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Full Online Book HomeAuthor Helen Leah ReedPage 1
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Religion. I-34 Religion. I-34

Religion. I-34
God's mean and careless servant--while I wander Deep in the madness of Philosophy,-- Now backward I must set my sail, and ponder Where my forsaken course retraced shall be. For Jupiter, who with his glittering fire So often cleaves apart the threatening clouds, His wingèd car and thundering horses higher Toward air has driven where no shadow shrouds. Whereat the sluggish earth, each vagrant river,-- The Styx, and hated Tænarus' dread abode, And the Atlantic borders shake and shiver.... Poems - Post by : pjr4664 - Date : November 2011 - Author : Helen Leah Reed - Read : 686

Lasting Fame. Iii-30 Lasting Fame. Iii-30

Lasting Fame. Iii-30
A monument outlasting brass I have builded, Higher than pyramids in their crumbling glory, That no devouring storm, nor futile North wind Can overthrow, nor years in long succession, Nor fleeting seasons. I shall not wholly perish. In great part I'll escape the funeral pyre; And lately praised, my praise will go on growing To latest years. As long as Priest and Vestal Ascend the Capitol, I shall be mentioned Where Aufidus fierce rages, and where Daunus A rustic race rules in an arid country. Great, though of humble birth,... Poems - Post by : karesh - Date : November 2011 - Author : Helen Leah Reed - Read : 1602

A Palinode. I-16 A Palinode. I-16

A Palinode. I-16
Oh, daughter, lovelier than your lovely mother, Whatever punishment you may desire Give my offending verses; in the fire Throw them, please you, or in the Adriatic. Not Dindymene, no, nor even Apollo So shakes the minds of priests within the shrine; Nor so disturbing is the God of wine, Nor Corybantes doubling their shrill cymbals, As direful fits of anger that are frightened Neither by Noric sword nor savage flame, Nor by ship-wrecking seas, nor them can tame... Poems - Post by : SRPatel - Date : November 2011 - Author : Helen Leah Reed - Read : 3554

To Venus. Iii-26 To Venus. Iii-26

To Venus. Iii-26
Lately was I to gentle maidens suited, And not without some glory did contend, But now my weapons and my lute made useless For contests, on this wall I will suspend, That guards the left side of our sea-born Venus; Here, here, place you my gleaming waxen torch, My levers and my crow-bars that can threaten The doors that ought to open on this porch. Oh, Goddess, thou who blessed Cyprus rulest, And Memphis ever lacking Thracian snow, My Queen, in... Poems - Post by : webbie - Date : November 2011 - Author : Helen Leah Reed - Read : 3389

To Fuscus. I-22 To Fuscus. I-22

To Fuscus. I-22
Oh, Fuscus, he whose life is pure and upright, Wants not the Moorish javelin nor the bow, Nor may he need the quiver, heavy laden With arrows poisoned for the lurking foe. Whether he is about to make a journey To sultry Libya, or the unfriendly height Of Caucasus, or to the distant places That famed Hydaspes washes in his flight. For lately me a wolf fled in the forest-- The Sabine forest, as my Lalage I sang about,--beyond my boundaries... Poems - Post by : MargaretD - Date : November 2011 - Author : Helen Leah Reed - Read : 1766

To Chloe. I-23 To Chloe. I-23

To Chloe. I-23
Ah Chloe, like a fawn you now elude me, Seeking its timid dam on lonely hills, Its dam who not without an idle tremor At breezes in the forest thrills. For if before the breeze the bushes quiver With rustling leaves, or if green lizards start Across the bramble, then it is it trembles,-- This little fawn--in knees and heart. But Chloe, I am not a cruel tiger, Nor a Gætulian lion, thee to chase; And now that thou art old... Poems - Post by : Atkinson - Date : November 2011 - Author : Helen Leah Reed - Read : 1807

To Thaliarchus. I-9 To Thaliarchus. I-9

To Thaliarchus. I-9
You see how our Soracte now is standing Hoary with heavy snow, and now its weight To bear the struggling woods are hardly able, And with the bitter cold the streams stagnate. The cold melt thou away, oh, Thaliarchus, By heaping logs upon thy fire, again Replenishing, and from a Sabine flagon Wine of a four years' vintage draw thou then. Leave to the gods the rest; for at the moment They felled the winds upon the boiling sea That battled... Poems - Post by : stock - Date : November 2011 - Author : Helen Leah Reed - Read : 2198

