21

The Tragic Muse - Book 4 - Chapter 21
BOOK FOURTH. CHAPTER XXI.Whether he had prearranged it is more than I can say, but Mademoiselle Voisin delayed so long to show herself that Mrs. Rooth, who wished to see the rest of the play, though she had sat it out on another occasion, expressed a returning relish for her corner of the _baignoire and gave her conductor the best pretext he could have desired for asking Basil Dashwood to be so good as to escort her back. When the young actor, of whose personal preference Peter was quite aware, had led Mrs. Rooth away with an absence of moroseness which... Long Stories - Post by : raamakants - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 3243

The Tragic Muse - Book 4 - Chapter 20 The Tragic Muse - Book 4 - Chapter 20

The Tragic Muse - Book 4 - Chapter 20
BOOK FOURTH. CHAPTER XX.As many people know, there are not, in the famous Theatre Francais, more than a dozen good seats accessible to ladies.(*) The stalls are forbidden them, the boxes are a quarter of a mile from the stage and the balcony is a delusion save for a few chairs at either end of its vast horseshoe. But there are two excellent _baignoires d'avant-scene_, which indeed are by no means always to be had. It was, however, into one of them that, immediately after his return to Paris, Sherringham ushered Mrs. Rooth and her daughter, with the further escort of... Long Stories - Post by : byoaudio - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 1716

The Tragic Muse - Book 4 - Chapter 19 The Tragic Muse - Book 4 - Chapter 19

The Tragic Muse - Book 4 - Chapter 19
BOOK FOURTH. CHAPTER XIX.When he got into the street he looked about him for a cab, but was obliged to walk some distance before encountering one. In this little interval he saw no reason to modify the determination he had formed in descending the steep staircase of the Hotel de la Garonne; indeed the desire prompting it only quickened his pace. He had an hour to spare and would also go to see Madame Carre. If Miriam and her companion had proceeded to the Rue de Constantinople on foot he would probably reach the house as soon as they. It was... Long Stories - Post by : bakari - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 968

The Tragic Muse - Book 4 - Chapter 18 The Tragic Muse - Book 4 - Chapter 18

The Tragic Muse - Book 4 - Chapter 18
BOOK FOURTH. CHAPTER XVIII.At first Peter Sherringham thought of asking to be transferred to another post and went so far, in London, as to take what he believed good advice on the subject. The advice, perhaps struck him as the better for consisting of a strong recommendation to do nothing so foolish. Two or three reasons were mentioned to him why such a request would not, in the particular circumstances, raise him in the esteem of his superiors, and he promptly recognised their force. He next became aware that it might help him--not with his superiors but with himself--to apply for... Long Stories - Post by : pandj - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 951

The Tragic Muse - Book 3 - Chapter 17 The Tragic Muse - Book 3 - Chapter 17

The Tragic Muse - Book 3 - Chapter 17
BOOK THIRD. CHAPTER XVII.Nick's little visit was to terminate immediately after luncheon the following day: much as the old man enjoyed his being there he wouldn't have dreamed of asking for more of his time now that it had such great public uses. He liked infinitely better that his young friend should be occupied with parliamentary work than only occupied in talking it over with him. Talking it over, however, was the next best thing, as on the morrow, after breakfast, Mr. Carteret showed Nick he considered. They sat in the garden, the morning being warm, and the old man had... Long Stories - Post by : alderson_mark - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 675

The Tragic Muse - Book 3 - Chapter 16 The Tragic Muse - Book 3 - Chapter 16

The Tragic Muse - Book 3 - Chapter 16
BOOK THIRD. CHAPTER XVI.He lost no time in going down to see Mr. Carteret, to whom he had written immediately after the election and who had answered him in twelve revised pages of historical parallel. He used often to envy Mr. Carteret's leisure, a sense of which came to him now afresh, in the summer evening, as he walked up the hill toward the quiet house where enjoyment had ever been mingled for him with a vague oppression. He was a little boy again, under Mr. Carteret's roof--a little boy on whom it had been duly impressed that in the wide,... Long Stories - Post by : Maxfreesurfing - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 1457

The Tragic Muse - Book 3 - Chapter 15 The Tragic Muse - Book 3 - Chapter 15

The Tragic Muse - Book 3 - Chapter 15
BOOK THIRD. CHAPTER XV.While, after leaving Mrs. Gresham, he was hesitating which way to go and was on the point of hailing a gardener to ask if Mrs. Dallow had been seen, he noticed, as a spot of colour in an expanse of shrubbery, a far-away parasol moving in the direction of the lake. He took his course toward it across the park, and as the bearer of the parasol strolled slowly it was not five minutes before he had joined her. He went to her soundlessly, on the grass--he had been whistling at first, but as he got nearer stopped--and... Long Stories - Post by : dwierman - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 1419

The Tragic Muse - Book 3 - Chapter 14 The Tragic Muse - Book 3 - Chapter 14

The Tragic Muse - Book 3 - Chapter 14
BOOK THIRD. CHAPTER XIV.The next morning brought the young man many letters and telegrams, and his coffee was placed beside him in his room he remained until noon answering these communications. When he came out he learned that his mother and sisters had left the house. This information was given him by Mrs. Gresham, whom he found dealing with her own voluminous budget at one of the tables in the library. She was a lady who received thirty letters a day, the subject-matter of which, as well as of her punctual answers in a hand that would have been "ladylike"... Long Stories - Post by : peter_act - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 2399

The Tragic Muse - Book 3 - Chapter 13 The Tragic Muse - Book 3 - Chapter 13

The Tragic Muse - Book 3 - Chapter 13
BOOK THIRD. CHAPTER XIII.The drive from Harsh to the Place, as it was called thereabouts, could be achieved by swift horses in less than ten minutes; and if Mrs. Dallow's ponies were capital trotters the general high pitch of the occasion made it all congruous they should show their speed. The occasion was the polling-day an hour after the battle. The ponies had kept pace with other driven forces for the week before, passing and repassing the neat windows of the flat little town--Mrs. Dallow had the complacent belief that there was none in the kingdom in which the flower-stands looked... Long Stories - Post by : James_Brausch - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 3413

The Tragic Muse - Book 2 - Chapter 12 The Tragic Muse - Book 2 - Chapter 12

The Tragic Muse - Book 2 - Chapter 12
BOOK SECOND. CHAPTER XII.The summer arrived and the dense air of the Paris theatres became in fact a still more complicated mixture; yet the occasions were not few on which Sherringham, having placed a box near the stage (most often a stuffy, dusky _baignoire_) at the disposal of Mrs. Rooth and her daughter, found time just to look in, as he said, to spend a part of the evening with them and point the moral of the performance. The pieces, the successes of the winter, had entered the automatic phase: they went on by the force of the impetus acquired, deriving... Long Stories - Post by : davdlwh - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 1380