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Clergymen's Salaries Clergymen's Salaries

Clergymen's Salaries
Whether we bear or forbear, it is difficult to appease Mrs. Candour. Her responsibility is incessant, and the world always needs her correction. A certain religious society recently decided to give their minister a certain salary, which was apparently larger in the opinion of Mrs. Candour than any minister should receive, and she expressed herself to the effect that no society ought to offer and no clergyman ought to accept so large a sum. Mrs. Candour's impertinence is certainly as striking as her sense of responsibility. What business can it possibly be of hers whether a clergyman, or a lawyer, or... Essays - Post by : esource - Date : November 2011 - Author : George William Curtis - Read : 716

Cheapening His Name Cheapening His Name

Cheapening His Name
A distinguished public man once said to the Easy Chair that after an election in which he had taken part, and in which his party had succeeded, he always signed the recommendations of anybody who asked him for any office he wished. And when the Easy Chair remarked that he must have sadly cheapened his name with the appointing power, the excellent statesman answered, "Not at all; because I wrote by mail that no attention was to be paid to my request." Perhaps he thought that this was not cheapening his name. But what must the appointing power have secretly thought... Essays - Post by : KevinR - Date : November 2011 - Author : George William Curtis - Read : 595

The Dead Bird Upon Cyrilla's Hat An Encouragement Of 'slarter' The Dead Bird Upon Cyrilla's Hat An Encouragement Of "slarter"

The Dead Bird Upon Cyrilla's Hat An Encouragement Of 'slarter'
The story of the butcher who looked out in the soft summer moonlight and announced that something ought to be done on so fine a night, and he guessed he would go out and "slarter," was told to Melissa, who ejaculated pretty ohs and ahs, and said, "But how vulgar." Yet had some dreadful Nathan heard the words, and beheld Melissa as she spoke, he would have raised his voice and pointed his finger and said, "Thou art the woman!" For the delicate Melissa was the wearer of dead birds in her hat, and encouraged the "slarter" of the loveliest and... Essays - Post by : bapkigar - Date : November 2011 - Author : George William Curtis - Read : 947

Bicycle Riding For Children Bicycle Riding For Children

Bicycle Riding For Children
There has been some joking over Mr. Gerry's proposal to bring Mr. Barnum to legal judgment for violating the statute in exhibiting the young riders upon the bicycle. Mr. Barnum invited a distinguished company, including eminent physicians, to witness the performance; the physicians added that it was no more than healthful exercise. Thereupon the cynics, who have never given a thought or lifted a hand to relieve suffering or to remedy wrong, sneer at superserviceable philanthropy. Mr. Bergh also complained of the killing of the elephant Pilate, and when the matter was explained there was contemptuous chuckling at the sentimental tomfoolery... Essays - Post by : bobinorlando - Date : November 2011 - Author : George William Curtis - Read : 1886

Reform Charity Reform Charity

Reform Charity
The State Board of Charities in New York would deal severely with Elia if it found him upon the street, stammering out his admiration of the fine histrionic powers of a beggar, and searching in his pocket for a penny. Lamb said that it was shameful to pay a crown for a seat in the theatre to enjoy the representation of woes that you knew to be fictitious, and to grudge a sixpence to the street performer who was so excellent that you could not tell whether his sufferings were real or affected. He is undoubtedly responsible for a great deal... Essays - Post by : denise - Date : November 2011 - Author : George William Curtis - Read : 1448

The Reunion Of Antislavery Veterans. 1884 The Reunion Of Antislavery Veterans. 1884

The Reunion Of Antislavery Veterans. 1884
On a pleasant day and evening during the autumn a few venerable graybeards and bald-heads met in a church in the city, and sang and spoke, and told old tales of former meetings, and rejoiced that they had not died before their eyes had seen the glory. The meeting produced no ripple upon the surface of the city life. The newspapers printed brief reports of it among the other city news. But the return of the Philadelphia baseball players, and the "mill" between Sullivan and other bruisers, challenged very much more space and a very much more public attention. Yet fifty... Essays - Post by : MSCOTT - Date : November 2011 - Author : George William Curtis - Read : 969

