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Salammbo - Chapter 12. The Aqueduct Salammbo - Chapter 12. The Aqueduct

Salammbo - Chapter 12. The Aqueduct
CHAPTER XII. THE AQUEDUCTTwelve hours afterwards all that remained of the Mercenaries was a heap of wounded, dead, and dying. Hamilcar had suddenly emerged from the bottom of the gorge, and again descended the western slope that looked towards Hippo-Zarytus, and the space being broader at this spot he had taken care to draw the Barbarians into it. Narr' Havas had encompassed them with his horse; the Suffet meanwhile drove them back and crushed them. Then, too, they were conquered beforehand by the loss of the zaimph; even those who cared nothing about it had experienced anguish and something akin to... Long Stories - Post by : granknee - Date : May 2012 - Author : Gustave Flaubert - Read : 885

Salammbo - Chapter 11. In The Tent Salammbo - Chapter 11. In The Tent

Salammbo - Chapter 11. In The Tent
CHAPTER XI. IN THE TENTThe man who guided Salammbo made her ascend again beyond the pharos in the direction of the Catacombs, and then go down the long suburb of Molouya, which was full of steep lanes. The sky was beginning to grow grey. Sometimes palm-wood beams jutting out from the walls obliged them to bend their heads. The two horses which were at the walk would often slip; and thus they reached the Teveste gate. Its heavy leaves were half open; they passed through, and it closed behind them. At first they followed the foot of the ramparts for a... Long Stories - Post by : granknee - Date : May 2012 - Author : Gustave Flaubert - Read : 1635

Salammbo - Chapter 10. The Serpent Salammbo - Chapter 10. The Serpent

Salammbo - Chapter 10. The Serpent
CHAPTER X. THE SERPENTThese clamourings of the populace did not alarm Hamilcar's daughter. She was disturbed by loftier anxieties: her great serpent, the black python, was drooping; and in the eyes of the Carthaginians, the serpent was at once a national and a private fetish. It was believed to be the offspring of the dust of the earth, since it emerges from its depths and has no need of feet to traverse it; its mode of progression called to mind the undulations of rivers, its temperature the ancient, viscous, and fecund darkness, and the orbit which it describes when biting its... Long Stories - Post by : granknee - Date : May 2012 - Author : Gustave Flaubert - Read : 2003

Salammbo - Chapter 9. In The Field Salammbo - Chapter 9. In The Field

Salammbo - Chapter 9. In The Field
CHAPTER IX. IN THE FIELDHamilcar had thought that the Mercenaries would await him at Utica, or that they would return against him; and finding his forces insufficient to make or to sustain an attack, he had struck southwards along the right bank of the river, thus protecting himself immediately from a surprise. He intended first to wink at the revolt of the tribes and to detach them all from the cause of the Barbarians; then when they were quite isolated in the midst of the provinces he would fall upon them and exterminate them. In fourteen days he pacified the region... Long Stories - Post by : granknee - Date : May 2012 - Author : Gustave Flaubert - Read : 1752

Salammbo - Chapter 8. The Battle Of The Macaras Salammbo - Chapter 8. The Battle Of The Macaras

Salammbo - Chapter 8. The Battle Of The Macaras
CHAPTER VIII. THE BATTLE OF THE MACARASIn the following day he drew two hundred and twenty-three thousand kikars of gold from the Syssitia, and decreed a tax of fourteen shekels upon the rich. Even the women contributed; payment was made in behalf of the children, and he compelled the colleges of priests to furnish money--a monstrous thing, according to Carthaginian customs. He demanded all the horses, mules, and arms. A few tried to conceal their wealth, and their property was sold; and, to intimidate the avarice of the rest, he himself gave sixty suits of armour, and fifteen hundred gomers of... Long Stories - Post by : granknee - Date : May 2012 - Author : Gustave Flaubert - Read : 2234