To Censorinus. Iv-8 To Censorinus. Iv-8

To Censorinus. Iv-8
With kindly thought I'd give, Oh Censorinus, Bowls and bronze vases pleasing to each friend; Tripods I'd offer, prizes of brave Grecians, And not the worst of gifts to you I'd send Were I, forsooth, rich in such artist's treasure As Scopas and Parrhasius could convey, This one in stone, and that in liquid color, Skilled here a man,--a god there to portray. But mine no power like this, nor does your spirit Or your affairs need luxuries so choice. Songs... Poems - Post by : TimShultz - Date : November 2011 - Author : Helen Leah Reed - Read : 2117

Horace And Lydia. Iii-9 Horace And Lydia. Iii-9

Horace And Lydia. Iii-9
"One time when I was pleasing to you, Lydia, And when no other youth, preferred to me, Your snowy neck could with his arms encircle, Then happier I than Persia's King may be." "When of another you were less enamored, Nor ranked me after Chloe in your love, Then I, your Lydia, of wide reputation, Than Roman Ilia more renowned could prove." "Now Thracian Chloe, skilled in mellow measures, And expert on the harp, holds me her slave, To die for... Poems - Post by : Driven - Date : November 2011 - Author : Helen Leah Reed - Read : 1210

To Melpomene. Iv-3 To Melpomene. Iv-3

To Melpomene. Iv-3
Oh, him whom at birth you with favor regarded Melpomene! never an Isthmian game Shall render renowned, though he's skilled as a boxer, Nor shall a swift horse lead him onward to fame. Though a victor he rides in a chariot Achaian, Not him shall the fortune of war ever show. In the Capitol wearing the garland of laurel Because the proud threatenings of kings he laid low. But every stream flowing over the country Fertile Tibur around, and so every grove... Poems - Post by : 54650 - Date : November 2011 - Author : Helen Leah Reed - Read : 1211

To Diana. Iii-22 To Diana. Iii-22

To Diana. Iii-22
Diana, Protector of mountain and wood, Who when three times invoked, hast so well understood, And young mothers in child-birth hast rescued from death, Goddess, triply endowed! Let this tree overhanging my house here, this pine Be for thee, that each year I shall consecrate thine, Happy still--with the blood of a boar, whose last breath, Planned a side-long attack.(The end)Helen Leah Reed's poem: To Diana. III-22... Poems - Post by : lumore - Date : November 2011 - Author : Helen Leah Reed - Read : 1816

To Apollo. I-31 To Apollo. I-31

To Apollo. I-31
What prays the poet of enshrined Apollo? What is he asking for with lifted hands, Pouring a fresh libation from his flagon?-- Not fertile crop from rich Sardinian lands,-- Not the fair herds of sultry, damp Calabria,-- Not even Indian ivory and gold;-- Nor meadows that the Liris, silent river, With sluggish flow has nibbled, as it rolled. Let those whom Fortune has endowed with vineyards, With the Calenian knife their grapevines trim, Let the rich merchant from his golden goblet... Poems - Post by : Larry_R._Simons - Date : November 2011 - Author : Helen Leah Reed - Read : 2402

To The State. I-14 To The State. I-14

To The State. I-14
Oh! Ship of State! fresh billows to sea will bear thee back, Then turn about and bravely toward the harbor tack, Thou see'st that thy naked sides defending oarsmen lack. Behold! thy mast lies shattered before the swift south wind, Listen! the yards are creaking, the ropes no longer bind, Strength to endure the boisterous waves thy keel can hardly find. Now all thy sails are ragged; the gods are swept away To whom, borne down by peril, thy quaking soul would pray. Though lofty be thy lineage, its pride is vain today.... Poems - Post by : nenbrown - Date : November 2011 - Author : Helen Leah Reed - Read : 2738

