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The Tragic Muse - Book 8 - Chapter 51 The Tragic Muse - Book 8 - Chapter 51

The Tragic Muse - Book 8 - Chapter 51
BOOK EIGHTH. CHAPTER LI.That night at the theatre and in the box--the miracle had been wrought, the treasure found--Nick Dormer pointed out to his two companions the stall he had relinquished, which was close in front; noting how oddly it remained during the whole of the first act vacant. The house was beyond everything, the actress beyond any one; though to describe again so famous an occasion--it has been described repeatedly by other reporters--is not in the compass of the closing words of a history already too sustained. It is enough to say that these great hours marked an era in... Long Stories - Post by : mjsimpson - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 2464

The Tragic Muse - Book 8 - Chapter 50 The Tragic Muse - Book 8 - Chapter 50

The Tragic Muse - Book 8 - Chapter 50
BOOK EIGHTH. CHAPTER L.One day toward the end of March of the following year, in other words more than six months after Mr. Nash's disappearance, Bridget Dormer came into her brother's studio and greeted him with the effusion that accompanies a return from an absence. She had been staying at Broadwood--she had been staying at Harsh. She had various things to tell him about these episodes, about his mother, about Grace, about her small subterraneous self, and about Percy's having come, just before, over to Broadwood for two days; the longest visit with which, almost since they could remember, the head... Long Stories - Post by : annas - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 972

The Tragic Muse - Book 8 - Chapter 49 The Tragic Muse - Book 8 - Chapter 49

The Tragic Muse - Book 8 - Chapter 49
BOOK EIGHTH. CHAPTER XLIX.She had guessed happily in saying to him that to offer to paint Gabriel Nash would be the way to get rid of that visitant. It was with no such invidious purpose indeed that our young man proposed to his intermittent friend to sit; rather, as August was dusty in the London streets, he had too little hope that Nash would remain in town at such a time to oblige him. Nick had no wish to get rid of his private philosopher; he liked his philosophy, and though of course premeditated paradox was the light to read him... Long Stories - Post by : guardian - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 2260

The Tragic Muse - Book 8 - Chapter 48 The Tragic Muse - Book 8 - Chapter 48

The Tragic Muse - Book 8 - Chapter 48
BOOK EIGHTH. CHAPTER XLVIII.Miriam had mounted at a bound, in her new part, several steps in the ladder of fame, and at the climax of the London season this fact was brought home to her from hour to hour. It produced a thousand solicitations and entanglements, and she rapidly learned that to be celebrated takes up almost as much of one's own time as of other people's. Even though, as she boasted, she had reduced to a science the practice of "working" her mother--she made use of the good lady socially to the utmost, pushing her perpetually into the breach--there was... Long Stories - Post by : stevewylie - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 1587

The Tragic Muse - Book 8 - Chapter 47 The Tragic Muse - Book 8 - Chapter 47

The Tragic Muse - Book 8 - Chapter 47
BOOK EIGHTH. CHAPTER XLVII.When Mrs. Dallow returned to London just before London broke up the fact was immediately known in Calcutta Gardens and was promptly communicated to Nick Dormer by his sister Bridget. He had learnt it in no other way--he had had no correspondence with Julia during her absence. He gathered that his mother and sisters were not ignorant of her whereabouts--he never mentioned her name to them--but as to this he was not sure if the source of their information had been the _Morning Post or a casual letter received by the inscrutable Biddy. He knew Biddy had some... Long Stories - Post by : BigTed - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 2426

The Tragic Muse - Book 7 - Chapter 46 The Tragic Muse - Book 7 - Chapter 46

The Tragic Muse - Book 7 - Chapter 46
BOOK SEVENTH. CHAPTER XLVI.Peter meanwhile rolled away through the summer night to Saint John's Wood. He had put the pressure of strong words on his young friend, entreating her to drive home immediately, return there without any one, without even her mother. He wished to see her alone and for a purpose he would fully and satisfactorily explain--couldn't she trust him? He besought her to remember his own situation and throw over her supper, throw over everything. He would wait for her with unspeakable impatience in Balaklava Place.He did so, when he got there, but it had taken half an hour.... Long Stories - Post by : SuSue - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 836

The Tragic Muse - Book 7 - Chapter 45 The Tragic Muse - Book 7 - Chapter 45

The Tragic Muse - Book 7 - Chapter 45
BOOK SEVENTH. CHAPTER XLVPeter Sherringham said so little during the performance that his companion was struck by his dumbness, especially as Miriam's acting seemed to Nick magnificent. He held his breath while she was on the stage--she gave the whole thing, including the spectator's emotion, such a lift. She had not carried out her fantastic menace of not exerting herself, and, as Mrs. Rooth had said, it little mattered for whom she acted. Nick was conscious in watching her that she went through it all for herself, for the idea that possessed her and that she rendered with extraordinary breadth. She... Long Stories - Post by : Pete12 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 2416