Salammbo - Chapter 7. Hamilcar Barca Salammbo - Chapter 7. Hamilcar Barca

Salammbo - Chapter 7. Hamilcar Barca
CHAPTER VII. HAMILCAR BARCAThe Announcer of the Moons, who watched on the summit of the temple of Eschmoun every night in order to signal the disturbances of the planet with his trumpet, one morning perceived towards the west something like a bird skimming the surface of the sea with its long wings. It was a ship with three tiers of oars and with a horse carved on the prow. The sun was rising; the Announcer of the Moons put up his hand before his eyes, and then grasping his clarion with outstretched arms sounded a loud brazen cry over Carthage. People... Long Stories - Post by : granknee - Date : May 2012 - Author : Gustave Flaubert - Read : 2566

Salammbo - Chapter 6. Hanno Salammbo - Chapter 6. Hanno

Salammbo - Chapter 6. Hanno
CHAPTER VI. HANNO"I ought to have carried her off!" Matho said in the evening to Spendius. "I should have seized her, and torn her from her house! No one would have dared to touch me!" Spendius was not listening to him. Stretched on his back he was taking delicious rest beside a large jar filled with honey-coloured water, into which he would dip his head from time to time in order to drink more copiously. Matho resumed: "What is to be done? How can we re-enter Carthage?" "I do not know," said Spendius. Such impassibility exasperated Matho and he exclaimed: "Why!... Long Stories - Post by : granknee - Date : May 2012 - Author : Gustave Flaubert - Read : 1868

Salammbo - Chapter 2. At Sicca Salammbo - Chapter 2. At Sicca

Salammbo - Chapter 2. At Sicca
CHAPTER II. AT SICCATwo days afterwards the Mercenaries left Carthage. They had each received a piece of gold on the condition that they should go into camp at Sicca, and they had been told with all sorts of caresses: "You are the saviours of Carthage! But you would starve it if you remained there; it would become insolvent. Withdraw! The Republic will be grateful to you later for all this condescension. We are going to levy taxes immediately; your pay shall be in full, and galleys shall be equipped to take you back to your native lands." They did not know... Long Stories - Post by : granknee - Date : May 2012 - Author : Gustave Flaubert - Read : 812

Salammbo - Chapter 1. The Feast Salammbo - Chapter 1. The Feast

Salammbo - Chapter 1. The Feast
CHAPTER I. THE FEASTIt was at Megara, a suburb of Carthage, in the gardens of Hamilcar. The soldiers whom he had commanded in Sicily were having a great feast to celebrate the anniversary of the battle of Eryx, and as the master was away, and they were numerous, they ate and drank with perfect freedom. The captains, who wore bronze cothurni, had placed themselves in the central path, beneath a gold-fringed purple awning, which reached from the wall of the stables to the first terrace of the palace; the common soldiers were scattered beneath the trees numerous flat-roofed buildings might... Long Stories - Post by : granknee - Date : May 2012 - Author : Gustave Flaubert - Read : 3238

Over Strand And Field - Chapter 11. Mont Saint-Michel Over Strand And Field - Chapter 11. Mont Saint-Michel

Over Strand And Field - Chapter 11. Mont Saint-Michel
CHAPTER XI. MONT SAINT-MICHELThe road from Pontorson to the Mont Saint-Michel is wearying on account of the sand. Our post-chaise (for we also travel by post-chaise), was disturbed every now and then by a number of carts filled with the grey soil which is found in these parts and which is transported to some place and utilised as manure. They became more numerous as we approached the sea, and defiled for several miles until we finally saw the deserted strand whence they came. On this white surface, with its conical heaps of earth resembling huts, the fluctuating line of carts reminded... Nonfictions - Post by : ralf12 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Gustave Flaubert - Read : 1882

Over Strand And Field - Chapter 10. Saint-Malo Over Strand And Field - Chapter 10. Saint-Malo

