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Sunny Memories Of Foreign Lands, Volume 2 - Letter 49 Sunny Memories Of Foreign Lands, Volume 2 - Letter 49

Sunny Memories Of Foreign Lands, Volume 2 - Letter 49
LETTER XLIXLONDON.MY DEAR:--Our last letters from home changed all our plans. We concluded to hurry away by the next steamer, if at that late hour we could get passage. We were all in a bustle. The last shoppings for aunts, cousins, and little folks were to be done by us all. The Palais Royal was to be rummaged; bronzes, vases, statuettes, bonbons, playthings--all that the endless fertility of France could show--was to be looked over for the "folks at home."You ought to have seen our rooms at night, the last evening we spent in Paris. When the whole gleanings of a... Nonfictions - Post by : Truman - Date : May 2012 - Author : Harriet Beecher Stowe - Read : 2803

Sunny Memories Of Foreign Lands, Volume 2 - Letter 48 Sunny Memories Of Foreign Lands, Volume 2 - Letter 48

Sunny Memories Of Foreign Lands, Volume 2 - Letter 48
LETTER XLVIIIPARIS, Saturday, August 20.MY DEAR:--I am seated in my snug little room at M. Belloc's. The weather is overpoweringly hot, but these Parisian houses seem to have seized and imprisoned coolness. French household ways are delightful. I like their seclusion from the street, by these deep-paved quadrangles. I like these cool, smooth, waxed floors so much that I one day queried with my friends, the C.'s, whether we could not introduce them into America. L., who is a Yankee housekeeper, answered, with spirit, "No, indeed; not while the mistress of the house has every thing to do, as in America;... Nonfictions - Post by : simkl - Date : May 2012 - Author : Harriet Beecher Stowe - Read : 1385

Sunny Memories Of Foreign Lands, Volume 2 - Letter 47 Sunny Memories Of Foreign Lands, Volume 2 - Letter 47

Sunny Memories Of Foreign Lands, Volume 2 - Letter 47
LETTER XLVIIAntwerp.MY DEAR:--Of all quaint places this is one of the most charming. I have been rather troubled that antiquity has fled before me where I have gone. It is a fatality of travelling that the sense of novelty dies away, so that we do not realize that we are seeing any thing extraordinary. I wanted to see something as quaint as Nuremberg in Longfellow's poem, and have but just found it. These high-gabled old Flemish houses, nine steps to each gable! The cathedral, too, affects me more in externals than any yet. And the spire looks as I expected that... Nonfictions - Post by : sbeard - Date : May 2012 - Author : Harriet Beecher Stowe - Read : 2328

Sunny Memories Of Foreign Lands, Volume 2 - Letter 46 Sunny Memories Of Foreign Lands, Volume 2 - Letter 46

Sunny Memories Of Foreign Lands, Volume 2 - Letter 46
LETTER XLVIERFURT, Saturday Evening.MY DEAR:--I have just been to Luther's cell in the old Augustine Convent, and if my pilgrimage at Wittenberg was less interesting by the dirt and discomfort of the actual present, here were surroundings less calculated to jar on the frame the scene should inspire. It was about sunset,--a very golden and beautiful one, and C. and I drove through various streets of this old town. I believe I am peculiarly alive to architectural excitements, for these old houses, with their strange windows, odd chimneys, and quaint carvings, delight me wonderfully. Many of them are almost gnome-like in... Nonfictions - Post by : best4you - Date : May 2012 - Author : Harriet Beecher Stowe - Read : 2889

Sunny Memories Of Foreign Lands, Volume 2 - Letter 45 Sunny Memories Of Foreign Lands, Volume 2 - Letter 45

Sunny Memories Of Foreign Lands, Volume 2 - Letter 45
LETTER XLVWITTENBERG.MY DEAR:--I am here in the station house at Wittenberg. I have been seeing and hearing to-day for you, and now sit down to put on paper the results of my morning. "What make you from Wittenberg?" Wittenberg! name of the dreamy past; dimly associated with Hamlet, Denmark, the moonlight terrace, and the Baltic Sea, by one line of Shakspeare; but made more living by those who have thought, loved, and died here; nay, by those who cannot die, and whose life has been life to all coming ages.How naturally, on reaching a place long heard of and pondered, do... Nonfictions - Post by : gabby - Date : May 2012 - Author : Harriet Beecher Stowe - Read : 2554