The Tragic Muse - Book 7 - Chapter 44 The Tragic Muse - Book 7 - Chapter 44

The Tragic Muse - Book 7 - Chapter 44
BOOK SEVENTH. CHAPTER XLIV.At the entrance of Miriam and her mother Nick, in the studio, had stopped whistling, but he was still gay enough to receive them with every appearance of warmth. He thought it a poor place, ungarnished, untapestried, a bare, almost grim workshop, with all its revelations and honours still to come. But his visitors smiled on it a good deal in the same way in which they had smiled on Bridget Dormer when they met her at the door: Mrs. Rooth because vague, prudent approbation was the habit of her foolish face--it was ever the least danger; and... Long Stories - Post by : ultimate_warrio - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 1404

The Tragic Muse - Book 7 - Chapter 43 The Tragic Muse - Book 7 - Chapter 43

The Tragic Muse - Book 7 - Chapter 43
BOOK SEVENTH. CHAPTER XLIII."Come on boldly, my dear," said Nick. "Peter's bored to death waiting for you.""Ah he's come to say he won't dine with us to-night!" Biddy stood with her hand on the latch."I leave town to-morrow: I've everything to do; I'm broken-hearted; it's impossible"--Peter made of it again such a case as he could. "Please make my peace with your mother--I'm ashamed of not having written to her last night."She closed the door and came in while her brother said to her, "How in the world did you guess it?""I saw it in the _Morning Post_." And she kept... Long Stories - Post by : money2bmade - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 2388

The Tragic Muse - Book 7 - Chapter 42 The Tragic Muse - Book 7 - Chapter 42

The Tragic Muse - Book 7 - Chapter 42
BOOK SEVENTH. CHAPTER XLII.Nick Dormer had for the hour quite taken up his abode at his studio Biddy usually arrived after breakfast to give him news of the state of affairs in Calcutta Gardens and where many letters and telegrams were now addressed him. Among such missives, on the morning of the Saturday on which Peter Sherringham had promised to dine at the other house, was a note from Miriam Rooth, informing Nick that if he shouldn't telegraph to put her off she would turn up about half-past eleven, probably with her mother, for just one more sitting. She added... Long Stories - Post by : lyndonfriend - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 1234

The Tragic Muse - Book 6 - Chapter 41 The Tragic Muse - Book 6 - Chapter 41

The Tragic Muse - Book 6 - Chapter 41
BOOK SIX. CHAPTER XLI."I don't know; I haven't the least idea; I don't care; don't ask me!"--it was so he met some immediate appeal of her artistic egotism, some challenge of his impression of her at this and that moment. Hadn't she frankly better give up such and such a point and return to their first idea, the one they had talked over so much? Peter replied to this that he disowned all ideas; that at any rate he should never have another as long as he lived, and that, so help him heaven, they had worried that hard bone more... Long Stories - Post by : msdobe - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 2149

The Tragic Muse - Book 6 - Chapter 40 The Tragic Muse - Book 6 - Chapter 40

The Tragic Muse - Book 6 - Chapter 40
BOOK SIX. CHAPTER XL.Lady Agnes would doubtless have done better, in her own interest or in that of her child, to have secured his company for the very next evening. This she had indeed attempted, but her application of her thought had miscarried, Peter bethinking himself that he was importantly engaged. Her ladyship, moreover, couldn't presume to answer for Nick, since after all they must of course _have Nick, though, to tell the truth, the hideous truth, she and her son were scarcely on terms. Peter insisted on Nick, wished particularly to see him, and gave his hostess notice that he... Long Stories - Post by : John_Ellis - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 2634

The Tragic Muse - Book 6 - Chapter 39 The Tragic Muse - Book 6 - Chapter 39

The Tragic Muse - Book 6 - Chapter 39
BOOK SIX. CHAPTER XXXIX.The next thing he meanwhile did was to call with his news on Lady Agnes Dormer; it is not unworthy of note that he took on the other hand no step to make his promotion known to Miriam Rooth. To render it probable he should find his aunt he went at the luncheon-hour; and she was indeed on the point of sitting down to that repast with Grace. Biddy was not at home--Biddy was never at home now, her mother said: she was always at Nick's place, she spent her life there, she ate and drank there, she... Long Stories - Post by : Laid_back - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 1000