Over Strand And Field - Chapter 10. Saint-Malo
CHAPTER X. SAINT-MALOSaint-Malo, which is built right on the ocean and is enclosed by ramparts, looks like a crown of stones, the gems of which are the machicolations. The breakers dash against its walls, and when the tide is low they gently unfurl on the sand. Little rocks covered with sea-weed dot the beach and look like black spots on its light surface. The larger ones, which are upright and smooth, support the fortifications, thus making them appear higher than they really are. Above this straight line of walls, broken here and there by a tower or the pointed ogive of... Nonfictions - Post by : ralf12 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Gustave Flaubert - Read : 1894

Over Strand And Field - Chapter 9. Brest Over Strand And Field - Chapter 9. Brest

Over Strand And Field - Chapter 9. Brest
CHAPTER IX. BRESTAt the light-house of Brest. Here the Old World ends. This is its most advanced point; its farthest limit. Behind you spread Europe and Asia; before you lies the entire ocean. As great as space appears to our eye, does it not always seem limited as soon as we know that it has a boundary? Can you not see from our shores, across the Channel, the streets of Brighton and the fortresses of Provence; do you not always think of the Mediterranean as an immense blue lake ensconced in rocks, with promontories covered with falling monuments, yellow sands, swaying... Nonfictions - Post by : ralf12 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Gustave Flaubert - Read : 2491

Over Strand And Field - Chapter 8. Roaming Over Strand And Field - Chapter 8. Roaming

Over Strand And Field - Chapter 8. Roaming
CHAPTER VIII. ROAMINGEn route! the sky is blue, the sun is shining, and our feet are eager to tread on the grass. From Crozon to Leudevenec the country is quite flat, and there is not a house nor a tree to be seen. As far as the eye can reach, reddish moss spreads over the ground. Sometimes fields of ripe wheat rise above the little stunted sea-rushes. The latter are flowerless now, and look as they did before the springtime. Deep wagon-tracks, edged by rolls of dried mud, make their appearance and continue for a long time; then they suddenly describe... Nonfictions - Post by : ralf12 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Gustave Flaubert - Read : 2513

Over Strand And Field - Chapter 7. Pont-L'abbe Over Strand And Field - Chapter 7. Pont-L'abbe

Over Strand And Field - Chapter 7. Pont-L'abbe
CHAPTER VII. PONT-L'ABBEAt five o'clock in the evening, we arrived at Pont-l'Abbe, covered with quite a respectable coating of mud and dust, which fell from our clothing upon the floor of the inn with such disastrous abundance, every time we moved, that we were almost mortified at the mess we made. Pont-l'Abbe is a peaceful little town, cut in two in its entire length by a broad, paved street. Its modest inhabitants cannot possibly look any more stupid or insignificant than the place itself. For those who must see something wherever they go, there are the unimportant remains of the castle... Nonfictions - Post by : ralf12 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Gustave Flaubert - Read : 1335

Over Strand And Field - Chapter 6. Quimper Over Strand And Field - Chapter 6. Quimper

Over Strand And Field - Chapter 6. Quimper
CHAPTER VI. QUIMPERQuimper, although it is the centre of the real Brittany, is distinctly different from it. The elm-tree promenade that follows the winding river, which has quays and boats, renders the town very pretty and the big Hotel de la Prefecture, which alone covers the little western delta, gives it a thoroughly administrative and French appearance. You are aware that you are in the _chef-lieu of a department, a fact brought home to you by the latter's division in _arrondissements_, with their large, medium, and small parishes, its committee of primary instruction, its saving banks, its town council and other... Nonfictions - Post by : ralf12 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Gustave Flaubert - Read : 3141

Over Strand And Field - Chapter 5. Return Over Strand And Field - Chapter 5. Return

Over Strand And Field - Chapter 5. Return
CHAPTER V. RETURNIn order to return to Quiberon, we were compelled, on the following day, to arise before seven o'clock, a feat which required some courage. While we were still stiff from fatigue and shivering with sleep, we got into a boat along with a white horse, two drummers, the same one-eyed gendarme and the same soldier who, this time, however, did not lecture anybody. As drunk as a lord, he kept slipping under the benches and had all he could do to keep his shako on his head and extricate his gun from between his feet. I could not say... Nonfictions - Post by : ralf12 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Gustave Flaubert - Read : 864