Sunny Memories Of Foreign Lands, Volume 2 - Letter 44 Sunny Memories Of Foreign Lands, Volume 2 - Letter 44

Sunny Memories Of Foreign Lands, Volume 2 - Letter 44
LETTER XLIVBERLIN, August 10.MY DEAR:--Here we are in Berlin--a beautiful city. These places that kings build, have of course, more general uniformity and consistency of style than those that grow up by chance. The prevalence of the Greek style of architecture, the regularity and breadth of the streets, the fine trees, especially in the Unter den Linden, on which are our rooms, struck me more than any thing I have seen since Paris. Why Paris charms me so much more than other cities of similar recommendations, I cannot say, any more than a man can tell why he is fascinated by... Nonfictions - Post by : Truman - Date : May 2012 - Author : Harriet Beecher Stowe - Read : 2004

Sunny Memories Of Foreign Lands, Volume 2 - Letter 43 Sunny Memories Of Foreign Lands, Volume 2 - Letter 43

Sunny Memories Of Foreign Lands, Volume 2 - Letter 43
LETTER XLIIIDRESDEN.DEAR:--I went to Dresden as an art-pilgrim, principally to see Raphael's great picture of the Madonna di San Sisto, supposing that to be the best specimen of his genius out of Italy. On my way I diligently studied the guide book of that indefatigable friend of the traveller, Mr. Murray, in which descriptions of the finest pictures are given, with the observations of artists; so that inexperienced persons may know exactly what to think, and where to think it. My expectations had been so often disappointed, that my pulse was somewhat calmer. Nevertheless, the glowing eulogiums of these celebrated artists... Nonfictions - Post by : Dusty13 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Harriet Beecher Stowe - Read : 2824

Sunny Memories Of Foreign Lands, Volume 2 - Letter 42 Sunny Memories Of Foreign Lands, Volume 2 - Letter 42

Sunny Memories Of Foreign Lands, Volume 2 - Letter 42
LETTER XLIICOLOGNE, 10 o'clock, Hotel Bellevue.DEAR:--The great old city is before me, looming up across the Rhine, which lies spread out like a molten looking glass, all quivering and wavering, reflecting the thousand lights of the city. We have been on the Rhine all day, gliding among its picture-like scenes. But, alas I I had a headache; the boat was crowded; one and all smoked tobacco; and in vain, under such circumstances, do we see that nature is fair. It is not enough to open one's eyes on scenes; one must be able to be _en rapport with them. Just so... Nonfictions - Post by : runtonk - Date : May 2012 - Author : Harriet Beecher Stowe - Read : 1565

Sunny Memories Of Foreign Lands, Volume 2 - Letter 41 Sunny Memories Of Foreign Lands, Volume 2 - Letter 41

Sunny Memories Of Foreign Lands, Volume 2 - Letter 41
LETTER XLIDEAR:--To-day we came to Frankfort, and this afternoon we have been driving out to see the lions, and in the first place the house where Goethe was born. Over the door, you remember, was the family coat of arms. Well, while we were looking I perceived that a little bird had accommodated the crest of the coat to be his own family residence, and was flying in and out of a snug nest wherewith he had crowned it. Little fanciful, feathery amateur! could nothing suit him so well as Goethe's coat of arms? I could fancy the little thing to... Nonfictions - Post by : sbeard - Date : May 2012 - Author : Harriet Beecher Stowe - Read : 1079

Sunny Memories Of Foreign Lands, Volume 2 - Letter 40 Sunny Memories Of Foreign Lands, Volume 2 - Letter 40

Sunny Memories Of Foreign Lands, Volume 2 - Letter 40
LETTER XLHEIDELBERG.MY DEAR:--To-day we made our first essay on the Rhine. Switzerland is a poor preparation for admiring any common scenery; but the Rhine from Strasbourg to Manheim seemed only a muddy strip of water, with low banks, poplars, and willows. If there was any thing better, we passed it while I was asleep; for I did sleep, even on the classic Rhine.Day before yesterday, at Basle, I went into the museum, and there saw some original fragments of the Dance of Death, and many other pictures by Holbein, with two miniature likenesses of Luther and his wife, by Lucas Cranach;... Nonfictions - Post by : Ndoki - Date : May 2012 - Author : Harriet Beecher Stowe - Read : 1243