The New England Sabbath The New England Sabbath

The New England Sabbath
There are still villages among the hills of New England--we cannot call them remote hills, because the locomotive darts up every valley and fills the woods upon the highest hill-side with the shrill, eager cry of hurrying life and bustling human society, but even where the steam is heard, softened and far away, there are yet villages nestling in the hills in which also the old New England Sabbath lingers and nestles. The village street, broad and arched with thick-foliaged sugar-maples, is always still. In the warm silence of a summer noon, as you sit reading upon the piazza or in... Essays - Post by : demenev - Date : November 2011 - Author : George William Curtis - Read : 687

Mr. Tibbins's New-year's Call Mr. Tibbins's New-year's Call

Mr. Tibbins's New-year's Call
Mr. Tibbins wishes that his experience in making New-Year's calls may be made useful as an illustration of the deceitfulness of appearances. He is one of the gentlemen who do not keep dogs, although he lives in the country, and who decline social visits to persons who do. Mr. Tibbins is, however, just and impartial. "My friends," he says, "shall not complain of any obscurity in my conduct. I simply offer them the alternative, me or your dog--not both. If your tastes and preferences are such that you will have large or small animals lying within your gates, yelping and growling... Essays - Post by : t_kio - Date : November 2011 - Author : George William Curtis - Read : 3288

Public Benefactors Public Benefactors

Public Benefactors
There is a class of unrecognized public benefactors to which the Easy Chair wishes to offer a respectful tribute of gratitude. Their service is none the less because it is unconscious; and it is not confined to either sex. It is, besides, a very varied service, as will be readily seen as we advance in our description. Let us, then, without delay, and to begin with, specify as benefactors of this kind the young and other gentlemen who do duty at club windows, and the ladies who kindly appear only in the latest fashions. Most men, intent upon the necessary industry... Essays - Post by : opal1895 - Date : November 2011 - Author : George William Curtis - Read : 3041

The Boston Music Hall The Boston Music Hall

The Boston Music Hall
It is not, of course, possible that New York feels any chagrin that Boston has given the most colossal concert ever known upon the continent; but it is observable that, as wind and fire finally levelled the last timbers of the Boston Coliseum in the dust, the first step taken was taken towards the Beethoven Centennial Celebration, in New York. The project is not yet matured; but a vision of something very large indeed, something "metropolitan," begins to allure expectation; and Boston, having scored handsomely in the game, sits upon the ruins of her Coliseum and the profits of her Jubilee... Essays - Post by : tomseve - Date : November 2011 - Author : George William Curtis - Read : 1521

Historic Buildings Historic Buildings

Historic Buildings
A few months ago the Easy Chair, seeing that changes were making in the old State-house in Boston, one of the few Revolutionary and truly historic buildings that remain, modestly ventured to regret it, and to deplore the rapid disappearance of the venerable relics that had come down to us from former generations. It suggested, or meant to suggest, or might, could, would, or should have suggested, and will now, under correction, suggest that there are very few buildings in New York which recall that earlier epoch of the country. With a national and pardonable logic, or association of ideas, the... Essays - Post by : olman - Date : November 2011 - Author : George William Curtis - Read : 818

Church Street Church Street

Church Street
On the earliest of the really spring-like mornings as the Easy Chair turned into Church Street it could not help perceiving that in some romantic ways the New-Yorker has the advantage of the Londoner and Parisian. Church Street does not, indeed, seem at the first mention to be a promising domain of romance, nor a fond haunt of the Muses. Indeed, it must not be denied that it has an unsavory name; and when the city loiterer recalls Wapping, or a May morning on the Seine quais, he will smile at Church Street as a field of romance, and the Easy... Essays - Post by : minhtran - Date : November 2011 - Author : George William Curtis - Read : 718

The Departure Of The 'great Eastern' The Departure Of The "great Eastern"

The Departure Of The 'great Eastern'
I saw the Great Eastern sail away. The afternoon was exquisite--one of the cool, clear, perfect days that followed the storm in the middle of August; and it seemed to hang over the great ship like a cordial smile. But it was the only smile the poor Leviathan received. There was a Christian resignation in her departure. The big ship, like Falstaff, "'a made a finer end and went away, an it had been any christom child: 'a parted even just between" four and five, "ev'n at turning o' the tide." But as when a prince is born, and the bells... Essays - Post by : Eardrum - Date : November 2011 - Author : George William Curtis - Read : 2608