Over Strand And Field - Chapter 1. Chateau De Chambord Over Strand And Field - Chapter 1. Chateau De Chambord

Over Strand And Field - Chapter 1. Chateau De Chambord
CHAPTER I. CHATEAU DE CHAMBORDOVER STRAND AND FIELD(1) (Footnote 1: Gustave Flaubert was twenty-six years old when he started on this journey. He travelled on foot and was accompanied by M. Maxime Ducamp. When they returned, they wrote an account of their journey. It is by far the most important of the unpublished writings, for in it the author gives his personal genius full sway and it abounds in picturesque descriptions and historical reflections.)  We walked through the empty galleries and deserted rooms where spiders spin their cobwebs over the salamanders of Francis the First. One is overcome by a feeling... Nonfictions - Post by : ralf12 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Gustave Flaubert - Read : 2152

Bouvard And Pecuchet: A Tragi-comic Novel Of Bourgeois Life - Chapter 8. New Diversions Bouvard And Pecuchet: A Tragi-comic Novel Of Bourgeois Life - Chapter 8. New Diversions

Bouvard And Pecuchet: A Tragi-comic Novel Of Bourgeois Life - Chapter 8. New Diversions
CHAPTER VIII. NEW DIVERSIONSSatisfied with their regimen, they desired to improve their constitutions by gymnastics; and taking up the _Manual of Amoros_, they went through its atlas. All those young lads squatting, lying back, standing, bending their legs, lifting weights, riding on beams, climbing ladders, cutting capers on trapezes--such a display of strength and agility excited their envy. However, they were saddened by the splendour of the gymnasium described in the preface; for they would never be able to get a vestibule for the equipages, a hippodrome for the races, a sweep of water for the swimming, or a "mountain of... Long Stories - Post by : clov78 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Gustave Flaubert - Read : 927

Bouvard And Pecuchet: A Tragi-comic Novel Of Bourgeois Life - Chapter 7. 'Unlucky In Love' Bouvard And Pecuchet: A Tragi-comic Novel Of Bourgeois Life - Chapter 7. "Unlucky In Love"

Bouvard And Pecuchet: A Tragi-comic Novel Of Bourgeois Life - Chapter 7. 'Unlucky In Love'
CHAPTER VII. "UNLUCKY IN LOVE"And now the days began to be sad. They studied no longer, fearing lest they might be disillusioned. The inhabitants of Chavignolles avoided them. The newspapers they tolerated gave them no information; and so their solitude was unbroken, their time completely unoccupied. Sometimes they would open a book, and then shut it again--what was the use of it? On other days they would be seized with the idea of cleaning up the garden: at the end of a quarter of an hour they would be fatigued; or they would set out to have a look at the... Long Stories - Post by : clov78 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Gustave Flaubert - Read : 2311

Bouvard And Pecuchet: A Tragi-comic Novel Of Bourgeois Life - Chapter 6. Revolt Of The People Bouvard And Pecuchet: A Tragi-comic Novel Of Bourgeois Life - Chapter 6. Revolt Of The People

Bouvard And Pecuchet: A Tragi-comic Novel Of Bourgeois Life - Chapter 6. Revolt Of The People
CHAPTER VI. REVOLT OF THE PEOPLEOn the morning of the 25th of February, 1848, the news was brought to Chavignolles, by a person who had come from Falaise, that Paris was covered with barricades, and the next day the proclamation of the Republic was posted up outside the mayor's office. This great event astonished the inhabitants. But when they learned that the Court of Cassation, the Court of Appeal, the Court of Exchequer, the Chamber of Notaries, the order of advocates, the Council of State, the University, the generals, and M. de la Roche-Jacquelein himself had given promise of their adherence... Long Stories - Post by : clov78 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Gustave Flaubert - Read : 2054