Sunny Memories Of Foreign Lands, Volume 2 - Letter 39 Sunny Memories Of Foreign Lands, Volume 2 - Letter 39

Sunny Memories Of Foreign Lands, Volume 2 - Letter 39
LETTER XXXIXSTRASBOURG.MY DEAR:--We arrived here this evening. I left the cars with my head full of the cathedral. The first thing I saw, on lifting my eyes, was a brown spire. Said I,--"C., do you think that can be the cathedral spire?""Yes, that must be it.""I am afraid it is," said I, doubtfully, as I felt, within, that dissolving of airy visions which I have generally found the first sensation on visiting any celebrated object.The thing looked entirely too low and too broad for what I had heard of its marvellous grace and lightness; nay, some mischievous elf even whispered the... Nonfictions - Post by : sbeard - Date : May 2012 - Author : Harriet Beecher Stowe - Read : 1970

Sunny Memories Of Foreign Lands, Volume 2 - Letter 38 Sunny Memories Of Foreign Lands, Volume 2 - Letter 38

Sunny Memories Of Foreign Lands, Volume 2 - Letter 38
LETTER XXXVIIIDEAR CHILDREN:--To-day we have been in the Wengern Alps--the scenes described in Manfred. Imagine us mounting, about ten o'clock, from the valley of Lauterbrunn, on horseback--our party of three--with two guides. We had first been to see the famous Staubbach, a beautiful, though not sublime, object. Up we began to go among those green undulations which form the lower part of the mountain.(Illustration: _of narrow, high alpine meadows with grazing livestock._)It is haying time; a bright day; all is cheerful; the birds sing; men, women, and children are busy in the field. Up we go, zigzag; it grows steeper and... Nonfictions - Post by : ow24160 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Harriet Beecher Stowe - Read : 1864

Sunny Memories Of Foreign Lands, Volume 2 - Letter 37 Sunny Memories Of Foreign Lands, Volume 2 - Letter 37

Sunny Memories Of Foreign Lands, Volume 2 - Letter 37
LETTER XXXVIIHOTEL BYRON.MY DEAR:--Here I am, sitting at my window, overlooking Lake Leman. Castle Chillon, with its old conical towers, is silently pictured in the still waters. It has been a day of a thousand. We took a boat, with two oarsmen, and passed leisurely along the shores, under the cool, drooping branches of trees, to the castle, which is scarce a stone's throw from the hotel. We rowed along, close under the walls, to the ancient moat and drawbridge. There I picked a bunch of blue bells, "les clochettes," which were hanging their aerial pendants from every crevice--some blue, some... Nonfictions - Post by : Ndoki - Date : May 2012 - Author : Harriet Beecher Stowe - Read : 1255

Sunny Memories Of Foreign Lands, Volume 2 - Letter 36 Sunny Memories Of Foreign Lands, Volume 2 - Letter 36

Sunny Memories Of Foreign Lands, Volume 2 - Letter 36
LETTER XXXVIDear:--During breakfast, we were discussing whether we could get through the snow to Mont St. Bernard. Some thought we could, and some thought not. So it goes here: we are gasping and sweltering one hour, and plunging through snow banks the next.After breakfast, we entered the _char-a-banc_, a crab-like, sideway carriage, and were soon on our way. Our path was cut from the breast of the mountain, in a stifling gorge walls of rock on both sides served as double reflectors to concentrate the heat of the sun on our hapless heads. To be sure, there was a fine... Nonfictions - Post by : add2it - Date : May 2012 - Author : Harriet Beecher Stowe - Read : 1157

Sunny Memories Of Foreign Lands, Volume 2 - Letter 35 Sunny Memories Of Foreign Lands, Volume 2 - Letter 35

Sunny Memories Of Foreign Lands, Volume 2 - Letter 35
LETTER XXXVDear Henry:--You cannot think how beautiful are these Alpine valleys. Our course, all the first morning after we left Chamouni, lay beside a broad, hearty, joyous mountain torrent, called, perhaps from the darkness of its waters, Eau Noire. Charming meadows skirted its banks. All the way along I could think of nothing but Bunyan's meadows beside the river of life, "curiously adorned with lilies." _These were curiously adorned, broidered, and inwrought with flowers, many and brilliant as those in a western prairie. Were I to undertake to describe them, I might make an inventory as long as Homer's list of... Nonfictions - Post by : ben.g - Date : May 2012 - Author : Harriet Beecher Stowe - Read : 1154