The Maid And The Wit The Maid And The Wit

The Maid And The Wit
The fabled stream that sank from sight, and emerged far away, still flowing, is an image of the course of all progress. The argument which establishes the reason and the benefit of reform does not, therefore, at once establish it, still less complete it. There are obstructions, delays, disappearances; but still the stream flows, seen or unseen, still it swells, and reappearing far beyond where it vanished, moves brimming to the sea. The Lady Mavourneen, who, coming to us straight from Paris, found here a courteous regard for women, which she said that after a life's residence she had not found... Essays - Post by : daniamin - Date : November 2011 - Author : George William Curtis - Read : 1751

Reception To The Japanese Ambassadors At The White House Reception To The Japanese Ambassadors At The White House

Reception To The Japanese Ambassadors At The White House
Herr Teufelsdrockh informs those who read his famous book, the Tailor Sewer Over; or, the Philosophy of Clothes, that Mr. Pellum announces, among other canons regulating human apparel, that it is permitted to mankind, under certain conditions, to wear white waistcoats. But it now appears that, under certain conditions also, straw-colored gloves are not only permissible, but imperative. When a Japanese ambassador appears, and the white flag with the orb of day in its centre is unfurled, straw-color, as to the hands, is the only wear. Therefore, when the reception was to take place in Washington the deeply initiated held hands... Essays - Post by : ServeGold - Date : November 2011 - Author : George William Curtis - Read : 2292

Washington In 1867 Washington In 1867

Washington In 1867
The gay young European diplomatist, accustomed to the charms of the great foreign capitals--London, Paris, Vienna, Rome, and the scores of small but delightful cities--probably regards an attachment to the embassy of his country in the United States as a Boeotian exile. But when, eagerly curious to see the capital of this remote region, he is dumped in the railroad-shed at Washington, and emerges upon the depthless mud or blinding dust of the city, upon its hackmen and porters, greedy of his last penny, and upon its general hopelessness of aspect, it is not difficult to imagine how his heart sinks... Essays - Post by : greenrob - Date : November 2011 - Author : George William Curtis - Read : 3168

Review Of Union Troops Review Of Union Troops

Review Of Union Troops
1865 The victorious armies had marched home and into history. The two days of review at the end of May was a spectacle not likely to be forgotten by those who saw it or did not see it. It belonged to that series of events for which there is no precedence, because there never was before a continental republic. Like every remarkable occurrence in these remarkable days of ours, the disbanding of the armies of the East and West, and their quiet absorption into the mass of the people, is a spectacle which has another illustration to the extreme practicability of... Essays - Post by : paul77 - Date : November 2011 - Author : George William Curtis - Read : 3070

Joseph Wesley Harper Joseph Wesley Harper

Joseph Wesley Harper
Often during the long and sorrowful days of the war, as the Easy Chair wound its slow way to its corner, it heard a quiet greeting, and, looking up, saw a friend standing aside upon the steps, calm, unhurried, and the greeting was followed by the significant and challenging question, "Well?" The tone was tender and tranquil, and conveyed all the meaning of many words: "Where are we now? What will come of this last news? How, when, and where will the bitter struggle end?" Then stepping out upon one of the bridges that connect the tower of the staircase with... Essays - Post by : Greycap - Date : November 2011 - Author : George William Curtis - Read : 2903

Honor Honor

Honor
These are very precious words of Lovelace: "I could not love thee, dear, so much, Loved I not honor more."And Francis First's message to his mother after Pavia, "All is lost but honor," is in the same key. Yet honor has been as much travestied as liberty, and the crimes committed in its name are as many. Falstaff's is a sharp antistrophe: "What is in that word honor? What is that honor? Air." But for that whiff of air how many noble lives have been sacrificed! Alexander Hamilton knew his own time,... Essays - Post by : mac2k - Date : November 2011 - Author : George William Curtis - Read : 2062

Herbert Spencer On The Yankee Herbert Spencer On The Yankee

Herbert Spencer On The Yankee
It was a very distinguished and agreeable company that greeted Mr. Herbert Spencer at dinner, and the speaking was capital. His own address was an interesting paper, in which he preached "the gospel of relaxation." In an interview published some time before, he had made some incisive criticisms upon American life and character, and in his dinner address he said that he was going to find fault. "The Redcoats all talk to us like uncles or pedagogues," exclaimed Americus, impatiently. "What business have they to lecture us in this style? We are quite old enough to take care of ourselves, and... Essays - Post by : electronicbiz - Date : November 2011 - Author : George William Curtis - Read : 1048