Hardy Youth. Iii-2 Hardy Youth. Iii-2

Hardy Youth. Iii-2
The hardy youth, my friends, in bitter warfare To narrow poverty must learn to bend, And, for his spear a horseman to be dreaded, Courageous Parthians into flight must send. And he must try all dangerous adventures, His life out in the open he must pass; The warring tyrant's wife and growing daughter Him spying from their hostile walls, "Alas," They sigh--for fear the royal husband, Unskilled in warlike arts, should dare attack This lion, fierce to touch, whom bloody anger... Poems - Post by : Riggie - Date : November 2011 - Author : Helen Leah Reed - Read : 3523

To Neobulé. Iii-12 To Neobulé. Iii-12

To Neobulé. Iii-12
Ah! Unhappy are the maidens, who love's game are kept from playing, Nor in mellow wine may wash away their cares; Who, scared by scolding uncles' tongues, their terror are displaying,-- But from you, though, Neobulé, Cupid bears Your basket and your webs, yet all the zeal you have been showing For industrious Minerva, is the prey Of fair Hebrus, Liparæan, when his shoulders, oiled and glowing, He has bathed in Tiber's waters. Let me say As a horseman, than Bellerophon he's really something greater;... Poems - Post by : xenfasa - Date : November 2011 - Author : Helen Leah Reed - Read : 2116

To Leuconoë--i-11 To Leuconoë--i-11

To Leuconoë--i-11
Seek not to learn--Leuconoë,--a mortal may not know-- What term of life on you or me our deities bestow. The Babylonian soothsayer consult not; better bear Whatever comes, whether to you more winters Jove shall spare, Or whether this may be the last, grinding the Tuscan sea On yonder rocks. Even as we talk, time envious shall flee. Filter your wine, be wise, and clip your hopes to life's brief span. Then seize today; to-morrow trust as little as you can.(The end)Helen Leah Reed's poem: To Leuconoë--I-11... Poems - Post by : hg31960 - Date : November 2011 - Author : Helen Leah Reed - Read : 2763

To Mæcenas. Iii-29 To Mæcenas. Iii-29

To Mæcenas. Iii-29
Mæcenas, scion of Tyrrhenian rulers, A jar, as yet unpierced, of mellow wine Long waits thee here, with balm for thee made ready And blooming roses in thy locks to twine. No more delay, nor always look with favor The sloping fields of Æsula upon; Why gaze so long on ever marshy Tibur Near by the mount of murderer Telegon? Give up thy luxury--it palls upon thee-- Thy tower that reaches yonder lofty cloud; Cease to admire the smoke, the wealth,... Poems - Post by : richy20 - Date : November 2011 - Author : Helen Leah Reed - Read : 1195

The Rivals The Rivals

The Rivals
Said the Bicycle to the Automobile: "How high and mighty and gay you feel; Yet I can remember the day when I Would let no other one pass me by Cart horse and roadster and racehorse too, Far ahead of them all I flew. Now my tires are unpumped and my warning bell The attention of nobody can compel. "Though you maim your thousands where I hurt one, Though ten times my farthest is your day's run, Still I have been learning while lying here, That a rival's coming for... Poems - Post by : hotlinkz - Date : November 2011 - Author : Helen Leah Reed - Read : 2856

A Hero A Hero

A Hero
Like many another I have crossed Oftener than once the broad Atlantic, And--feeling qualms when tempest-tossed, Have shuddered at the waves gigantic, Fearing that really nevermore I'd find myself again ashore. Then when--upset--and scarce awake, In moments of perturbed reflection, My wandering thoughts would slowly take Time and again the same direction. I'd think of that adventurous man, Who crossed the sea--first of my clan.... Poems - Post by : razztek - Date : November 2011 - Author : Helen Leah Reed - Read : 3456

A Liberty Bond A Liberty Bond

A Liberty Bond
A liberty bond! What a queer contradiction! Although truth, as you've heard, may be stranger than fiction. For Liberty should from all fetters release us, While bonds hold one fast, whether pauper or Croesus. Yet a Liberty Bond--I'd advise you to buy it-- Will ensure you your freedom--you'll see when you try it. 'Twill aid you to conquer foes cruel, despotic, 'Twill help save your Country, come, be patriotic! A Liberty Bond--I'd advise you to buy one-- Will ensure you your freedom--rejoice when you try one!(The end)Helen Leah Reed's poem: Liberty Bond... Poems - Post by : jon1my - Date : November 2011 - Author : Helen Leah Reed - Read : 1636