Sunny Memories Of Foreign Lands, Volume 2 - Letter 34 Sunny Memories Of Foreign Lands, Volume 2 - Letter 34

Sunny Memories Of Foreign Lands, Volume 2 - Letter 34
LETTER XXXIVMY DEAR:--The Mer de Glace is exactly opposite to La Flegere we were yesterday, and is reached by the ascent of what is called Montanvert, or Green Mountain. The path is much worse than the other, and in some places makes one's nerves twinge, especially that from which C. projected his avalanche. Just think of his wanting to stop me on the edge of a little shelf over that frightful chasm, and take away the guide from the head of my mule to help him get up avalanches!I warn you, if ever you visit the Alps, that a travelling... Nonfictions - Post by : simkl - Date : May 2012 - Author : Harriet Beecher Stowe - Read : 2593

Sunny Memories Of Foreign Lands, Volume 2 - Letter 33 Sunny Memories Of Foreign Lands, Volume 2 - Letter 33

Sunny Memories Of Foreign Lands, Volume 2 - Letter 33
LETTER XXXIIIMY DEAR:--Well, I waked up this morning, and the first thought was, "Here I am in the valley of Chamouni, right under the shadow of Mont Blanc, that I have studied about in childhood and found on the atlas." I sprang up, and ran to the window, to see if it was really there where I left it last night. Yes, true enough, there it was! right over our heads, as it were, blocking up our very existence; filling our minds with its presence; that colossal pyramid of dazzling snow! Its lower parts concealed by the roofs, only the three... Nonfictions - Post by : cclittle - Date : May 2012 - Author : Harriet Beecher Stowe - Read : 2995

Sunny Memories Of Foreign Lands, Volume 2 - Letter 32 Sunny Memories Of Foreign Lands, Volume 2 - Letter 32

Sunny Memories Of Foreign Lands, Volume 2 - Letter 32
LETTER XXXIIDEAR CHILDREN:--I promised to write from Chamouni, so to commence at the commencement. Fancy me, on a broiling day in July, panting with the heat, gazing from my window in Geneva upon Lake Leman, which reflects the sun like a burning glass, and thinking whether in America, or any where else, it was ever so hot before. This was quite a new view of the subject to me, who had been warned in Paris only of the necessity of blanket shawls, and had come to Switzerland with my head full of glaciers, and my trunk full of furs.While arranging my... Nonfictions - Post by : sbeard - Date : May 2012 - Author : Harriet Beecher Stowe - Read : 546

Sunny Memories Of Foreign Lands, Volume 2 - Letter 31 Sunny Memories Of Foreign Lands, Volume 2 - Letter 31

Sunny Memories Of Foreign Lands, Volume 2 - Letter 31
LETTER XXXIMY DEAR L.:--At last I have come into dreamland; into the lotus-eater's paradise; into the land where it is always afternoon. I am released from care; I am unknown, unknowing; I live in a house whose arrangements seem to me strange, old, and dreamy. In the heart of a great city I am as still as if in a convent; in the burning heats of summer our rooms are shadowy and cool as a cave. My time is all my own. I may at will lie on a sofa, and dreamily watch the play of the leaves and flowers, in... Nonfictions - Post by : Ndoki - Date : May 2012 - Author : Harriet Beecher Stowe - Read : 3555

Sunny Memories Of Foreign Lands, Volume 2 - Letter 30 Sunny Memories Of Foreign Lands, Volume 2 - Letter 30

Sunny Memories Of Foreign Lands, Volume 2 - Letter 30
LETTER XXXLONDON, June 3.MY DEAR HUSBAND:--According to request I will endeavor to keep you informed of all our goings on after you left, up to the time of our departure for Paris.We have borne in mind your advice to hasten away to the continent. C. wrote, a day or two since, to Mrs. C. at Paris, to secure very private lodgings, and by no means let any one know that we were coming. She has replied, urging us to come to her house, and promising entire seclusion and rest. So, since you departed, we have been passing with a kind of... Nonfictions - Post by : ow24160 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Harriet Beecher Stowe - Read : 2550