The Tragic Muse - Book 6 - Chapter 38 The Tragic Muse - Book 6 - Chapter 38

The Tragic Muse - Book 6 - Chapter 38
BOOK SIX. CHAPTER XXXVIIIHe wouldn't for a moment have admitted that he was jealous of his old comrade, but would almost have liked to be accused of it: for this would have given him a chance he rather lacked and missed, the right occasion to declare with plausibility that motives he couldn't avow had no application to his case. How could a man be jealous when he was not a suitor? how could he pretend to guard a property which was neither his own nor destined to become his own? There could be no question of loss when one had nothing... Long Stories - Post by : 62495 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 1796

The Tragic Muse - Book 6 - Chapter 37 The Tragic Muse - Book 6 - Chapter 37

The Tragic Muse - Book 6 - Chapter 37
BOOK SIX. CHAPTER XXXVII."Judge for yourself when you get a chance," Nash had said to him; and as it turned out he was able to judge two days later, for he found his cousin in Balaklava Place on the Tuesday following his walk with their insufferable friend. He had not only stayed away from the theatre on the Monday evening--he regarded this as an achievement of some importance--but had not been near Miriam during the day. He had meant to absent himself from her company on Tuesday as well; a determination confirmed by the fact that the afternoon turned to rain.... Long Stories - Post by : thecollector - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 1609

The Tragic Muse - Book 6 - Chapter 36 The Tragic Muse - Book 6 - Chapter 36

The Tragic Muse - Book 6 - Chapter 36
BOOK SIX. CHAPTER XXXVI.The night Peter Sherringham walked away from Balaklava Place with Gabriel Nash the talk of the two men directed itself, as was natural at the time, to the question of Miriam's future fame and the pace, as Nash called it, at which she would go. Critical spirits as they both were, and one of them as dissimulative in passion as the other was paradoxical in the absence of it, they yet took her career for granted as completely as the simple-minded, a pair of hot spectators in the pit, might have done, and exchanged observations on the assumption... Long Stories - Post by : Slamy - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 1728

The Tragic Muse - Book 6 - Chapter 35 The Tragic Muse - Book 6 - Chapter 35

The Tragic Muse - Book 6 - Chapter 35
BOOK SIX. CHAPTER XXXV.That evening--the evening of his return from Beauclere--he was conscious of a keen desire to get away, to go abroad, to leave behind him the little chatter his resignation would be sure to produce in an age of publicity which never discriminated as to the quality of events. Then he felt it decidedly better to stay, to see the business through on the spot. Besides, he would have to meet his constituents--would a parcel of cheese-eating burgesses ever have been "met" on so queer an occasion?--and when that was over the incident would practically be closed. Nick had... Long Stories - Post by : winnerz - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 3403

The Tragic Muse - Book 6 - Chapter 34 The Tragic Muse - Book 6 - Chapter 34

The Tragic Muse - Book 6 - Chapter 34
BOOK SIX. CHAPTER XXXIV.The really formidable thing for Nick had been to tell his mother: a truth of which he was so conscious that he had the matter out with her the very morning he returned from Beauclere. She and Grace had come back the afternoon before from their own enjoyment of rural hospitality, and, knowing this--she had written him her intention from the country--he drove straight from the station to Calcutta Gardens. There was a little room on the right of the house-door known as his own room; but in which of a morning, when he was not at home,... Long Stories - Post by : SFIMG - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 3294

The Tragic Muse - Book 6 - Chapter 33 The Tragic Muse - Book 6 - Chapter 33

The Tragic Muse - Book 6 - Chapter 33
BOOK SIX. CHAPTER XXXIII.The rich old man was propped up on pillows, and in this attitude, beneath the high, spare canopy of his bed, presented himself to Nick's picture-seeking vision as a figure in a clever composition or a "story." He had gathered strength, though this strength was not much in his voice; it was mainly in his brighter eyes and his air of being pleased with himself. He put out his hand and said, "I daresay you know why I sent for you"; on which Nick sank into the seat he had occupied the day before, replying that he had... Long Stories - Post by : dd2207 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 2558

The Tragic Muse - Book 6 - Chapter 32 The Tragic Muse - Book 6 - Chapter 32

The Tragic Muse - Book 6 - Chapter 32
BOOK SIX. CHAPTER XXXII.It mattered not so much what the doctors thought--and Sir Matthew Hope, the greatest of them all, had been down twice in one week--as that Mr. Chayter, the omniscient butler, declared with all the authority of his position and his experience that Mr. Carteret was very bad indeed. Nick Dormer had a long talk with him--it lasted six minutes--the day he hurried to Beauclere in response to a telegram. It was Mr. Chayter who had taken upon himself to telegraph in spite of the presence in the house of Mr. Carteret's nearest relation and only surviving sister, Mrs.... Long Stories - Post by : paygiant - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 2514